Ancient Light: Melanie King. 10 January – 1 February 2018

 

Ancient Light is an exhibition of photographs by London based artist Melanie King.

Through the production of these artworks, King considers how light from incredibly distant stars can be captured directly onto photosensitive film. These photographs were captured on travels to dark sky areas, including Kielder Observatory in Northumberland, Dartmoor National Park and the Lumen Art Residency.

In this exhibition, Melanie encourages us to view the original negatives and corresponding silver gelatin prints from her “Ancient Light” series. To create these negatives, photons emitted from stars travel over millions of years through the void of space. The photon then travels through Earths’ atmosphere and through the camera lens, at which point the photon is physically absorbed by the silver halide crystals suspended in the film. When processed, the silver halide crystals turn black as they come into contact with developer and fixer. For Melanie, these negatives are as precious as a meteorite or fossil, as their material structure is formed by the passage of incomprehensible periods of time.

 

The solarised silver gelatin Moon image is a result from ongoing collaborative analogue photography experiments with Theo Schlichter, utilising the Fry telescope at the UCLO observatory in Mill Hill, London.

 

“On Dartmoor” comprises of four large scale digital photographs that were created spontaneously in absence of an analogue camera. The images are enlarged, and have been blown up to A0 size in order to provide the viewer with an immersive, dizzying experience when viewed up close.

 

“Ancient Light” was originally inspired by the “Envisioning The Universe” seminar at the National Maritime Museum. At this seminar academic Elizabeth Kessler explained how images from the Hubble Telescope are mediated before being published to the general public. Colours, crops and contrasts are added with sophisticated digital imaging techniques to communicate important features such as chemical composition of a star or structures of gas clouds of nebulae. These images aren’t objective, but neither are they subjective – curiously they sit somewhere in-between. Melanie was unsatisfied by the “constructed” nature of these images, and consequently began her own practice based research journey. In 2015, Melanie created photogravure prints of the Andromeda Galaxy, Moon, Earthrise and comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which were obtained from the NASA and ESA online archives. Using the subjective nature of mediated astronomical photographs as a starting point, Melanie was interested to find out how the materiality of the compressed carbon black ink and fine Hahnemuhle paper affects our reading of an astronomical image.

 

Overall, King’s practice enables her to better understand the phenomena of astronomy in a tangible material way. As part of her participatory practice, King teaches workshops on cyanotype, astrophotography and telescope handling.  King also encourages others to look through telescopes and to visit dark sky spaces with super/collider pop-up astronomy events, inspiration trips to observatories and the Lumen art residency.

 

Astronomy & Language // 15th January, 303A & 303B, Sherfield Building, Imperial College London. 7-9pm.

 

As part of this exhibition, Melanie will be holding an event with theoretical cosmologist Dr Roberto Trotta on astronomy and language.

Melanie will discuss the term “celestograph”, coined by 19th Century playwright August Strindberg after he laid a photosensitive plate under the night sky hoping to catch starlight. Melanie will also speak about the etymology of astronomical terms.

 

Roberto’s research in cosmology is about analysing, interpreting and making sense of cosmological observations, in order to learn more about the properties and nature of dark matter and dark energy. He is also interested in the early Universe and in developing connections between cosmology and particle physics. The goal is to learn more about the history and nature of the Universe, by using cosmology as a Universe-sized laboratory for particle and high energy physics.

 

Roberto is the author of “Edge Of The Sky” which tells the story of the most important discoveries and mysteries in modern cosmology, with a twist. The book's lexicon is limited to the thousand most common words in the English language, excluding physics, energy, galaxy, or even universe. Through the eyes of a fictional scientist (Student-People) hunting for dark matter with one of the biggest telescopes (Big-Seers) on Earth (Home-World), cosmologist Roberto Trotta explores the most important ideas about our universe (All-there-is) in language simple enough for anyone to understand.

 

Melanie King // Biography

 

Born in Manchester, UK in 1988, Melanie King is an artist and curator with a specific focus on astronomy.  She is co-Director of super/collider, Lumen Studios and the London Alternative Photography Collective.  Melanie is currently studying towards a practice based PhD in Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. She is a graduate of the MA in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins and the BA Fine Art at Leeds Art University.

