The course is flexible and modular and is available as a full- or part-time MSc delivered over one or two years respectively. There are also full-time and part-time Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) options.

MSC, PGdip, PGcert, short courses

MSc

All Master’s students will take part in seven compulsory modules and one optional/elective module from a choice of five.  MSc students will also complete a 14 week full-time / one-year part-time research project. 

Compulsory modules

  • Core Concepts in Human Genetics and Genomics, providing all of the basic genomic science knowledge required by later modules including genomic architecture, regulatory systems, genetic variation, function and how this impacts upon disease processes and clinical outcomes. This module runs in October at the beginning of the academic year.

  • Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening and Treatment (delivered by the Institute of Cancer Research) will explain the principles of cancer genomics, including predisposition, diagnosis, classification, treatment and patient monitoring with particular emphasis on how genomic analysis impacts these factors and the ethical issues relevant to cancer. 

  • Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease will explain how pathogen genomics can inform the epidemiology of infections, impact upon drug development and resistance, lead to novel diagnostics/therapeutics/stratified healthcare, and provide insights into host susceptibilities to infection.

  • Omics Technologies and their Application to Genomic Medicine, providing an in-depth description of the genomic techniques that are used to assess genomic variation in clinical problems. It will allow you to critically evaluate which techniques might be used and their limitations in analysing different disease states.

  • Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Applied Genomics will explain the principles and subtleties of ethics in evaluating genetic/genomic data with an emphasis on emerging genomics technologies and the ways that ethics issues are handled in various countries.  

  • Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Diseases will explain different types of genetic variation, their contribution to rare and complex disease, how they are detected (with particular emphasis upon the 100,000 Genomes Project), interpreted and communicated. 

  • Either Bioinformatics, Quality Control, Analysis & Interpretation of Genome Sequencing Data, providing the principles of computational DNA sequence analysis, including sequence alignment methods and statistical tests, to identify and correctly communicate pathogenic mutations and assess possible functions through database and network programs) OR the less computationally intense Genomics and the Patient modulewhich will concentrate on the identification and interpretation of final Next Gen DNA sequencing reports with an emphasis on calculating genetic risk and ethical considerations.

Optional modules

  • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Medicine will explain how genomic approaches can be used to understand the mechanisms of differential drug responses and reactions, and to inform patient stratification. An emphasis will be placed upon the current limitations and future prospects of pharmacogenomic studies.

  • Economic Evaluation in Human Genomics (delivered by Brunel University London) will explain the methods, assumptions, decision models, and interpretation of, cost estimate analysis, for health care interventions and health outcomes, with a particular emphasis on genomic medicine

  • Laboratory Skills for Genomics will be a hands-on wet lab course on how to develop a good experimental design, carry out a genomic analysis project, identify and critically analyse sequence variants and determine the implications for patients.   

  • Genome-Based Therapeutics will cover key concepts in developing gene and nucleic acid-based therapies from genomic studies including efficacy and toxicity. 

  • Professional and Research Skills (eLearning module) will teach the differences between audit, research, qualitative, quantitative and systematic review methods, how to conduct literature searches, appraise published data, conduct appropriate statistical tests and understand the data management, ethical and reporting requirements in research studies, with a particular emphasis on the 100,000 Genomes Project and translational research. 

Research projects

(14 weeks full-time / one-year part-time) 

We offer four types of project:

  • laboratory-based
  • clinical-based
  • computer-based
  • literature-based

Assessment is by written dissertation, oral presentation, viva and supervisor mark.  

Research projects may be supervised at Imperial, or co-supervised at Imperial and the Institute of Cancer Research or Brunel University London. 

PG Dip

You can opt to take the seven compulsory modules, plus one optional module, to obtain a Postgraduate Diploma.

COMPULSORY MODULES

  • Core Concepts in Human Genetics and Genomics, providing all of the basic genomic science knowledge required by later modules including genomic architecture, regulatory systems, genetic variation, function and how this impacts upon disease processes and clinical outcomes. This module runs in October at the beginning of the academic year.

  • Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening and Treatment (delivered by the Institute of Cancer Research) will explain the principles of cancer genomics, including predisposition, diagnosis, classification, treatment and patient monitoring with particular emphasis on how genomic analysis impacts these factors and the ethical issues relevant to cancer. 

  • Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease will explain how pathogen genomics can inform the epidemiology of infections, impact upon drug development and resistance, lead to novel diagnostics/therapeutics/stratified healthcare, and provide insights into host susceptibilities to infection.

  • Omics Technologies and their Application to Genomic Medicine, providing an in-depth description of the genomic techniques that are used to assess genomic variation in clinical problems. It will allow you to critically evaluate which techniques might be used and their limitations in analysing different disease states.

  • Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Applied Genomics will explain the principles and subtleties of ethics in evaluating genetic/genomic data with an emphasis on emerging genomics technologies and the ways that ethics issues are handled in various countries.  

  • Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Diseases will explain different types of genetic variation, their contribution to rare and complex disease, how they are detected (with particular emphasis upon the 100,000 Genomes Project), interpreted and communicated. 

  • Either Bioinformatics, Quality Control, Analysis & Interpretation of Genome Sequencing Data, providing the principles of computational DNA sequence analysis, including sequence alignment methods and statistical tests, to identify and correctly communicate pathogenic mutations and assess possible functions through database and network programs) OR the less computationally intense Genomics and the Patient modulewhich will concentrate on the identification and interpretation of final Next Gen DNA sequencing reports with an emphasis on calculating genetic risk and ethical considerations.

