Planetary PhD scholarship at Imperial College

The Department of Earth Science and Engineering is seeking a strong and highly motivated candidate for this 3.5 year STFC funded scholarship in planetary science.

A diverse range of projects is available to apply to, which use either petrological, chemical and/or physical methods to study the evolution of planets and the solar system. The list of projects and supervisors can be found below.  The funding is available for applicants with UK residency. For further information about the projects, please contact the potential supervisors directly. Other enquiries can be directed to Amanda Allotey, Postgraduate Research Administrator. 

Planetary PhD Projects - STFC funded scholarship


Electrostatic properties of Lunar and Terrestrial minerals 

It is essential for humankind to use Lunar resources to enable exploration further into space, and for habitation. One of the significant characteristics of Lunar material is its electrostatic properties. This may be exploited as a means to manipulate and separate Lunar minerals.

The project will investigate the differences in the electrostatic behaviour of minerals that are found on Earth and the Moon, with the goal of effecting a separation. It will involve fundamental physics, computational modelling, design and experimentation.

Suitable candidates are likely to have a background in physics or engineering.

For further information, please contact: Dr Kathryn Hadler (k.hadler@imperial.ac.uk) or Professor Jan Cilliers (j.j.cilliers@imperial.ac.uk)

Closing date for Applications: 14 August 2018, Starting date: October 2018 


MIXING AND VOLATILE DEPLETION IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM  [Info Sheet - Early Solar System]

Mark Rehkamper


MICROSPHERULES IN THE GEOLOGICAL RECORD [Info Sheet - Microspherules]

Matt Genge


TOWARDS A ROBUST NON-HEATING METHOD OF PALAEOINTENSITY DETERMINATION FROM METEORITES [muxworthy-heslop-pint-2018]

Adrian Muxworthy and David Heslop (ANU, Canberra)


DETERMINING PALAEOINTENSITIES FROM CHEMICAL REMANENT MAGNETISATIONS IN ROCKS AND METEORITES [muxworthy-heslop-crm-2018]

Adrian Muxworthy and David Heslop (ANU, Canberra)


UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF THERMAL FLUCTUATIONS ON THE FIDELITY OF MAGNETIC RECORDING IN NATURAL SYSTEMS [muxworthy-williams-micromag-2018]

Adrian Muxworthy and Wyn Williams (University of Edinburgh)


CAN EARLY SOLAR NEBULAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BE RECORDED THROUGH IMPACTS? [Info Sheet - Meteoritic]

Adrian Muxworthy (Imperial)Gareth Collins  (Imperial), Dan Eakins (Univ. of Oxford) and Phil Bland (Curtin University)