Melanie's inaugural solo exhibition was held at Leeds Art University in 2017. This exhibition "Ancient Light" is Melanie's first London solo exhibition. She has exhibited in group shows at The Photographers' Gallery, Argentea Gallery, Guest Projects, Space Studios and the Sidney Cooper Gallery. Melanie has also exhibited in a wide range of international galleries and has taken part in a number of international residencies to develop aspects of her practice.

Melanie has been involved in a number of large scale commissions. These commissions include a giant eclipse installation at Green Man Festival with Lumen Studios and large scale cyanotypes with the London Alternative Photography Collective. In December 2017, Melanie was commissioned by COS Stores to write a piece "On Bubbles" in association with Design Miami and Studio Swine.

Melanie regularly presents her work at conferences, universities and galleries. Notable venues include The Photographers' Gallery, TATE Exchange, International Space University: Space Studies Programme, University of the Arts Helsinki, London College of Communication, London LASER: Central Saint Martins, London South Bank University, Kosmica: Mexico, Kosmica: Paris, Helsinki Photomedia, Second Home, Soho House, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Uncertain States and Photoforum.

Melanie also organises participatory workshops in relation to her practice. She has developed workshops for the Whitechapel Gallery, The Photographers' Gallery, TATE Exchange, the Institute of Physics, East Street Arts, Kosmica: Mexico, SALT Festival: Norway, London College of Communication Short Courses, Photofusion, Phytology, Hackney Arts, Ditto Press and Brighton Photo Biennal. 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Light: Melanie King. 10 January – 1 February 2018

 

Ancient Light is an exhibition of photographs by London based artist Melanie King.

Through the production of these artworks, King considers how light from incredibly distant stars can be captured directly onto photosensitive film. These photographs were captured on travels to dark sky areas, including Kielder Observatory in Northumberland, Dartmoor National Park and the Lumen Art Residency.

In this exhibition, Melanie encourages us to view the original negatives and corresponding silver gelatin prints from her “Ancient Light” series. To create these negatives, photons emitted from stars travel over millions of years through the void of space. The photon then travels through Earths’ atmosphere and through the camera lens, at which point the photon is physically absorbed by the silver halide crystals suspended in the film. When processed, the silver halide crystals turn black as they come into contact with developer and fixer. For Melanie, these negatives are as precious as a meteorite or fossil, as their material structure is formed by the passage of incomprehensible periods of time.

 

The solarised silver gelatin Moon image is a result from ongoing collaborative analogue photography experiments with Theo Schlichter, utilising the Fry telescope at the UCLO observatory in Mill Hill, London.

 

“On Dartmoor” comprises of four large scale digital photographs that were created spontaneously in absence of an analogue camera. The images are enlarged, and have been blown up to A0 size in order to provide the viewer with an immersive, dizzying experience when viewed up close.

 

“Ancient Light” was originally inspired by the “Envisioning The Universe” seminar at the National Maritime Museum. At this seminar academic Elizabeth Kessler explained how images from the Hubble Telescope are mediated before being published to the general public. Colours, crops and contrasts are added with sophisticated digital imaging techniques to communicate important features such as chemical composition of a star or structures of gas clouds of nebulae. These images aren’t objective, but neither are they subjective – curiously they sit somewhere in-between. Melanie was unsatisfied by the “constructed” nature of these images, and consequently began her own practice based research journey. In 2015, Melanie created photogravure prints of the Andromeda Galaxy, Moon, Earthrise and comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which were obtained from the NASA and ESA online archives. Using the subjective nature of mediated astronomical photographs as a starting point, Melanie was interested to find out how the materiality of the compressed carbon black ink and fine Hahnemuhle paper affects our reading of an astronomical image.

 

Overall, King’s practice enables her to better understand the phenomena of astronomy in a tangible material way. As part of her participatory practice, King teaches workshops on cyanotype, astrophotography and telescope handling.  King also encourages others to look through telescopes and to visit dark sky spaces with super/collider pop-up astronomy events, inspiration trips to observatories and the Lumen art residency.

 

Astronomy & Language // 15th January, 303A & 303B, Sherfield Building, Imperial College London. 7-9pm.

 

As part of this exhibition, Melanie will be holding an event with theoretical cosmologist Dr Roberto Trotta on astronomy and language.