OPTIONAL MODULES

  • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Medicine will explain how genomic approaches can be used to understand the mechanisms of differential drug responses and reactions, and to inform patient stratification. An emphasis will be placed upon the current limitations and future prospects of pharmacogenomic studies.

  • Economic Evaluation in Human Genomics (delivered by Brunel University London) will explain the methods, assumptions, decision models, and interpretation of, cost estimate analysis, for health care interventions and health outcomes, with a particular emphasis on genomic medicine

  • Laboratory Skills for Genomics will be a hands-on wet lab course on how to develop a good experimental design, carry out a genomic analysis project, identify and critically analyse sequence variants and determine the implications for patients.   

  • Genome-Based Therapeutics will cover key concepts in developing gene and nucleic acid-based therapies from genomic studies including efficacy and toxicity. 

  • Professional and Research Skills (eLearning module) will teach the differences between audit, research, qualitative, quantitative and systematic review methods, how to conduct literature searches, appraise published data, conduct appropriate statistical tests and understand the data management, ethical and reporting requirements in research studies, with a particular emphasis on the 100,000 Genomes Project and translational research. 

  • Workplace-Based Module (all distance learning) (co-delivered with Buckingham New University) will be conducted with a clinical mentor and a genomics expert. It will focus upon developing a learning contract and a proposed change in clinical practice enabled by genomic medicine approaches and the integration of new knowledge.  It will incorporate an evaluation of personal/organisational issues, the application of genomic methods to a range of cases and an evaluation of their utility. You will complete this module in your own workplace therefore it will only be available to students who work in an appropriate healthcare setting (to be approved by the module co-leads).

PG Cert

You can obtain a Postgraduate Certificate by completing four modules, which must include:

  • Core Concepts in Human Genetics and Genomics
  • At least two further compulsory modules
  • Up to one optional module

So in addition to the module on Core Concepts in Human Genetics and Genomics you might choose three other modules that are compulsory OR two compulsory and one optional module.

COMPULSORY MODULES

  • Core Concepts in Human Genetics and Genomics, providing all of the basic genomic science knowledge required by later modules including genomic architecture, regulatory systems, genetic variation, function and how this impacts upon disease processes and clinical outcomes. This module runs in October at the beginning of the academic year.

  • Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening and Treatment (delivered by the Institute of Cancer Research) will explain the principles of cancer genomics, including predisposition, diagnosis, classification, treatment and patient monitoring with particular emphasis on how genomic analysis impacts these factors and the ethical issues relevant to cancer. 

  • Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease will explain how pathogen genomics can inform the epidemiology of infections, impact upon drug development and resistance, lead to novel diagnostics/therapeutics/stratified healthcare, and provide insights into host susceptibilities to infection.

  • Omics Technologies and their Application to Genomic Medicine, providing an in-depth description of the genomic techniques that are used to assess genomic variation in clinical problems. It will allow you to critically evaluate which techniques might be used and their limitations in analysing different disease states.

  • Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Applied Genomics will explain the principles and subtleties of ethics in evaluating genetic/genomic data with an emphasis on emerging genomics technologies and the ways that ethics issues are handled in various countries.  

  • Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Diseases will explain different types of genetic variation, their contribution to rare and complex disease, how they are detected (with particular emphasis upon the 100,000 Genomes Project), interpreted and communicated. 

  • Either Bioinformatics, Quality Control, Analysis & Interpretation of Genome Sequencing Data, providing the principles of computational DNA sequence analysis, including sequence alignment methods and statistical tests, to identify and correctly communicate pathogenic mutations and assess possible functions through database and network programs) OR the less computationally intense Genomics and the Patient modulewhich will concentrate on the identification and interpretation of final Next Gen DNA sequencing reports with an emphasis on calculating genetic risk and ethical considerations.

 

OPTIONAL MODULES

  • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Medicine will explain how genomic approaches can be used to understand the mechanisms of differential drug responses and reactions, and to inform patient stratification. An emphasis will be placed upon the current limitations and future prospects of pharmacogenomic studies.

  • Economic Evaluation in Human Genomics (delivered by Brunel University London) will explain the methods, assumptions, decision models, and interpretation of, cost estimate analysis, for health care interventions and health outcomes, with a particular emphasis on genomic medicine

  • Laboratory Skills for Genomics will be a hands-on wet lab course on how to develop a good experimental design, carry out a genomic analysis project, identify and critically analyse sequence variants and determine the implications for patients.   

  • Genome-Based Therapeutics will cover key concepts in developing gene and nucleic acid-based therapies from genomic studies including efficacy and toxicity. 

  • Professional and Research Skills (eLearning module) will teach the differences between audit, research, qualitative, quantitative and systematic review methods, how to conduct literature searches, appraise published data, conduct appropriate statistical tests and understand the data management, ethical and reporting requirements in research studies, with a particular emphasis on the 100,000 Genomes Project and translational research. 

  • Workplace-Based Module (all distance learning) (co-delivered with Buckingham New University) will be conducted with a clinical mentor and a genomics expert. It will focus upon developing a learning contract and a proposed change in clinical practice enabled by genomic medicine approaches and the integration of new knowledge.  It will incorporate an evaluation of personal/organisational issues, the application of genomic methods to a range of cases and an evaluation of their utility. You will complete this module in your own workplace therefore it will only be available to students who work in an appropriate healthcare setting (to be approved by the module co-leads).

Short courses

Please find details of how the Genomic Medicine course modules can be taken as a short course on the Genomic Medicine short courses page.