We offer an extensive range of training courses, from Software and Data Carpentry courses that teach core research IT skills, though to specialised courses on programming and applications. Below is a list of upcoming courses. You will also find some general training links and a list of past courses. 

If you have any questions please contact the training coordinator Katerina Michalickova. We also welcome suggestions regarding new training topics.

Upcoming courses

Software Carpentry - April 15-16 and May 1-2, 2019

CLASS DESCRIPTION:

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

This free hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools (Linux command line, Git version system and Python). Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems. The workshop is ideal for researchers who do not have formal training in programming, or who have just started a project that will involve some scientific computing.

Class details and dates:
DateTimeLocationInstructor

April 15-16, 2019 (two full days)

R for reproducible scientific analysis

10.00 - 17.00 School of Medicine, SMMS 142 - Hynds computer room, St Mary's Campus Margarita Kariolou (Epidemiology and Biostatistics), Elzbieta Lauzikaite (Surgery and Cancer), Kiana West (Surgery and Cancer), Anat Melamed (Medicine)

May 1-2, 2019 (two full days)

Unix shell, Git version system and Programming and plotting with Python

 10.00 - 17.00 Sherfield ICSM S309, South Kensington Campus Santiago Lacalle (Research Computing Service), Diego Alonso Alvarez (Research Computing Service), TBA
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REGISTRATION and DETAILS:

The Linux command line for Scientific Computing - May 9 and 10, 2019

CLASS DESCRIPTION:

Computing has became an integral part of science and a great majority of computational tools require use of command line since it provides a more concise and powerful means to control a program or operating system.  For example, interaction with the HPC resources at the College is solely through the command line.  At the end of this class, the students will be able to interact with the command line environment, navigate the directory tree, manage their files and issue commands with parameters.

Outline:

This 2-part tutorial will cover:

  • File management for a scientific project
  • Text editing with nano
  • Basic Unix commands and parameters
  • Command redirection and pipes
  • Types of files
  • Running programs on the command line
  • Connecting to a remote server
  • Examples of installing software

Prerequisites:  The class has PCs or you are welcome to use your laptop.  No prerequisite knowledge required.

 

Class details and dates:
DateTimeLocationInstructor
part 1 - May 9, 2019 14:00-16:00 Training room 1, Central Library, South Kensington Campus Katerina Michalickova, Graduate School and Computational Methods Hub
part 2 - May 10, 2019 14:00-16:00 Training room 1, Central Library, South Kensington Campus Katerina Michalickova, Graduate School and Computational Methods Hub
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REGISTRATION:

  •  May 9 and 10, 2019 - This class is part of the Graduate School offering, please register here.  If you are not a graduate student, please contact the instructor directly.

Bash shell scripting - May 14, 2019

CLASS DESCRIPTION:

This workshop provides a concise introduction to scripting and task automation in the Unix bash shell. The workshop participants will be exposed to many examples and hands-on activities that can be put to use in everyday computing.

A bash shell script is a series of unix commands written in a plain text file. When a script is executed, commands are performed in a sequence. This facility allows us to accomplish multiple and/or repetitive tasks with just one command and can substantially simplify handling of various administration tasks from managing large datasets to setting up complicated workflows. In the HPC setting, scripts are used for submitting jobs to the queue system. Shell scripts can also utilise variables, control statements and loops that turn a simple script into a program in its own right.

 

Syllabus:  

  • Quick command review (if needed)
  • What is a bash script and why do we need it
  • Variables
  • Tests
  • Loops
  • Functions
  • Worked example

 

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of the command line.  The class has PCs or you are welcome to use your laptop.

Class details:
DateTimeLocationInstructor
May 14, 2019  14:00 - 16:00 Training Room 1, Central Library, South Kensington Campus Katerina Michalickova, the Graduate School and the Computational Methods Hub

 

REGISTRATION:

This class is part of the Graduate School offering, please register here.   If you are not a graduate student, please contact the instructor directly.

Introduction to HPC at Imperial - May 16 and 17, 2019

CLASS DESCRIPTION:

The course will provide participants with a hands-on introduction to the High Performance Computing systems at the College. The class is intended for HPC newbies, we'll start with the very basics of cluster computing.  After an introductory part, we'll log into the cx1 system for guided exercises that will require some prior knowledge of command line and shell scripting. 

Outline:

This 2-part tutorial will cover:

  • systems at Imperial
  • module system
  • file management on the clusters
  • queue system
  • job parameters
  • job scripts
  • serial jobs
  • hands-on serial job
  • multiple serial jobs
  • hands-on multiple serial job

Prerequisites:  The class has PCs or you are welcome to use your laptop.  Some knowledge of the command line is required.

 

Class details and dates:
DateTimeLocationInstructor
part 1 - May 16, 2019 14:00-16:00 Training room 1 , Central Library, South Kensington Campus Katerina Michalickova, the Graduate School and the Computational Methods Hub
part 2 - May 17, 2019 14:00-16:00 Training room 1 , Central Library, South Kensington Campus Katerina Michalickova, the Graduate School and the Computational Methods Hub
Summary of the table's content23 February 2018

 


REGISTRATION:

  • May 16 and 17 - This class is part of the Graduate School offering, please register here.   If you are not a graduate student, please contact the instructor directly.

General training links

General training links

 

Course Link 
Specialist Postgraduate IT training courses   

The Centre for Continuing Development offers several specialist Postgraduate IT training courses. Check their website for details, dates and registration. 

The  Linux for HPC Beginners course offered by the Centre for Continuing Development the HPC Service arranges training courses for HPC users. The courses are generally scheduled to be run when there is sufficient demand to fill all the places. Generally a professional trainer is contracted to deliver the course. Every course is tailored to the particular needs of Imperial College HPC users and there is usually a substantial practical content. Where possible arrangements are made for GSEPS accreditation. The courses are run on a cost recovery basis, which means that there is a fee for each course and that each course must have sufficient number of attendees (usually 12) to be run.

Software Carpentry  The Software Carpentry Foundation is a non-profit volunteer organization whose members teach researchers basic software skills.

ARCHER training  

ARCHER is UK National Supercomputing Service. The ARCHER training team delivers HPC classes at various universities including Imperial and UCL.

ARCHER training page.

ARCHER Virtual Tutorials and Webinars  

Several virtual tutorials and webminars offered by the ARCHER service. They take place usually at 15:00 UK time on Wednesdays.

Science and Technology Facilities Council  Latest events.
Science and Engineering South Events list.