Melanie will discuss the term “celestograph”, coined by 19th Century playwright August Strindberg after he laid a photosensitive plate under the night sky hoping to catch starlight. Melanie will also speak about the etymology of astronomical terms.

 

Roberto’s research in cosmology is about analysing, interpreting and making sense of cosmological observations, in order to learn more about the properties and nature of dark matter and dark energy. He is also interested in the early Universe and in developing connections between cosmology and particle physics. The goal is to learn more about the history and nature of the Universe, by using cosmology as a Universe-sized laboratory for particle and high energy physics.

 

Roberto is the author of “Edge Of The Sky” which tells the story of the most important discoveries and mysteries in modern cosmology, with a twist. The book's lexicon is limited to the thousand most common words in the English language, excluding physics, energy, galaxy, or even universe. Through the eyes of a fictional scientist (Student-People) hunting for dark matter with one of the biggest telescopes (Big-Seers) on Earth (Home-World), cosmologist Roberto Trotta explores the most important ideas about our universe (All-there-is) in language simple enough for anyone to understand.

 

Melanie King // Biography

 

Born in Manchester, UK in 1988, Melanie King is an artist and curator with a specific focus on astronomy.  She is co-Director of super/collider, Lumen Studios and the London Alternative Photography Collective.  Melanie is currently studying towards a practice based PhD in Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. She is a graduate of the MA in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins and the BA Fine Art at Leeds Art University.

Melanie's inaugural solo exhibition was held at Leeds Art University in 2017. This exhibition "Ancient Light" is Melanie's first London solo exhibition. She has exhibited in group shows at The Photographers' Gallery, Argentea Gallery, Guest Projects, Space Studios and the Sidney Cooper Gallery. Melanie has also exhibited in a wide range of international galleries and has taken part in a number of international residencies to develop aspects of her practice.

Melanie has been involved in a number of large scale commissions. These commissions include a giant eclipse installation at Green Man Festival with Lumen Studios and large scale cyanotypes with the London Alternative Photography Collective. In December 2017, Melanie was commissioned by COS Stores to write a piece "On Bubbles" in association with Design Miami and Studio Swine.

Melanie regularly presents her work at conferences, universities and galleries. Notable venues include The Photographers' Gallery, TATE Exchange, International Space University: Space Studies Programme, University of the Arts Helsinki, London College of Communication, London LASER: Central Saint Martins, London South Bank University, Kosmica: Mexico, Kosmica: Paris, Helsinki Photomedia, Second Home, Soho House, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Uncertain States and Photoforum.

Melanie also organises participatory workshops in relation to her practice. She has developed workshops for the Whitechapel Gallery, The Photographers' Gallery, TATE Exchange, the Institute of Physics, East Street Arts, Kosmica: Mexico, SALT Festival: Norway, London College of Communication Short Courses, Photofusion, Phytology, Hackney Arts, Ditto Press and Brighton Photo Biennal. 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Light: Melanie King. 10 January – 1 February 2018

 

Ancient Light is an exhibition of photographs by London based artist Melanie King.

Through the production of these artworks, King considers how light from incredibly distant stars can be captured directly onto photosensitive film. These photographs were captured on travels to dark sky areas, including Kielder Observatory in Northumberland, Dartmoor National Park and the Lumen Art Residency.

In this exhibition, Melanie encourages us to view the original negatives and corresponding silver gelatin prints from her “Ancient Light” series. To create these negatives, photons emitted from stars travel over millions of years through the void of space. The photon then travels through Earths’ atmosphere and through the camera lens, at which point the photon is physically absorbed by the silver halide crystals suspended in the film. When processed, the silver halide crystals turn black as they come into contact with developer and fixer. For Melanie, these negatives are as precious as a meteorite or fossil, as their material structure is formed by the passage of incomprehensible periods of time.

 

The solarised silver gelatin Moon image is a result from ongoing collaborative analogue photography experiments with Theo Schlichter, utilising the Fry telescope at the UCLO observatory in Mill Hill, London.

 

“On Dartmoor” comprises of four large scale digital photographs that were created spontaneously in absence of an analogue camera. The images are enlarged, and have been blown up to A0 size in order to provide the viewer with an immersive, dizzying experience when viewed up close.

