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  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Duffy OB, Bell RE, Jackson CA-L, Gawthorpe RL, Whipp PSet al., 2015,

    Fault growth and interactions in a multiphase rift fault network: Horda Platform, Norwegian North Sea

    , JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY, Vol: 80, Pages: 99-119, ISSN: 0191-8141
  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Forman LV, Bland PA, Timms NE, Daly L, Collins GS, Davison TM, Trimby PW, Ringer SPet al., 2015,

    RECOVERING THE PRIMORDIAL IMPACT HISTORY OF CHONDRITES IN UNPRECEDENTED DETAIL USING MASSIVE EBSD DATASETS

    , 78th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical-Society, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, ISSN: 1086-9379
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Freitas TMB, Potts DM, Zdravkovic L, 2015,

    Numerical study on the response of two footings at Bothkennar research site

    , GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 65, Pages: 155-168, ISSN: 0016-8505
  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Gavin K, Jardine RJ, Karlsrud K, Lehane BMet al., 2015,

    The Effects of Pile Ageing on the Shaft Capacity of Offshore Piles in Sand.

    , International Symposium Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics, Publisher: CRC Press, Pages: 129-151

    A number of field studies suggest that the axial capacity of driven piles in sand increases withtime. Field test programmes were performed by a number of research groups to examine this aspect of pilebehaviour. The paper presents a summary of the findings from these experiments. It also reviews laboratorypile and element testing performed to provide further insights into the mechanisms controlling pile ageing.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Ghail RC, Mason PJ, Skipper JA, 2015,

    The geological context and evidence for incipient inversion of the London Basin

    , Pages: 3523-3528

    © The authors and ICE Publishing: All rights reserved, 2015. A reappraisal of ground investigation data across London reveal that a range of unexpected ground conditions, encountered in engineering works since Victorian times, may result from the effects of ongoing inversion of the London Basin. Site investigation borehole data and the distribution of river terrace deposits of the Thames and its tributaries reveal a complex pattern of block movements, tilting and dextral transcurrent displacement. Significant displacements (∼10 m) observed in Thames terrace gravels in borehole TQ38SE1565 at the Lower Lea Crossing, showing that movement has occurred within the last ∼100 ka. Restraining bends on reactivated transcurrent faults may explain the occurrence of drift filled hollows, previously identified as fluvially scoured pingos, by faulting and upward migration of water on a flower structure under periglacial conditions. Mapping the location of these features constrains the location of active transcurrent faults and so helps predict the likelihood of encountering hazardous ground conditions during tunnelling and ground engineering.

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Gold PO, Behr WM, Rood D, Sharp WD, Rockwell TK, Kendrick K, Salin Aet al., 2015,

    Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault, southern California

    , JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SOLID EARTH, Vol: 120, Pages: 5639-5663, ISSN: 2169-9313
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Graham GH, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, 2015,

    Three-dimensional modeling of clinoforms in shallow-marine reservoirs: Part 2. Impact on fluid flow and hydrocarbon recovery in fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs

    , AAPG Bulletin, Vol: 99, Pages: 1049-1080, ISSN: 0149-1423

    © 2015. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved. Permeability contrasts associated with clinoforms have been identified as an important control on fluid flow and hydrocarbon recovery in fluvial-dominated deltaic parasequences. However, they are typically neglected in subsurface reservoir models or considered in isolation in reservoir simulation experiments because clinoforms are difficult to capture using current modeling tools. A suite of three-dimensional reservoir models constructed with a novel, stochastic, surface-based clinoform-modeling algorithm and outcrop analog data (Upper Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member, Utah) have been used here to quantify the impact of clinoforms on fluid flow in the context of (1) uncertainties in reservoir characterization, such as the presence of channelized fluvial sandbodies and the impact of bed-scale heterogeneity on vertical permeability, and (2) reservoir engineering decisions, including oil production rate. The proportion and distribution of barriers to flow along clinoforms exert the greatest influence on hydrocarbon recovery; equivalent models that neglect these barriers overpredict recovery by up to 35%. Continuity of channelized sandbodies that cut across clinoform tops and vertical permeability within distal delta-front facies influence sweep within clinothems bounded by barriers. Sweep efficiency is reduced when producing at higher rates over shorter periods, because oil is bypassed at the toe of each clinothem. Clinoforms are difficult to detect using production data, but our results indicate that they significantly influence hydrocarbon recovery and their impact is typically larger than that of other geologic heterogeneities regardless of reservoir engineering decisions. Clinoforms should therefore be included in models of fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs to accurately predict hydrocarbon recovery and drainage patterns.

