Citation

BibTex format

@article{Oldfield:2014:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.10.016,
author = {Oldfield, MJ and Burrows, C and Kerl, J and Frasson, L and Parittotokkaporn, T and Beyrau, F and Rodriguez, y Baena F},
doi = {10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.10.016},
journal = {Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials},
pages = {50--60},
title = {Highly resolved strain imaging during needle insertion: results with a novel biologically inspired device},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.10.016},
volume = {30},
year = {2014}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Percutaneous needle insertions are a common part of minimally invasive surgery. However, the insertion process is necessarily disruptive to the substrate. Negative side effects are migration of deep-seated targets and trauma to the surrounding material. Mitigation of these effects is highly desirable, but relies on a detailed understanding of the needle–tissue interactions, which are difficult to capture at a sufficiently high resolution.Here, an adapted Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique is used to quantify mechanical behaviour at the sliding interface, with resolution of measurement points which is better than 0.5 mm, representing a marked improvement over the state of the art. A method for converting the Eulerian description of DIC output to Lagrangian displacements and strains is presented and the method is validated during the simple insertion of a symmetrical needle into a gelatine tissue phantom. The needle is comprised of four axially interlocked quadrants, each with a bevel tip. Tests are performed where the segments are inserted into the phantom simultaneously, or in a cyclic sequence taking inspiration from the unique insertion strategy associated to the ovipositor of certain wasps. Data from around the needle–tissue interface includes local strain variations, material dragged along the needle surface and relaxation of the phantom, which show that the cyclic actuation of individual needle segments is potentially able to mitigate tissue strain and could be used to reduce target migration.
AU - Oldfield,MJ
AU - Burrows,C
AU - Kerl,J
AU - Frasson,L
AU - Parittotokkaporn,T
AU - Beyrau,F
AU - Rodriguez,y Baena F
DO - 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.10.016
EP - 60
PY - 2014///
SN - 1751-6161
SP - 50
TI - Highly resolved strain imaging during needle insertion: results with a novel biologically inspired device
T2 - Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.10.016
UR - http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000331493900005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=1ba7043ffcc86c417c072aa74d649202
UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1751616113003433
VL - 30
ER -