Fellowship Opportunities

Application Process

We welcome and encourage applications for Fellowships from both Imperial Researchers and from Researchers at other institutes.

If you see an opportunity to apply for a Fellowship based in the Department of Life Sciences, you should first make contact and discuss your application with a potential sponsor who is currently at Imperial. A list of Research Themes, Research Groups and contacts is available from this link (Research Themes).

We ask that you submit your CV and a short summary of your proposed project to your sponsor, who will forward your application, with a letter of support, to the Departmental Fellowships and Honours Committee for review and consideration with regards to the current departmental activities and priorities. A decision will then be made whether your application will be supported by the Department. Feedback will be available in all cases.

If you have any queries, please email: dols-fhc@imperial.ac.uk

Examples of current Fellowships that are available include:

Supported Fellowships
 Funder Call Opens/Outline Full Application Date Shortlisting Link for Info
Wellcome Trust/ The Royal Society Sir Henry Dale Fellowship  07/08/2017  19/10/2017  Feb 2018 Sir Henry Dale
Wellcome Trust Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship  16/10/2017  15/12/2017  Apr 2018 Henry Wellcome
BBSRC David Phillips Fellowship  Early 2018  May 2018  Oct 2018 David Phillips
MRC Career Development Awards May 2017  14/09/2017  Feb 2018 Career Development Award 
EC Marie Curie Individual Fellowships  May 2017  14/09/2017  Feb 2018 Marie Sklodowska-Curie 
CRUK Career Development Fellowship  21/08/2017  27/11/2017  Mar 2018 Career Development Fellowship 
The Royal Society Newton International Fellowship  Jan 2018     Newton International Fellowship 
The Royal Society University Research Fellowship    Sep 2017  Apr 2018 University Research Fellowship  
Information for Sponsors

If you are planning on sponsoring an applicant, please submit a short reference and an outline of the support you will be providing to the applicant to the Fellowships and Honours Committee, along with the applicant's CV and short summary. The Fellowships and Honours Committee will then assess the fit of the applicant to the Department's activities.

Lectureships

We have a strong history of being able to offer our Research Fellows tenure within the Department of Life Sciences as Lecturers/Readers. Fellows that have been successful include: Katerina Artavanis-Tsakonas, James Murray, Cristina Banks-Leite, Abigail Clements, Giorgio Gilestro and Nadia Guerra.

PhD Opportunities

Ultrafast protein structural dynamics with X-ray Free Electron Lasers and Optical Lasers

A 3 year EPSRC-funded PhD studentship is offered in the group of Jasper van Thor at Imperial College London in the area of ultrafast X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and ultrafast laser science. XFEL’s are revolutionising structural biology to add the time domain to atomic resolution information, with a time resolution currently possible of ~100 femtoseconds using the pump-probe technique. Experiments at X-ray Free Electron Lasers will involve data analysis and experimental configuration in a team-based setting to execute femtosecond time-resolved X-ray crystallography experiments. These are pump-probe experiments applied to the ‘Serial Femtosecond Crystallography’ method. In the home laboratory the research will also involve ultrafast spectroscopy of oriented single protein crystals to measure and control femtosecond reactions. In collaboration with the Jon Marangos group in the Physics Department there will be additional opportunities to join X-ray Free Electron Laser experiments to gain experience with experiments relevant to atomic, molecular and optical physics

Eligibility and how to apply:

Applicants should have a BSc degree at 2:1 level or better, either in Physics or in Chemistry and a relevant Masters degree in Physical Sciences ideally in ultrafast optics or laser science. Preference will be given to applicants with proven experience in coding, including Python, and who are comfortable with data handling and computation and have experimental experience. In exceptional cases Life Science graduates will be considered, but need to demonstrate ability and experience in computing and Physical Sciences methodologies as well as have excellent Mathematics skills.

Only UK and EU nationals who meet the UK residency requirements are eligible to apply (minimum of three years of continuous residency in the UK immediately prior to the start of the PhD). Non-EU nationals are not eligible.

