resume

Miguel Duran Olivencia

 

MSc & PhD Applied Mathematics, University of Washington, USA; Msc Applied Mathematics & Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, UK.

About

I am currently working as a Research Associate in the Complex Multiscale Systems group in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London, headed by Prof. Serafim Kalliadasis

In the past I worked as a postdoc in condensed matter physics at the University of Washington with Professors Anton Andreev and Boris Spivakas Golovin assistant professor of applied mathematics at Northwestern University with Prof. Stephen H. Davis and spent about two years transfering mathematics teaching skills in Australia.

At Michigan State University we worked on swelling theories of elastic materials with Prof. Thomas J.Pence. I am a long-term visitor at the University of Washington where I also submitted my Thesis (advisor Prof. Robert E. O'Malley, Jr.).

Research

In my work I develop mathematical & computational models to describe physical processes at the interface between physics and engineering such as complex fluids, soft solids & interfacial phenomena. I use tools of asymptotic and stochastic analysis, perturbation methods, partial differential equations, dynamical systems and scientific computation. This research is usually driven by as yet unexplained experimental results but I also develop new mathematical concepts that arise in the above areas.

Recent projects include computational and theoretical models for the fluid dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles [2] for cancer research in collaboration with clinicians and biomedical engineers.

My current research at Imperial College London is focused on the hydrodynamics of microengineered microfluidic devices, critical hydrodynamic transitions, collective phenomena and the development of a theoretical-computational framework employing appropriate phase-field models.

Selected publications

  1. E. Kyrkinis and S. H. Davis: "Hydrodynamic theory of liquid slippage on a solid substrate near a moving contact line", 2013 Physical Review Letters, 110 234503
  2. E. Kyrkinis: "Magnetic torque-induced suppression of van-der-Waals-driven thin liquid film rupture", 2017 Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 813 991