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  • Journal article
    Kanvil S, Powell G, Turnbull C, 2014,

    Pea aphid biotype performance on diverse Medicago host genotypes indicates highly specific virulence and resistance functions

    , Bulletin of Entomological Research, Vol: 104, Pages: 689-701, ISSN: 1475-2670

    Aphid–plant interactions depend on genotypes of both organisms, which determine the two-way molecular exchange that leads to compatible or incompatible outcomes. The underlying genes are mostly unknown, making it difficult to predict likelihood of aphid success or host resistance, and hampering crop genetic improvement. Here we screened eight pea aphid clonal genotypes collected from diverse legume hosts, on a species-wide panel of Medicago truncatula (Mt) genotypes. Aphid virulence was measured by survival, fecundity and growth rate, together with scores for chlorosis and necrosis as host response indicators. Outcomes were highly dependent on the specific aphid–host genotype combinations. Only one Mt line was fully resistant against all clones. Aphid-induced host chlorosis and necrosis varied greatly, but correlated with resistance only in a few combinations. Bi-clustering analysis indicated that all aphid clones could be distinguished by their performance profiles across the host genotypes tested, with each clone being genetically differentiated and potentially representing a distinct biotype. Clones originating from Medicago sativa ranged from highly virulent to almost completely avirulent on both Medicago species, indicating that some were well adapted, whereas others were most likely migrants. Comparisons of closely related pairs of Australian Mt genotypes differing in aphid resistance revealed no enhanced resistance to European pea aphid clones. Based on the extensive variation in pea aphid adaptation even on unfamiliar hosts, most likely reflecting multiple biotype-specific gene-for-gene interactions, we conclude that robust defences require an arsenal of appropriate resistance genes.

  • Journal article
    Young NF, Ferguson BJ, Antoniadi I, Bennett MH, Beveridge CA, Turnbull CGNet al., 2014,

    Conditional Auxin Response and Differential Cytokinin Profiles in Shoot Branching Mutants.

    , Plant physiology, Vol: 165, Pages: 1723-1736, ISSN: 0032-0889

    Strigolactone (SL), auxin, and cytokinin (CK) are hormones that interact to regulate shoot branching. For example, several ramosus (rms) branching mutants in pea (Pisum sativum) have SL defects, perturbed xylem CK levels, and diminished responses to auxin in shoot decapitation assays. In contrast with the last of these characteristics, we discovered that buds on isolated nodes (explants) of rms plants instead respond normally to auxin. We hypothesized that the presence or absence of attached roots would result in transcriptional and hormonal differences in buds and subtending stem tissues, and might underlie the differential auxin response. However, decapitated plants and explants both showed similar up-regulation of CK biosynthesis genes, increased CK levels, and down-regulation of auxin transport genes. Moreover, auxin application counteracted these trends, regardless of the effectiveness of auxin at inhibiting bud growth. Multivariate analysis revealed that stem transcript and CK changes were largely associated with decapitation and/or root removal and auxin response, whereas bud transcript profiles related more to SL defects. CK clustering profiles were indicative of additional zeatin-type CKs in decapitated stems being supplied by roots and thus promoting bud growth in SL-deficient genotypes even in the presence of added auxin. This difference in CK content may explain why rms buds on explants respond better to auxin than those on decapitated plants. We further conclude that rapid changes in CK status in stems are auxin dependent but largely SL independent, suggesting a model in which auxin and CK are dominant regulators of decapitation-induced branching, whereas SLs are more important in intact plants.

  • Journal article
    O'Donnelly K, Zhao G, Patel P, Butt MS, Mak LH, Kretschmer S, Woscholski R, Barter LMCet al., 2014,

    Isolation and kinetic characterisation of hydrophobically distinct populations of form I Rubisco

    , Planet Methods, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1746-4811

    BackgroundRubisco (Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) is a Calvin Cycle enzyme involved in CO2 assimilation. It is thought to be a major cause of photosynthetic inefficiency, suffering from both a slow catalytic rate and lack of specificity due to a competing reaction with oxygen. Revealing and understanding the engineering rules that dictate Rubisco’s activity could have a significant impact on photosynthetic efficiency and crop yield.ResultsThis paper describes the purification and characterisation of a number of hydrophobically distinct populations of Rubisco from both Spinacia oleracea and Brassica oleracea extracts. The populations were obtained using a novel and rapid purification protocol that employs hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) as a form I Rubisco enrichment procedure, resulting in distinct Rubisco populations of expected enzymatic activities, high purities and integrity.ConclusionsWe demonstrate here that HIC can be employed to isolate form I Rubisco with purities and activities comparable to those obtained via ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Interestingly, and in contrast to other published purification methods, HIC resulted in the isolation of a number of hydrophobically distinct Rubisco populations. Our findings reveal a so far unaccounted diversity in the hydrophobic properties within form 1 Rubisco. By employing HIC to isolate and characterise Spinacia oleracea and Brassica oleracea, we show that the presence of these distinct Rubisco populations is not species specific, and we report for the first time the kinetic properties of Rubisco from Brassica oleracea extracts. These observations may aid future studies concerning Rubisco’s structural and functional properties.