Initial applications should include a full CV, names, addresses and contact details of two academic referees, and a personal statement (500 words max). These should be submitted to Jasper van Thor (j.vanthor@imperial.ac.uk)

Enquiries may also be made to Jasper van Thor (j.vanthor@imperial.ac.uk)

Deadline for submission of applications is 10th February 2017

Selected References

Pande K, et al. (2016), Femtosecond structural dynamics drives the trans/cis isomerization in photoactive yellow protein, SCIENCE, Vol: 352, Pages: 725-729

Hutchison et al. (2016) Photocycle populations with femtosecond excitation of crystalline photoactive yellow protein, Chemical Physics Letters, Vol: 654, Pages: 63-71

C. Hutchison and J.J. van Thor (2016) Populations and coherence in femtosecond time resolved X-ray crystallography of the Photoactive Yellow Protein. Int J Phys Chem. In Press

van Thor JJ and Madsen A, (2015), A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography, Structural Dynamics, Vol: 2, Pages: 014102-014102. 

ESR7 Structure determination of plant borate transporters

Supervisor Dr Bernadette Byrne

Applications are invited for an Early Stage Researcher (ESR)/PhD studentship position funded by The Marie SkÅ‚odowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) Innovative Training Networks (ITN) programme “Rationalising Membrane Protein Crystallisation” (RAMP) and based in the Molecular Membrane Group at Imperial College London.

 This is biochemistry/structural biology project which focuses on utilising apply rational crystallisation in order to obtain solve structures of medically and agriculturally important membrane transporters. The PhD project is one of 12 in this training network. Other PhD students in the network will work with other membrane proteins, develop advanced methods for crystallisation and modelling of the membrane protein crystallisation process.

 Integral membrane proteins have essential cellular functions, however our understanding of their mechanism of action is limited due to difficulties in determination of high-resolution structures. Obtaining well diffracting crystals remains a one of the major hurdles in the structure determination process. This project will involve expression, isolation and characterisation of a range of transporter proteins with particular focus on the plant borate transporters building on existing expertise in the group with a these and other membrane proteins. As a secondary project, another rmembrane protein, UapA, maybe included (Alguel et al, Nat Comms. 2016). In this case we will aim to crystallise this protein in complex with a range of different native and non-native substrates. The high quality protein produced will be submitted to crystallisation trials using a range of approaches including ones available in-house and others available in the laboratories of network partners. Optimised crystals will be screened at national and international synchrotrons. The project will involve secondments in the laboratory of Prof Martin Caffrey, Trinity College Dublin, an expert in the application of lipidic cubic phase crystallisation to membrane proteins and Dr Tony Saville, Molecular Dimensions, Oxford a specialist in the development of cutting edge crystallisation screens and tools.

 Applicants should have a BSc in Biochemistry/Chemistry or related discipline and an associated Masters or an equivalent level of professional qualifications or experience. Knowledge and experience of membrane proteins is desirable but not essential.

Candidates must comply with both EU and Imperial College eligibility criteria. Due to the EU rules to promote mobility, you are not eligible for a position in a country where you have lived (worked, studied) for more than 12 months in the last 3 years. So for this position you are eligible, unless you have studied or worked in the UK for more than 12 of the last 36 months. For applicants finishing or who have just finished their degree, this typically means that you can be graduating from any university except a UK university.

Further details on this project are available from Dr. Bernadette Byrne (b.byrne@imperial.ac.uk). Further details about Imperial College and the Departments of Life Sciences are available at www.imperial.ac.uk; http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/lifesciences.

Details of how to apply are available on the RAMP website, www.ramp.itn.eu.

Modelling Multicellularity: deciphering the self-assembly rules which govern the transition from single-cell to multicellular life

Supervised by Dr. Robert Endres (theory) and Dr. Michalis Barkoulas (experimentalist) Department of Life Sciences & Centre for Integrative Systems Biology
Imperial College, London

The overall aim of this project is to decipher the self-assembly rules which govern the transition from single-cell to multicellular life. The study will have the potential to elucidate the fundamental physical principles of how spatial information and complexity emerge during embryonic development.

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be sent to Dr. Endres ()

How to apply:


Please email Dr. Endres () and include in your application:

A cover letter
Your CV
Your transcript (available to-date)
At least two references sent directly to Dr. Endres from the referees

Full applications made before 31 January 2017 will be considered at any time.

Funding and eligibility:


Eligibility criteria: Imperial College normally requires applicants for 3-year PhD positions to already have a Masters degree, at Merit level or above, by the start of the project. The BSc degree must be at 2:1 level or better in a relevant subject area such as physics, mathematics or bioengineering. Studentships funded by UK Research Councils generally apply only to UK students or EU students who have been in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the PhD. An exception is when the student is self-funded, and so the studentship can at least be used to pay Home/EU-level university fees.

http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/web/FILES/Guidelines/studentship_eligibility.pdf

Overseas candidates are not eligible for this studentship.  