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Graham GH, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, 2015,

    Three-dimensional modeling of clinoforms in shallow-marine reservoirs: Part 1. Concepts and application

    , AAPG BULLETIN, Vol: 99, Pages: 1013-1047, ISSN: 0149-1423
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Han B, Yang Z, Zdravkovic L, Kontoe Set al., 2015,

    Non-linearity of gravelly soils under seismic compressional deformation based on KiK-net downhole array observations

    , GEOTECHNIQUE LETTERS, Vol: 5, Pages: 287-293, ISSN: 2049-825X
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Han B, Zdravkovic L, Kontoe S, 2015,

    Stability investigation of the Generalised-alpha time integration method for dynamic coupled consolidation analysis

    , COMPUTERS AND GEOTECHNICS, Vol: 64, Pages: 83-95, ISSN: 0266-352X
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Holgate NE, Jackson CA-L, Hampson GJ, Dreyer Tet al., 2015,

    Seismic stratigraphic analysis of the Middle-Upper Jurassic Krossfjord and Fensfjord formations, Troll oil and gas field, northern North Sea

    , Marine and Petroleum Geology, Vol: 68, Pages: 352-380, ISSN: 1873-4073

    The “syn-rift” Middle-to-Late Jurassic Krossfjord and Fensfjord formations, Troll Field, northern North Sea contain a complex distribution of wave- and tide-dominated deltaic, shoreline and shelf depositional environments of varying reservoir potential. Uncertainty exists in depositional models used to explain the spatial and temporal distribution of these depositional environments and the absence of coeval coastal plain deposits. To date, the proposed influence of growing rift-related structures on stratigraphic architectures and sedimentation patterns in the units has been poorly defined. In this study, 3D seismic data are integrated with core, biostratigraphic and wireline-log data to produce a consistent geological interpretation for the formations. Seismic analysis has identified nine parasequences (‘series’) containing NNE-SSW-striking, delta-scale clinoforms that prograded westwards over much of the field. Quantitative analysis highlights an increase in height and dip of clinoforms from proximal to distal locations, coincident with an increase in grain size. Clinoform geometry is sigmoidal, with well-developed topsets that, based on core data, lack subaerial deposits. These geometrical and sedimentological characteristics suggest that a subaqueous delta depositional system deposited the Krossfjord and Fensfjord formations in the Troll Field. In the northeast of the field, clinoforms exhibit highly variable strike and oblique cross-sectional geometries, which suggest that sediment was supplied from here, and then redistributed through southward-directed wave and longshore current activity. Rift-related faulting is recognised to have occurred in thewestern part of the Troll Field only during deposition of the youngest Fensfjord Formation ‘series’, thus challenging the notion that these units are ‘syn-rift’. Seismically imaged clinoforms in the under-explored area south of the Troll Field prograded southward, and a

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Jackson CA-L, Jackson MPA, Hudec MR, 2015,

    Understanding the kinematics of salt-bearing passive margins: A critical test of competing hypotheses for the origin of the Albian Gap, Santos Basin, offshore Brazil

    , GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA BULLETIN, Vol: 127, Pages: 1730-1751, ISSN: 0016-7606
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Jackson CA-L, Jackson MPA, Hudec MR, Rodriguez CRet al., 2015,

    Enigmatic structures within salt walls of the Santos Basin—Part 1: Geometry and kinematics from 3D seismic reflection and well data

