Sustainable Development add-on module

**This add-on module has been suspended for 2016/17 entry**

Is designed to provide you with the basic skills to incorporate the concepts of sustainable development into all the stages of an engineering project’s development. It is suitable for those who wish to direct their career towards issues of development and redevelopment, especially in the provision of infrastructure, and its renovation and renewal. You will gain the practical tools necessary to apply the principles of engineering for sustainable development in real world contexts.

Can be taken with ...

Comprises three units, taught over the autumn and spring terms, and covered by one 3-hour written examination at the beginning of the summer term, multiple pieces of coursework, both in-class, group and individual and a design guide.  Recent DesignGuides have included an analysis of tourist accommodation in Switzerland, concrete manufacturing processes, packaging design, and transportation projects.  The choice of topics is very broad, as the goal is not to do a detailed analysis of a specific industry, but to gain an appreciation of the general sustainability tools and techniques that might be used for analysing any engineering system.  By contrast, the special projects are more technical and are typically based on work within the core MSc subject (e.g. structures, transport, etc), with sustainability elements in parallel.  A recent example performed a life-cycle assessment of alternative structural designs.

These options comprise 120 contact hours of study and are taken as an alternative to a corresponding amount of core engineering study.

Entry Requirements

If your application to the core MSc programme is successful, you will receive a request to submit a  500-word essay entitled  for consideration for a place on the Sustainable Development module.  The title of the essay is "What is the biggest challenge facing your county's sustainable development in the next twenty years?" The reviewer is looking for the applicant to demonstrate an informed interest in the subject, as well as general writing skills.  Specific technical expertise (e.g. a precise definition of sustainable development) is less important as that is a learning outcome of the course itself.