Dependence of the stability of steady states on complexity in changing Earth system

The Earth’s climate is driven out of equilibrium by the incoming energy from the sun. This huge amount of energy, on average about 280 Watt/m2, not only determines dynamics of ocean and atmospheric currents, but uniquely on earth also the evolution of life, the emergence of ecosystems, and the rise of biodiversity. How stable is the current steady state on earth? Are there alternative states the system could accidentally switch to, especially when changing key parameters? The aim of this project is to apply recent ideas from non-equilibrium statistical physics to the Earth system in a changing climate.

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be sent to Dr. Endres ()

How to apply:


Please email Dr. Endres () and include in your application:
A cover letter
Your CV
Your transcript (available to-date)
At least two references sent directly to Dr. Endres from the referees

Full applications made before 16 January 2017 will be considered at any time.

Funding and eligibility:


Imperial College normally requires applicants for 3-year PhD positions to already have a Masters degree, at Merit level or above, by the start of the project. The BSc degree must be at 2:1 level or better in a relevant subject area such as physics, mathematics or bioengineering. Studentships funded by UK Research Councils generally apply only to UK students or EU students who have been in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the PhD. An exception is when the student is self-funded, and so the studentship can at least be used to pay Home/EU-level university fees.

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/grantham/education/science-and-solutions-for-a-changing-planet-dtp/studentship-opportunities/

Overseas candidates are not eligible for this studentship. 

Entropy production as a driver for increased functioning of complex ecosystems

Supervised by Dr. Robert Endres, Dr. Guy-Bart Stan, Dr. Samraat Pawar Imperial College, London

The Earth’s climate is driven out of equilibrium by the incoming energy from the sun. This huge amount of energy, on average about 280 Watt/m2, not only determines dynamics of ocean and atmospheric currents, but uniquely on earth also the evolution of life, the emergence of ecosystems, and the rise of biodiversity. How stable is the current steady state on earth? Are there alternative states the system could accidentally switch to, especially when changing key parameters?

In this project, the student will investigate how entropy production determines (or is an consequence of) the complexity, stability, and functioning of species-species interaction networks with/without climatic forcing. One feasible approach would be to use simplified dynamical models from ecology and earth science with multi-stability. This will allow the student to study the stability of the steady states and their transitions in presence of intrinsic fluctuations. Specifically, close attention will be given to the influence of the steady state’s underlying complexity on the stability, and the emergence of biological system function. Subsequently, the stability of the steady states (or fitness in biological systems) will be analyzed under changing external conditions (external, climatic forcing). Once relatively simple systems are understood, the student will be able to develop more realistic ecosystem models with climate forcing to make predictions about potentially catastrophic shifts in their behaviour. The models will be parameterized with real data from the global Biotraits database developed at ICL, which contains data on the individual-level physiology of thousands of species. The predictions, about the link between climatic forcing, entropy, complexity and functioning will be testable using new and burgeoning data from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem experiments at Silwood Park as well as global datasets such as FluxNet.

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be sent to Dr. Endres ()

How to apply:


Please email Dr. Endres () and include in your application:
A cover letter
Your CV
Your transcript (available to-date)
At least two references sent directly to Dr. Endres from the referees

Full applications made before 19 January 2017 will be considered at any time.

Funding and eligibility:


Imperial College normally requires applicants for 3-year PhD positions to already have a Masters degree, at Merit level or above, by the start of the project. The BSc degree must be at 2:1 level or better in a relevant subject area such as physics, mathematics or bioengineering. Studentships funded by UK Research Councils generally apply only to UK students or EU students who have been in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the PhD. An exception is when the student is self-funded, and so the studentship can at least be used to pay Home/EU-level university fees.

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/qmee-cdt/

Overseas candidates are not eligible for this studentship.


The devil is in the detail: the importance of understanding intraspecific responses to tropical deforestation

It is generally assumed that species do not show intraspecific variation in their responses to environmental change. This assumption is at the basis of the indicator species concept, and it is part of the reasoning behind Red Lists. However, recent evidence obtained from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil indicates that there is a large variability in species responses to habitat loss (Mayor et al. in prep). When comparing species responses across different regions of this biome, few of the analysed species presented same levels of sensitivity, and the majority shifted from being negatively affected to being positively affected by habitat loss. To date, we do not know what are the possible drivers of such patterns, yet understanding these differences is key for effective conservation planning. In this project, the student will assess the relative roles of the following mechanisms underlying intraspecific variation in sensitivity to habitat loss: (1) landscape age (time since deforestation) and influence of additional disturbances (e.g. Prugh et al. 2008 PNAS), (2) climatic suitability (Pérez-Tris et al. 2000 J Biogeo.), (3) species interactions at the community level (e.g. Angelini et al. 2016 Nature Comms.), and (4) drift (Hubbell 2001, Princeton Univ.). Specific hypotheses are below. For any given species, we expect that individuals will be less sensitive to habitat loss if:

1-            They are sampled in landscapes that were deforested more recently or landscapes under weaker pressure from external environmental disturbances (e.g. roads, hunting, type of matrix).