    , Journal of Structural Geology, Vol: 75, Pages: 135-162, ISSN: 0191-8141

    Understanding intrasalt structure may elucidate the fundamental kinematics and, ultimately, the mechanics of diapir growth. However, there have been relatively few studies of the internal structure of salt diapirs outside the mining industry because their internal parts are only partly exposed in the field and poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. This study uses 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the São Paulo Plateau, Santos Basin, offshore Brazil to document the variability in intrasalt structural style in natural salt diapirs. We document a range of intrasalt structures that record: (i) initial diapir rise; (ii) rise of lower mobile halite through an arched and thinned roof of denser, layered evaporites, and emplacement of an intrasalt sheet or canopy; (iii) formation of synclinal flaps kinematically linked to emplacement of the intrasalt allochthonous bodies; and (iv) diapir squeezing. Most salt walls contain simple internal anticlines. Only a few salt walls contain allochthonous bodies and breakout-related flaps. All of these are in an area having a density inversion within the autochthonous salt layer, such that upper, anhydrite-rich, layered evaporites are denser than lower, more halite-rich evaporites. We thus interpret that most diapirs rose through simple fold amplification of internal salt stratigraphy but that locally, where a density inversion existed in the autochthonous salt, Rayleigh-Taylor overturn within the growing diapir resulted in the ascent of less dense evaporites into the diapir crest by breaching the internal anticline. This resulted in emplacement of high-level intrsalt allochthonous sheets underlain by breakout-related flaps and steep salt-ascension zones or feeders. Although late-stage regional shortening undoubtedly occurred on the São Paulo Plateau during the Late Cretaceous, we suggest this was only partly responsible for the complex intrasalt deformation. Although based on the Santos Basin, our kinematic

  • BOOK CHAPTER
    Jackson CAL, 2015,

    Growth of a Salt-Detached Normal Fault and Controls on Throw Rate Variability; Gudrun Field, South Viking Graben, Offshore Norway

    , Brae Play, Editors: Turner

    The growth and throw/displacement rate variability on normal faults can reflect fault interaction, plate tectonic forces and, in gravity-driven systems, variations in sediment loading. Because earthquakes may occur as faults slip, it is important to understand what processes influence throw rate variability on normal faults to be able to predict seismic hazards in extensional terranes. Furthermore, the rate of normal fault growth directly controls rift physiography, sediment erosion, dispersal and deposition, and the distribution and stratigraphic architecture of syn-rift reservoirs. Instrumental (e.g. geodetic) data may constrain the very short-term (i.e. days to years) throw rate history of normal faults, whereas palaeoearthquake data may provide important information on medium-term (i.e. 103-105 years) rates. Constraining longer-term (i.e. >106 Myr) variations typically requires the use of seismic reflection data, although their application may be problematic because of poor seismic resolution and the absence of, or poor age constraints on, coeval growth strata. In this study I use 3D seismic reflection and borehole data to constrain the growth and long-term throw rate variability on a gravity-driven, salt-detached normal fault (Middle-to-Late Jurassic) in the South Viking Graben, offshore Norway, and to assess the impact of throw rate variability on the thickness and character of syn-rift reservoirs. I recognise five kinematic phases: (i) Phase 1 (early Callovian) - fault initiation and a phase of moderate fault throw rates (0.06 mm yr-1); (ii) Phase 2 (early Callovian-to-end Callovian) - fault inactivity, during which time the fault was buried by sediment; (iii) Phase 3 (early Oxfordian-to-late Oxfordian) - fault reactivation and a phase of moderate throw rates (up to 0.03 mm yr-1); (iv) Phase 4 (late Oxfordian-to-end Oxfordian) – a marked increase in throw rate (up to 0.27 mm yr-1); and (v) Phase 5 (early Kimmeridgian-to-middle Volgian) – a decl

