Imperial College London

Imperial celebrates launch of 2018 Asian Games

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Asian Games hydrogen bus

Imperial College London is celebrating the launch of the 2018 Asian Games by supporting an education roadshow in Indonesia – the host of the games.

Over the next few weeks Imperial will be supporting energy infrastructure provider Ecubes Arcola by helping to facilitate technology workshops for over 1,000 young people in South Sumatra & Java.

During the workshops the schoolchildren will explore renewable energies, hydrogen and fuel cells and the possibilities that they offer for a low-carbon future.

The students will also be challenged to design, build and test a hydrogen powered model car while learning about the environment.

The 2018 Asian Games - which launches this week - is a multi-sport event involving 45 nations and is being held in Jakarta and Palembang, the capital of South Sumatra. In 2016 the government of South Sumatra committed to the development of clean energy infrastructure and zero emission mobility.

Fuel cells research

Dr Colin Hale gave a tour of the Carbon Capture Pilot Plant
Dr Colin Hale gave a tour of the Carbon Capture Pilot Plant

Ahead of the games launch, Imperial hosted a delegation from Indonesia and Malaysia at the College’s South Kensington Campus, including industry leaders and government officials, as well as industry partner Ecubes Arcola, and sponsor of the education programme Serba Dinamik.

The delegation visited the Carbon Capture Pilot Plant and chemical engineering laboratories before taking a ride on London’s first hydrogen fuel cell double-decker bus – which uses technology developed at Imperial.

Imperial's Carbon Capture Pilot Plant processes around 500 tonnes of carbon each year
Dato Karim, Group CEO of Serba Dinamik visits Imperial's Carbon Capture Pilot Plant - which processes around 500 tonnes of carbon each year

Professor Nilay Shah, Head of Department of Chemical Engineering hosted the delegation and explained how Imperial is researching fuel cells.

Professor Shah said: “Imperial is internationally recognised for its research into fuel cells – which have the potential to provide clean and sustainable energy for vehicles and other applications.

“This project has been a great example of working with industry to take research from the laboratory and helping to implement it into the real world to benefit society.

“We are also delighted to be supporting Ecubes Arcola with their energy education programme in schools in South Sumatra and Java."

Professor Nilay Shah, centre, hosted the visit
Professor Nilay Shah, centre, hosted the visit

During the visit, Dr Colin Hale, from the Department of Chemical Engineering, led a demonstration at Imperial’s Carbon Capture Pilot Plant facility.

The facility separates carbon dioxide from nitrogen, but the same process could be used for separating hydrogen, which could potentially be used for fuel cells.

Dr Hale said that facility can help students prepare for working on offshore platforms or refineries.

The students simulated an emergency at the plant – which processes around 500 tonnes of carbon a year.

The delegation also toured laboratories where they saw Imperial’s research into fuel cells.

London’s first hydrogen fuel cell double-decker bus

Imperial academics helped develop the bus's fuel cells
Imperial academics helped develop the bus's fuel cells

Imperial has been collaborating with Ecubes Arcola since 2012 and helped develop the technology used in the hydrogen bus.

Imperial researchers worked on modelling to find out how to run the fuel cells – which power the bus – to optimise their lifetime and efficiency.

The double-decker hydrogen bus is the first to be road tested in London and is completely zero emission.

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Images courtesy of Ecubes Arcola. 

Reporter

Stephen Johns

Stephen Johns
Communications and Public Affairs

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Contact details

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 9531
Email: s.johns@imperial.ac.uk

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