2-            They are sampled in areas of higher climatic suitability.

3-            They have weak interactions with remaining species in the community. This hypothesis is based on the idea that competition becomes a stronger stressor as resources reduce with habitat loss. Also, facultative mutualistic species may be more resilient to environmental changes, while obligate mutualism may confer lower resilience (particularly if one of the species is more sensitive to habitat change).

4-            Their local population size was declining. This alternative neutral hypothesis assumes that variation in sensitivity across regions is mostly due to demographic drift.

The student will build on an existing database of species responses to habitat loss and use a range of models to test these hypotheses. Hypotheses 1 and 2 will require the use of GIS techniques and species distribution modelling (likely an ensemble model using Maxent, GLM and random forests) to assess climate suitability. Hypotheses 3 and 4 will be assessed through the use of the Tangled Nature (TaNa) model defined by Christensen et al. (2002 in J Theor. Biol.). The TaNa model is an individual-based model that explicitly incorporates parameters related to species interactions, drift, speciation and dispersal, and unlike any other model allows one to also include intraspecific variation in traits. The TaNa model was developed by researchers working on complex systems theory and uses statistical mechanics to study emergent phenomena arising from the many interactions taking place at a microscopic level (Jensen & Arcaute 2010 Ann NY Acad. Scie). This model is incredibly powerful and will allow the student to compare simulate patterns (with a known mechanism) against empirical patterns. The results from this project have clear conservation importance, and may help design next generation of conservation and management policies.

The successful student will be jointly supervised by Dr. Cristina Banks-Leite from Imperial College (Life Sciences), Dr. Manuela Gonzalez-Suarez from University of Reading, and Prof. Henrik Jensen from Imperial College (Maths).

For more information please see: http://www.imperial.ac.uk/qmee-cdt/how-to-apply/

How to apply: Please send your CV, a cover letter explaining why you are interested in the CDT and on this project, and the names and e-mail addresses of two academic referees to c.banks@imperial.ac.uk by the 19 Jan 2017. At least one of referees should have supervised you on a previous research project.

Deadline: 19 Jan 2017

Student eligibility: Studentships will last for 3.5 years full-time or the equivalent period part-time. Most applicants will have, or be about to obtain, a Masters qualification (MSc, MRes or MSci/MMath) and a 2.1 or higher undergraduate degree. Exceptional students at Bachelors level without a Masters will also be considered. Relevant post-graduate experience will also be taken into account. NERC-funded studentships are subject to RCUK eligibility requirements, which are outlined under “Student eligibility” and “Residence Requirements” on the RCUK website. In short you should be a citizen of the UK or other EU country and have been residing in the UK for the last 3 years (apart from temporary or occasional absences).

Disulfide bond formation in Pseudomonas species: Unravelling the adaptation of a classical pathway into a virulence aid.

BBSRC-funded 3 year PhD studentship

Supervisors: Dr Despoina Mavridou and Prof Alain Filloux

Project description:

Disulfide bonds are ubiquitous covalent linkages, essential for the stability of hundreds of proteins. Despite their simplicity, they are formed by dedicated protein systems in all organisms. In Gram-negative bacteria, the formation of these bonds is catalysed by the Disulfide bond (DSB) formation system which is also responsible for folding most factors that enable bacteria to be efficient pathogens. More importantly, the DSB systems of pathogens are divergent compared to non-pathogenic bacteria as they contain multiple copies of key DSB players. We propose that this understudied adaptation of the DSB system allows bacteria to efficiently handle protein substrates related to pathogenesis.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is resistant to most available antibiotics, causing financial stress to healthcare systems worldwide. Preliminary analysis of Pseudomonas species clearly revealed divergent DSB systems. We will assess the role of these proteins for Pseudomonas virulence and evaluate whether they are promising targets for the development of novel antibiotics. We are proposing the use of bioinformatics analysis for the characterisation of DSB proteins in all Pseudomonas species in combination with experimental identification of the substrates of each additional atypical DSB analogue in Pseudomonas aeruginosa to establish the involvement of the DSB system in the pathogenesis of this organism.