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Jackson MD, Percival JR, Mostaghiml P, Tollit BS, Pavlidis D, Pain CC, Gomes JLMA, El-Sheikh AH, Salinas P, Muggeridge AH, Blunt MJet al., 2015,

    Reservoir Modeling for Flow Simulation by Use of Surfaces, Adaptive Unstructured Meshes, and an Overlapping-Control-Volume Finite-Element Method

    , SPE RESERVOIR EVALUATION & ENGINEERING, Vol: 18, Pages: 115-132, ISSN: 1094-6470
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Jacobs CT, Avdis A, Mouradian SL, Piggott MDet al., 2015,

    Integrating research data management into geographical information systems

    , CEUR Workshop Proceedings, Vol: 1529, Pages: 7-17, ISSN: 1613-0073

    Ocean modelling requires the production of high-fidelity com-putational meshes upon which to solve the equations of motion. The production of such meshes by hand is often infeasible, considering the complexity of the bathymetry and coastlines. The use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is therefore a key component to discretising the region of interest and producing a mesh appropriate to resolve the dynamics. However, all data abociated with the production of a mesh must be provided in order to contribute to the overall recomputability of the subsequent simulation. This work presents the integration of re-search data management in QMesh, a tool for generating meshes using GIS. The tool uses the PyRDM library to provide a quick and easy way for scientists to publish meshes, and all data required to regenerate them, to persistent online repositories. These repositories are abigned unique identifiers to enable proper citation of the meshes in journal articles.

  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Jacobs CT, Avdis A, Mouradian SL, Piggott MDet al., 2015,

    Integrating Research Data Management into Geographical Information Systems

    , http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1529/, 5th International Workshop on Semantic Digital Archives (SDA 2015), Pages: 7-17

    Ocean modelling requires the production of high-fidelity computational meshes upon which to solve the equations of motion. The production of such meshes by hand is often infeasible, considering the complexity of the bathymetry and coastlines. The use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is therefore a key component to discretising the region of interest and producing a mesh appropriate to resolve the dynamics. However, all data associated with the production of a mesh must be provided in order to contribute to the overall recomputability of the subsequent simulation. This work presents the integration of research data management in QMesh, a tool for generating meshes using GIS. The tool uses the PyRDM library to provide a quick and easy way for scientists to publish meshes, and all data required to regenerate them, to persistent online repositories. These repositories are assigned unique identifiers to enable proper citation of the meshes in journal articles.

  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Jacobs CT, Goldin TJ, Collins GS, Piggott MD, Kramer SC, Melosh HJ, Wilson CRG, Allison PAet al., 2015,

    An improved quantitative measure of the tendency for volcanic ash plumes to form in water: implications for the deposition of marine ash beds

    , JOURNAL OF VOLCANOLOGY AND GEOTHERMAL RESEARCH, Vol: 290, Pages: 114-124, ISSN: 0377-0273
  • JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Jacobs CT, Piggott MD, 2015,

    Firedrake-Fluids v0.1: numerical modelling of shallow water flows using an automated solution framework

    , GEOSCIENTIFIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 8, Pages: 533-547, ISSN: 1991-959X
  • CONFERENCE PAPER
    Jardine RJ, Brosse A, Coop MR, Hosseini-Kamal Ret al., 2015,

    Shear strength and stiffness anisotropy of geologically aged stiff clays.

    , International Symposium on Deformation Behaviour of Geomaterials, Publisher: IOS Press, Pages: 156-191

    This paper considers the deformation behaviour of four geologically aged, medium-plasticity, heavily overconsolidated stiff clays that affect a broad swathe of infrastructure projects in the SE of the United Kingdom. Static triaxial and hollow cylinder stress path experiments on high quality samples are examined along with dynamic multi-axial bender element and resonant-column measurements. Patterns of undrained shear strength anisotropy are revealed that are governed by the clays' meso and micro-structures. The clays are brittle in shear and their stiffness characteristics are shown to be markedly anisotropic, highly non-linear and pressure dependent. The results obtained have many implications for practical geotechnical engineering.

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