  • Journal article
    Miller D, Booth PJ, Seddon JM, Templer RH, Law RV, Woscholski R, Ces O, Barter LMCet al., 2013,

    Protocell design through modular compartmentalization

    , JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1742-5689
  • Journal article
    Feinberg H, Jegouzo SAF, Rowntree TJW, Guan Y, Brash MA, Taylor ME, Weis WI, Drickamer Ket al., 2013,

    Mechanism for Recognition of an Unusual Mycobacterial Glycolipid by the Macrophage Receptor Mincle

    , JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 288, Pages: 28457-28465
  • Journal article
    Windram O, Madhou P, McHattie S, Hill C, Hickman R, Cooke E, Jenkins DJ, Penfold CA, Baxter L, Breeze E, Kiddle SJ, Rhodes J, Atwell S, Kliebenstein DJ, Kim Y-S, Stegle O, Borgwardt K, Zhang C, Tabrett A, Legaie R, Moore J, Finkenstadt B, Wild DL, Mead A, Rand D, Beynon J, Ott S, Buchanan-Wollaston V, Denby KJet al., 2012,

    Arabidopsis defense against Botrytis cinerea: Chronology and regulation deciphered by high-resolution temporal transcriptomic analysis

    , Plant Cell, Vol: 24, Pages: 3530-3557, ISSN: 1040-4651

    Transcriptional reprogramming forms a major part of a plant’s response to pathogen infection. Many individual components and pathways operating during plant defense have been identified, but our knowledge of how these different components interact is still rudimentary. We generated a high-resolution time series of gene expression profiles from a single Arabidopsis thaliana leaf during infection by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Approximately one-third of the Arabidopsis genome is differentially expressed during the first 48 h after infection, with the majority of changes in gene expression occurring before significant lesion development. We used computational tools to obtain a detailed chronology of the defense response against B. cinerea, highlighting the times at which signaling and metabolic processes change, and identify transcription factor families operating at different times after infection. Motif enrichment and network inference predicted regulatory interactions, and testing of one such prediction identified a role for TGA3 in defense against necrotrophic pathogens. These data provide an unprecedented level of detail about transcriptional changes during a defense response and are suited to systems biology analyses to generate predictive models of the gene regulatory networks mediating the Arabidopsis response to B. cinerea.

  • Journal article
    Wormit A, Butt SM, Chairam I, McKenna JF, Nunes-Nesi A, Kjaer L, O'Donnelly K, Fernie AR, Woscholski R, Barter MCL, Hamann Tet al., 2012,

    Osmosensitive Changes of Carbohydrate Metabolism in Response to Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibition

    , PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, Vol: 159, Pages: 105-117, ISSN: 0032-0889
  • Journal article
    Charalambous K, Booth PJ, Woscholski R, Seddon JM, Templer RH, Law RV, Barter LMC, Ces Oet al., 2012,

    Engineering de Novo Membrane-Mediated Protein-Protein Communication Networks

    , JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, Vol: 134, Pages: 5746-5749, ISSN: 0002-7863
  • Journal article
    Fournier F, Gardner EM, Guo R, Donaldson PM, Barter LMC, Palmer DJ, Barnett CJ, Willison KR, Gould IR, Klug DRet al., 2008,

    Optical fingerprinting of peptides using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: Proof of principle

    , ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY, Vol: 374, Pages: 358-365, ISSN: 0003-2697
  • Journal article
    Donaldson PM, Guo R, Fournier F, Gardner EM, Barter LMC, Barnett CJ, Gould IR, Klug DR, Palmer DJ, Willison KRet al., 2007,

    Direct identification and decongestion of Fermi resonances by control of pulse time ordering in two-dimensional IR spectroscopy (vol 127, art no. 114513, 2007)

    , JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS, Vol: 127, ISSN: 0021-9606
  • Journal article
    Barter LMC, Klug DR, Woscholski R, 2007,

