Imperial College London

Podcast: Feast on the Festival and find out why Eurovision makes countries happy

by ,

In this edition: Sampling the delights of the 2018 Imperial Festival and discovering the happiness-boosting powers of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Download the complete podcast (mp3)

The Imperial College Podcast is now also available on the brand new visual podcast app, Entale.

If you have an iPhone, download the app and search for ‘Imperial College Podcast’. You’ll see how our episodes really come alive on the exciting new platform. Download Entale for free on iOS.

Listen to individual chapters:

News: Curing the common cold and life on Mars – We explore a potential new drug that blocks common cold viruses, and discover what Dorset and Mars have in common.

Taste of the Festival – Let our reporters take you on a journey through this year’s science extravaganza, including self-flying drones, schools investigating air pollution and a fairground of science.

Eurovision euphoria – Just getting to the final of the Eurovision Song Contest is linked to increased life satisfaction for a country, whether they win or get nil points. We talk to the researchers behind the study to find out why this might be, and what the implications are for public health.

The podcast is presented by Gareth Mitchell, a lecturer on Imperial's MSc Science Communication course and the presenter of Click Radio on the BBC World Service, with contributions from our roving reporters in the Research Communications group.

Reporters

Hayley Dunning

Hayley Dunning
Communications and Public Affairs

Click to expand or contract

Contact details

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 2412
Email: h.dunning@imperial.ac.uk

Show all stories by this author

Gareth Mitchell

Gareth Mitchell
School of Professional Development

Click to expand or contract

Contact details

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 8766
Email: g.mitchell@imperial.ac.uk

Show all stories by this author

Tags:

Imperial-Festival, Strategy-share-the-wonder, Outreach, Public-health
See more tags

Leave a comment

Your comment may be published, displaying your name as you provide it, unless you request otherwise. Your contact details will never be published.