Featured videos from the Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London.  Watch more videos on our Chemical Engineering YouTube channel including full-length lectures from our Distinguished Seminar Series.

Latest videos

Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre

Carbon Capture and Storage is a vital technology for deployment in our efforts to keep global warming near to the much discussed 2˚C threshold.

Imperial College London has a history of expertise in CCS – because of this Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park began funding the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College – a ten year project, finishing at the end of 2018, with $70 million (USD) in funding.

To make CCS globally commercial viable requires a detailed understanding of the character of the rocks in question; an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids at multiple scales; and the behaviour of fluids in a wide range of conditions.

The Centre brings together over 80 researchers and PhD students from nearly 30 different countries to provide expertise in all these areas. Nearly 50 PhD theses will have been completed by the end of the programme. The programme includes fieldwork in Oman, UAE, Spain and the UK to help better understand the reservoir geology in the Middle East supplemented with laboratory work including the first application of clumped isotopes to reservoir descriptions. There are also numerous researchers working on how fluids (e.g., carbon dioxide) flow through rocks of varying porosity and heterogeneity and we have built a dedicated imaging laboratory using X-Ray computer-aided tomography (CT) to observe the properties of carbon dioxide at reservoir conditions in an area of technology now known as “digital rocks”.

Qatar Carbonate and Carbon Storage Research Centre

Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre

Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre

The Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College London

Carbon Capture and Storage is a vital technology for deployment in our efforts to keep global warming near to the much discussed 2˚C threshold.

Imperial College London has a history of expertise in CCS – because of this Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park began funding the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre at Imperial College – a ten year project, finishing at the end of 2018, with $70 million (USD) in funding.

To make CCS globally commercial viable requires a detailed understanding of the character of the rocks in question; an understanding of the interaction between rocks and fluids at multiple scales; and the behaviour of fluids in a wide range of conditions.

The Centre brings together over 80 researchers and PhD students from nearly 30 different countries to provide expertise in all these areas. Nearly 50 PhD theses will have been completed by the end of the programme. The programme includes fieldwork in Oman, UAE, Spain and the UK to help better understand the reservoir geology in the Middle East supplemented with laboratory work including the first application of clumped isotopes to reservoir descriptions. There are also numerous researchers working on how fluids (e.g., carbon dioxide) flow through rocks of varying porosity and heterogeneity and we have built a dedicated imaging laboratory using X-Ray computer-aided tomography (CT) to observe the properties of carbon dioxide at reservoir conditions in an area of technology now known as “digital rocks”.

Qatar Carbonate and Carbon Storage Research Centre

Bradley Ladewig - Membrane Research in the Barrer Centre

Bradley Ladewig - Membrane Research in the Barrer Centre

Bradley Ladewig talks about the research in his group, based in the Barrer Centre

Bradley Ladewig talks about the research in his group, in the Barrer Centre in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London. 

Molecular Fluid Dynamics

Molecular Fluid Dynamics

Molecules bouncing, jiggling, and flowing together

Everything is made of molecules; and fluids are no exception. The motion of a fluid can be understood in terms of the collective motion of its molecules bouncing, jiggling, and flowing together. In this video, we take a look at the molecular origins of many well-known phenomena, including the flow of a fluid at the nano-scale, the collective motions which lead to turbulent-like structures, the formation of droplets, the impact of introducing chemicals like soap (a surfactant) and the molecular origins of bubbles in boiling phenomena.

Video by Edward Smith in collaboration with Omar Matar, Erich Muller, Richard Craster, Daniele Dini and David Heyes.

Introducing the Institute for Molecular Science & Engineerin

The Institute for Molecular Science & Engineering

Introducing the Institute for Molecular Science & Engineering

The Institute for Molecular Science & Engineering (IMSE) seeks to transform the way in which engineers, scientists and medical researchers build on scientific breakthroughs at the molecular scale to develop novel solutions to challenges faced by society and industry. Find out more

Why paper-thin filters could be key to cutting emissions

Why paper-thin filters could be key to cutting emissions

Audio story with Professor Andrew Livingston on his group's latest membrane research

In this audio story, Professor Andrew Livingston gives listeners the low-down on membranes and how they are used to make many products we need in our daily lives. He also carries out ‘frontier’ research, where he is pushing the boundaries membranes usage forward. He and his team have developed membranes that are made from nanoscopic, twisted, fusilli-like material. He talks about how industries such as the oil and gas sector could be the big winners by adopting this technology, which in the future could cut their emissions and save energy.

 

Membrane sheet making facility

Membrane sheet making facility

Making sheet membranes with Marcus Cook from the Livingston group.

Professor Andrew Livingston - Aims and hallmarks of the Barr

Professor Andrew Livingston - Aims and hallmarks of the Barr

Professor Andrew Livingston, Director of the Barrer Centre provides an overview of the centre

Professor Andrew Livingston, Director of the Barrer Centre provides an overview of the aims and hallmarks of the Barrer Centre. Find out more at http://www.imperial.ac.uk/barrer-centre/

Overview of the Barrer Centre

Overview of the Barrer Centre

Overview of the Barrer Centre at the launch event in October 2016

Professor Andrew Livingston (Director, Barrer Centre), and Dr Bradley Ladewig (Theme leader, Barrer Centre) provide a short overview of the Barrer Centre, its objectives, uniqueness and why they're excited to be a part of this new world-leading research centre in separation materials, science and engineering. Find out more at http://www.imperial.ac.uk/barrer-centre/

Pedal-powered water purification using membranes: the Living

Pedal-powered water purification using membranes

Pedal-powered water purification using membranes: the Livingston Group @ Imperial Festival 2016

The Livingston Group from the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London perform research on the fabrication and application of molecular separation membranes with the overarching aim to reduce energy costs and increase efficiency of chemical separations in industry.
At Imperial Festival 2016 the group demonstrated the power of membranes to purify water by comparing the bicycle driven energy needed to purify water through distillation vs membrane purification ... the membrane bike won!

'Crumpled' filter has potential to slash energy consumption

'Crumpled' filter has potential to slash energy consumption

Imperial researchers have developed advanced membranes which could pave their way for use in industr

Members of Professor Andrew Livingston's group have developed ultrathin (<10 nm) synthetic membranes that can filter small molecules from organic solutes. These nanofilms are extremely permeable, yet very strong. Possible applications of the membranes include purifying organic mixtures in industries such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and oil refining. The research was published in Science.

Impact Acceleration: Flow Chemistry

Impact Acceleration: Flow Chemistry

Dr Mimi Hii and Professor Klaus Hellgardt reveal how flow chemistry will change manufacturing

Professor Klaus Hellgardt from the Department of Chemical Engineering and Dr Mimi Hii from the Department of Chemistry reveal how flow chemistry will change the way in which we manufacture everyday products. Posted online 15 May 2015.

Imperial Festival 2015: pedal-powered purification

Imperial Festival 2015: pedal-powered purification

Dr Patrizia Marchetti challenges us to put purification techniques to the test at 2015's Festival

In this video Dr Patrizia Marchetti, Research Associate in the Department of Chemical Engineering, challenges us to put purification techniques to the test at Imperial Festival 2015Posted online 5 May 2015.

A video on the collaboration between Imperial College and ES

ESD and Energy SmartsOps

A video on the collaboration between Imperial and ESD Simulation Training

A video on the collaboration between Imperial College London and ESD Simulation Training as part of the Energy SmartOps project which is dedicated to finding more efficient ways of using compressors. Featuring interviews with Professor Nina Thornhill and Dr Sara Budinis from the Department. Posted online 16 January 2015.