    Does history repeat itself? The emergence of a new discipline (vol 1, pg 737, 2006)

    , ACS CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, Vol: 2, Pages: 271-271, ISSN: 1554-8929
  • Journal article
    Donaldson PM, Guo R, Fournier F, Gardner EM, Barter LMC, Palmer DJ, Barnett CJ, Willison KR, Gould IR, Klug DRet al., 2007,

    Direct identification and decongestion of Fermi Resonances by control of pulse time-ordering in 2D-IR Spectroscopy

    , Journal Of Chemical Physics
  • Journal article
    Barter LMC, Klug DR, Woscholski R, 2006,

    Does history repeat itself? The emergence of a new discipline

    , ACS CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, Vol: 1, Pages: 737-740, ISSN: 1554-8929
  • Journal article
    Barter LMC, Klug DR, 2005,

    A unified picture of energy and electron transfer in primary photosynthesis

    , CHEMICAL PHYSICS, Vol: 319, Pages: 308-315, ISSN: 0301-0104
  • Book chapter
    Barter LMC, van Grondelle R, Klug DR, 2005,

    Energy trapping and equilibration: a balance of regulation and efficiency

    , Photosystem II: the light-driven water: plastoquinone oxidoreductase, Editors: Wydrzynski, Satoh, Wydrzynski, Satoh, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 491-514, ISBN: 9781402042492
  • Journal article
    Barter LMC, Durrant JR, Klug DR, 2003,

    A quantitative structure-function relationship for the Photosystern II reaction center: Supermolecular behavior in natural photosynthesis

    , PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 100, Pages: 946-951, ISSN: 0027-8424
  • Journal article
    Barter LMC, Schilstra MJ, Barber J, Durrant JR, Klug DRet al., 2001,

    Are the trapping dynamics in Photosystem II sensitive to Q(A) redox potential?

    , JOURNAL OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOBIOLOGY A-CHEMISTRY, Vol: 142, Pages: 127-132, ISSN: 1010-6030
  • Journal article
    Barter LMC, Bianchietti M, Jeans C, Schilstra MJ, Hankamer B, Diner BA, Barber J, Durrant JR, Klug DRet al., 2001,

    Relationship between excitation energy transfer, trapping, and antenna size in photosystem II

    , BIOCHEMISTRY, Vol: 40, Pages: 4026-4034, ISSN: 0006-2960
  • Journal article
    Schilstra MJ, Nield J, Dorner W, Hankamer B, Carradus M, Barter LMC, Barber J, Klug DRet al., 1999,

    Similarity between electron donor side reactions in the solubilized Photosystem II-LHC II supercomplex and Photosystem-II-containing membranes

    , Photosynthesis Research, Vol: 60, Pages: 191-198, ISSN: 0166-8595
  • Journal article
    Schilstra MJ, Nield J, Dorner W, Hankamer B, Carradus M, Barter LMC, Barber J, Klug DRet al., 1999,

    Similarity between electron donor side reactions in the solubilized Photosystem II-LHC II supercomplex and Photosystem-II-containing membranes

    , Photosynthesis Research, Vol: 60, Pages: 191-198, ISSN: 0166-8595
  • Journal article
    Merry SAP, Nixon PJ, Barter LMC, Schilstra MJ, Porter G, Barber J, Durrant JR, Klug DRet al., 1998,

    Modulation of quantum yield of primary radical pair formation in photosystem II by site-directed mutagenesis affecting radical cations and anions

    , Biochemistry, Vol: 37, Pages: 17439-17447, ISSN: 0006-2960
  • Journal article
    Merry SAP, Nixon PJ, Barter LMC, Schilstra MJ, Porter G, Barber J, Durrant JR, Klug DRet al., 1998,

    Modulation of quantum yield of primary radical pair formation in photosystem II by site-directed mutagenesis affecting radical cations and anions

    , Biochemistry, Vol: 37, Pages: 17439-17447, ISSN: 0006-2960
  • Journal article
    Klug DR, Durrant JR, Joseph DM, Kumazaki S, Merry S, Barter L, Yoshihara K, Barber J, Porter Get al., 1996,

    Observation of an intermediate step during primary charge separation by photosystem two

    , Springer Series in Chemical Physics, Vol: 62, Pages: 342-343, ISSN: 0172-6218

    We show that primary radical pair formation in isolated PS2 reaction centres occurs via an intermediate state which appears to be an unrelaxed form of the final radical pair P680+Ph-.

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