 

“Ancient Light” was originally inspired by the “Envisioning The Universe” seminar at the National Maritime Museum. At this seminar academic Elizabeth Kessler explained how images from the Hubble Telescope are mediated before being published to the general public. Colours, crops and contrasts are added with sophisticated digital imaging techniques to communicate important features such as chemical composition of a star or structures of gas clouds of nebulae. These images aren’t objective, but neither are they subjective – curiously they sit somewhere in-between. Melanie was unsatisfied by the “constructed” nature of these images, and consequently began her own practice based research journey. In 2015, Melanie created photogravure prints of the Andromeda Galaxy, Moon, Earthrise and comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which were obtained from the NASA and ESA online archives. Using the subjective nature of mediated astronomical photographs as a starting point, Melanie was interested to find out how the materiality of the compressed carbon black ink and fine Hahnemuhle paper affects our reading of an astronomical image.

 

Overall, King’s practice enables her to better understand the phenomena of astronomy in a tangible material way. As part of her participatory practice, King teaches workshops on cyanotype, astrophotography and telescope handling.  King also encourages others to look through telescopes and to visit dark sky spaces with super/collider pop-up astronomy events, inspiration trips to observatories and the Lumen art residency.

 

Astronomy & Language // 15th January, 303A & 303B, Sherfield Building, Imperial College London. 7-9pm.

 

As part of this exhibition, Melanie will be holding an event with theoretical cosmologist Dr Roberto Trotta on astronomy and language.

Melanie will discuss the term “celestograph”, coined by 19th Century playwright August Strindberg after he laid a photosensitive plate under the night sky hoping to catch starlight. Melanie will also speak about the etymology of astronomical terms.

 

Roberto’s research in cosmology is about analysing, interpreting and making sense of cosmological observations, in order to learn more about the properties and nature of dark matter and dark energy. He is also interested in the early Universe and in developing connections between cosmology and particle physics. The goal is to learn more about the history and nature of the Universe, by using cosmology as a Universe-sized laboratory for particle and high energy physics.

 

Roberto is the author of “Edge Of The Sky” which tells the story of the most important discoveries and mysteries in modern cosmology, with a twist. The book's lexicon is limited to the thousand most common words in the English language, excluding physics, energy, galaxy, or even universe. Through the eyes of a fictional scientist (Student-People) hunting for dark matter with one of the biggest telescopes (Big-Seers) on Earth (Home-World), cosmologist Roberto Trotta explores the most important ideas about our universe (All-there-is) in language simple enough for anyone to understand.

 

Melanie King // Biography

 

Born in Manchester, UK in 1988, Melanie King is an artist and curator with a specific focus on astronomy.  She is co-Director of super/collider, Lumen Studios and the London Alternative Photography Collective.  Melanie is currently studying towards a practice based PhD in Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. She is a graduate of the MA in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins and the BA Fine Art at Leeds Art University.

Melanie's inaugural solo exhibition was held at Leeds Art University in 2017. This exhibition "Ancient Light" is Melanie's first London solo exhibition. She has exhibited in group shows at The Photographers' Gallery, Argentea Gallery, Guest Projects, Space Studios and the Sidney Cooper Gallery. Melanie has also exhibited in a wide range of international galleries and has taken part in a number of international residencies to develop aspects of her practice.

Melanie has been involved in a number of large scale commissions. These commissions include a giant eclipse installation at Green Man Festival with Lumen Studios and large scale cyanotypes with the London Alternative Photography Collective. In December 2017, Melanie was commissioned by COS Stores to write a piece "On Bubbles" in association with Design Miami and Studio Swine.

Melanie regularly presents her work at conferences, universities and galleries. Notable venues include The Photographers' Gallery, TATE Exchange, International Space University: Space Studies Programme, University of the Arts Helsinki, London College of Communication, London LASER: Central Saint Martins, London South Bank University, Kosmica: Mexico, Kosmica: Paris, Helsinki Photomedia, Second Home, Soho House, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Uncertain States and Photoforum.

Melanie also organises participatory workshops in relation to her practice. She has developed workshops for the Whitechapel Gallery, The Photographers' Gallery, TATE Exchange, the Institute of Physics, East Street Arts, Kosmica: Mexico, SALT Festival: Norway, London College of Communication Short Courses, Photofusion, Phytology, Hackney Arts, Ditto Press and Brighton Photo Biennal.