Dr Mavridou’s expertise in disulfide bond formation and periplasmic protein biochemistry will be complemented by Prof. Filloux’s knowledge of the lifestyle and adaptation of Pseudomonads in physiological host and non-host environments. In addition to standard biochemical and microbiological techniques, the project will require specialised biochemical assays for the identification of the substrates and the role of the DSB system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Mavridou lab) as well as assessment of the contribution of the DSB proteins in Pseudomonas virulence through phenotypic assays on biofilm formation, type VI secretion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model (Filloux lab).This breadth of techniques will allow for an interdisciplinary approach where basic protein biochemistry and structure-to-function-studies will be used in the development of potential organism-specific antibacterial strategies.

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be addressed to Dr Despoina Mavridou, d.mavridou@imperial.ac.uk

How to apply:

Please email Dr Despoina Mavridou, d.mavridou@imperial.ac.uk, and include in your application:

  • A cover letter
  • Your CV
  • Your transcript (available to-date)
  • At least two academic references must be sent directly to Dr Mavridou from the referees

Full applications made before 28th February 2017 will be considered at any time.

Funding and eligibility

The studentship covers: (i) an annual tax-free stipend at the standard Research Council rate, (ii) contribution towards research costs, and (iii) tuition fees at the UK/EU rate. Imperial College normally requires applicants for 3-year PhD positions to already have a Masters degree, at Merit level or above, by the start of the project. The BSc degree must be at 2:1 level or better in a relevant biosciences subject. Exceptional candidates without a Masters degree might be considered.

Studentships funded by UK Research Councils generally apply only to UK students or EU students who have been in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the PhD.

http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/web/FILES/Guidelines/studentship_eligibility.pdf

Overseas candidates are not eligible for this studentship.  

Non-pathogenic Type III secretion system-based tools for delivery of bioactive proteins into plant cells.

BBSRC-funded 3 year PhD studentship

Project Description

As an alternative to transgenic plants, we wish to deliver bioactive proteins directly inside plant cells. The aim of the PhD is to evaluate the potential for an innovative biotechnological route to generate crop plants with modified development, such as altered flowering time, or with enhanced stress and disease resistance. Candidate proteins will be screened for efficiency of entry into cells expressing reporter constructs enabling quantitative readouts.

The strategy will focus on engineered Type III secretion system (T3SS) platforms to deliver proteins of interest into the cytoplasm. Literature shows feasibility of insertion of the entire T3SS cluster into the non-pathogenic and effector-less bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, the aim here is to avoid disease and instead deliver non-effector proteins as the cargo. Designs may include adding T3SS secretion signal sequences to protein of interest and generating fusions to inactivated but still secreted effectors. Small effectors would be selected to minimize constraints on delivery and function of the cargo, avoiding those with known cytotoxicity. You would mutate or delete functional domains, confirm that secretion is unimpaired, then make fusions to protein of interest. The final phases would be in planta tracking of protein movement, and evaluation of development or defence phenotypes.

The project is jointly supervised by Dr. Colin Turnbull (plant biology) and Prof. Martin Buck (molecular microbiology), Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, based at the South Kensington campus in central London. There is potential for an industry link to this project, which will be discussed with shortlisted candidates at interview.

Informal enquiries are welcome – please contact Dr Colin Turnbull (c.turnbull@imperial.ac.uk)

How to apply

Send your application by email direct to Dr. Turnbull (c.turnbull@imperial.ac.uk) and include the following:

  • A cover letter
  • Your CV
  • Your academic transcript(s)
  • At least two academic references should be sent directly to Dr. Turnbull by your referees

Full applications made before 10th February 2017 will be considered.

Funding and eligibility:

Eligibility criteria: Imperial College normally requires applicants for 3-year PhD positions to already have a Masters degree, at Merit level or above, by the start of the project. The BSc degree must be at 2:1 level or better in biological sciences or a related and relevant subject area. Experience in plant and microbial sciences research is an advantage but not essential. This studentship is funded through a BBSRC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP). Studentships funded by UK Research Councils generally apply only to UK students or EU students who have been in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the PhD. An exception is when the student is self-funded, and so the studentship can at least be used to pay Home/EU-level university fees.

http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/web/FILES/Guidelines/studentship_eligibility.pdf

Non-EU overseas candidates are not eligible for this studentship. 

