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How 'dirt' could educate the immune system and help treat asthma


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Under embargo for
18.00
Sunday 4 September 2005

Scientists believe that knowing exactly which type of dirt provides the best education for the immune system, could be key to providing new treatments for diseases such as asthma.

Speaking at the launch of the BA Festival of Science today, Professor Peter Openshaw Opens in new window, explains that a lack of exposure to dirt and common viral infections among children could be behind the rise in the levels of asthma.

Inhaler

Professor Openshaw, from Imperial College London, and based at St Marys Hospital, says: "Although we have seen a dramatic decline in many previously common childhood infections over the past 100 years, we have also seen a considerable rise in the prevalence of diseases such as asthma. The increase in asthma cannot be blamed purely on changes in genetic risk, so must be down to environmental factors."

Scientists have called this the 'hygiene' hypothesis, with a lack of exposure to viruses and other environmental factors meaning children are not able to build up resistance, and can become more susceptible to disease later in life. They also believe having many older siblings, attending day care at an early age, or growing up on a farm can help in promoting resistance to disease.

Studies have shown that most common colds can help protect against wheezing in later childhood, and other childhood infections such as chickenpox also provide a level of protection.

Professor Openshaw adds: "The challenge now is to find ways of reproducing the protective effects of early childhood infections, while reducing the burden of actually getting these infectious diseases. Knowing exactly which dirt provides the best education for the immune system, and how to mimic its affects in a cleaner environment, could be the key to reducing the rise in the prevalence of asthma and related diseases."

Professor Openshaw is a respiratory medicine researcher, looking at immunological responses to diseases such as asthma, the common cold and other lung diseases.

For further information please contact:

Tony Stephenson
Press Officer
Communications Division
Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 6712
Mobile: +44 (0)7753 739766
E-mail: at.stephenson@imperial.ac.uk

Notes to editors:

1. Professor Openshaw is speaking at the launch of the 2005 BA Festival of Science at the Dana Centre, South Kensington, London. The BA Festival will be held 5 - 9 September, at Trinity College, Dublin

2. Consistently rated in the top three UK university institutions, Imperial College London is a world leading science-based university whose reputation for excellence in teaching and research attracts students (11,000) and staff (6,000) of the highest international quality.
Innovative research at the College explores the interface between science, medicine, engineering and management and delivers practical solutions that enhance the quality of life and the environment - underpinned by a dynamic enterprise culture.
Website: www.imperial.ac.uk

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