Module Leader

Dr Mazdak Ghajari

Dr Shayan Sharifi
s.sharifi@imperial.ac.uk

In FEA, in a hands-on environment, students learn how to use one of the most versatile computational modelling techniques, the FEA, to model complicated mechanical systems, predict their performance and even optimise the design by making informed alterations. The modules includes an experimental lab, where students put their predictions into a test and reflect on their models based on experimental observations. The topics that we cover range from failure of static structures to fatigue, buckling and vibrations.               

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module, students will be better able to:

  •   Predict mechanical response of structures under loading
  •   Troubleshoot finite element models and simulations
  •   Assess the accuracy of finite element simulation results          

 

Description of Content

Truss elements:
  Nodes and degrees of freedom
  Stiffness matrix (local and global)
  FEM equilibrium equation
  Boundary conditions
  Forces
  Singular stiffness matrix
Beam elements:
  Nodes and degrees of freedom
  FEM equilibrium equation
  Boundary conditions
  Forces
  Singular stiffness matrix
  Symmetry
Buckling:
  Critical load
  Mode Shapes
  FEA approach to buckling
Solid elements:
  Nodes and degrees of freedom
  Parent elements
  Shape functions
  Isoparametric elements
  Jacobian matrix
  Negative volume
  Symmetry
Failure analysis:
  Failure theories
  Fatigue
  Safety factor
  Life cycle

 

Module Highlight

Bucatini Water Tower Challenge

Bucatini Water Tower Challenge

Published on 01 March 2017

Our second year Design Engineering students were challenged to design a water tower constructed with an undisclosed biodegradable material for economical construction in the developing world.

Following their finite element analysis and simulation of their design, the students were set a final, surprise challenge: to build a scale model using their secret biodegradable material, bucatini pasta strands. The models were then destructively tested and assessed against their simulations.