EPSRC-funded PhD project to investigate the Non-Equilibrium Statistical Physics of Stem Cell Differentiation

The aim of the proposed project is to build on recent advances in molecular systems biology and non-equilibrium statistical physics to describe gene regulation networks and their dynamics over the course of the differentiation process. Statistical physics can describe e.g. the states of regulatory networks corresponding to certain cell-types or fates (e.g. embryonic stem cell vs neural progenitor); non-equilibrium statistical physics goes beyond this and allows us to investigate how these networks are remodeled over the course of differentiation, development more generally, or in response to environmental stimuli.

This project would suit candidates with experience and interests in computational and theoretical physics, applied mathematics, statistics, or computational biology. A masters degree, e.g.  in bioinformatics, systems biology, computational physics or statistics, is required. There is tremendous scope for applying concepts from statistical physics in biology, and this project, which will involve collaborations with the groups of Heike Siebert (FU Berlin) and Alfonso-Martinez-Arias (Cambridge), provides an ideal opportunity for enthusiastic young scientists wishing to conduct multi-disciplinary research.

How to apply:

Please email Professor Michael Stumpf (m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk) and include in your application:

  • A cover letter
  • Your CV
  • Your transcript (available to-date)
  • At least two references sent directly to Professor Stumpf from the referees

Full applications made before 10th May 2017 will be considered at any time.

Funding and eligibility:

Eligibility criteria: Imperial College normally requires applicants for 3-year PhD positions to already have a Masters degree, at Merit level or above, by the start of the project. The BSc degree must be at 2:1 level or better in a relevant subject area. Studentships funded by UK Research Councils generally apply only to UK students or EU students who have been in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the PhD.

BBSRC 4-year iCASE PhD studentship - Conformational Changes and Agglomeration in Biopharmaceuticals Using Spectroscopic Imaging in Microfluidics

Applications are invited for a BBSRC iCASE PhD studentship in Chemical Engineering and Bioprocessing. This studentship is an initiative between the Departments of Life Sciences and Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London and is additionally supported by our Industrial Partner, a major pharmaceutical company, to address key issues in Bioprocessing and Pharmaceutical Sciences

The student will apply spectroscopic chemical imaging to the study of protein behaviour in a range of different conditions with a particular focus on agglomeration of biopharmaceuticals in Microfluidic set-ups. The project will explore the development and application of novel spectroscopic imaging methodology to study a range of proteins and therapeutic antibodies. As part of the project, the imaging methodology for simultaneous high-throughput analysis of proteins will be used as well as chemical imaging of protein solutions in microfluidic devices.

This project is an exciting piece of science with broad implications for our understanding of protein behaviour and stability. It builds upon leading collaborative research efforts of two teams that have applied FTIR spectroscopic imaging to key bioprocessing problems. The overall aim is to further develop applications of a novel imaging methodology for use in a wide range of industrial and academic settings.

Funding and Eligibility:

Applicants should have a BSc degree, at 2:1 level or better, and a Masters degree, at Merit level or better, in physics/chemistry/biochemistry/chemical engineering or related discipline or an equivalent level of professional qualifications or experience. Exceptional students without a Masters may be considered. Knowledge and experience of spectroscopic methods (FTIR or Raman) and their applications to study proteins as well as microfluidics is desirable but not compulsory. .Only UK and EU students who meet the BBSRC UK residency requirements are eligible to apply (minimum of three years of continuous residency in the UK immediately prior to the start of the PhD). Non-EU nationals are not eligible.

The studentship covers: (i) 4 years annual tax-free stipend at the standard Research Council rate, (ii) 4 years contribution towards research costs, and (iii) 4 years tuition fees at the UK/EU rate.

How to apply:

Further details on this project are available from principal supervisors Prof. Sergei G. Kazarian (s.kazarian@imperial.ac.uk) in the Department of Chemical Engineering (www.imperial.ac.uk/vsci) and Dr. Bernadette Byrne (b.byrne@imperial.ac.uk) in the Department of Life Sciences.

Further details about Imperial College and the Departments of Life Sciences and Chemical Engineering are available at www.imperial.ac.uk; http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/lifesciences; http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/chemicalengineering

Interested candidates should send their application to Prof. Sergei G. Kazarian via email (s.kazarian@imperial.ac.uk)  by the 10th April 2017. Completed applications should include a full curriculum vitae, and the names and contact details of two academic referees. The studentship is available to start in October 2017.