Below is a selection of the studies currently recruiting via this website at the Imperial CRF. Some are looking for healthy volunteers, and others are looking for volunteers with particular health conditions.  You can find out more about these studies and how to apply for them by clicking on the links below.

If you’d like to be the first to know about any of the healthy volunteer studies opening at the ICRF, then we recommend you join our Healthy Volunteer Database.

Currently recruiting studies

AcMyco Study

Short summary:

We are investigating the effect of different types of dietary protein on blood sugar levels and appetite.


Full summary:

The Nutrition Section of the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London, we are investigating the effect of different types of dietary protein on blood sugar levels and appetite.

We are looking for South Asian and European adults with type 2 diabetes who are not taking insulin.

Eligible participants will be asked to attend up to 6 separate day visits for approximately 5 hours at Hammersmith Hospital, during which they will be asked to consume a meal, and have blood samples taken to assess blood sugar and insulin. At the end of the study visit a buffet meal will be served to assess food intake. Participants will be reimbursed.

For more information and to apply, please contact protein@imperial.ac.uk.

iPREVENT Study

Short summary:

The iPREVENT study is looking at whether a new dietary supplement called Inulin Propionate Ester (IPE) can help with prevention of weight gain.


Full summary:

Overweight and obesity affects over 60% of the UK population. In adults, most weight gain occurs when people are in their 20s and 30s and causes many adults to become obese by the time they are middle-aged, leading to increased risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

The amount of fibre (found in edible plant foods such as cereals, fruits, vegetables, nuts, lentils and grains) eaten in the diet has been linked to body weight. People who eat low amounts of dietary fibre are more likely to gain weight.

We know that dietary fibre keeps the bacteria in our gut healthy. These bacteria break down dietary fibre to short-chain fatty acids (smaller pieces of fibre) which can reduce appetite and body fat. ‘Propionate’ it thought to be the best at reducing appetite.

The iPREVENT study is looking at whether a new dietary supplement called Inulin Propionate Ester (IPE) can help with prevention of weight gain.

We are looking for adults aged 20-40 years with a BMI of 25-30 (or 24-27 if you are of South Asian origin), and at least one of the following:

  • Weight gain in the past 12 months
  • Less than 2 portions of fruit/veg per day
  • Regular sugary drinks
  • Little or no exercise

Participants will be asked to take the supplement once a day for 12 months. There will be a screening visit plus 4 study visits across 12 months. This will involve having body and weight measurements taken, and routine blood tests.

Participants will be entitled to £50 per study visit (£200 in total) as well as travel expenses, to compensate for their time and support.

The study is being run by Imperial College London and University of Glasgow. For further information, contact us London – imperial.iprevent@nhs.net or call/text 07951 686783; Glasgow – georgethom1@nhs.net or call/text 07483 805691

Microbiome in Psoriatic ARThritis

Short summary:

The purpose of this study is to: Identify, group and mark the differences in gut microorganisms found in patients with psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, and compared to participants without these conditions.


Full summary:

You are invited to take part in the Mi-PART study.

We are looking for men and women over 18 years old with Psoriatic Arthritis.

The purpose of this study is to: Identify, group and mark the differences in gut microorganisms found in patients with psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, and compared to participants without these conditions.

Travel expenses that you incur through attending the scheduled visits will be reimbursed up to the value of £50 per visit (maximum £200 in total).

Contact sonya.abraham@nhs.net or call 020 3313 8070 to find out more.

MS:TSPO 2 study

Short summary:

An experimental medicine study to validate the 18 kD translocator protein as a novel neuroimmunomodulatory target in multiple sclerosis


Full summary:

What is the purpose of the study?

Etifoxine and XBD173 are drugs which temporarily change the activity of a protein called TSPO in the brain. We would like to know whether these drugs could be a potential treatment for multiple sclerosis.

What does the study involve?

The study involves two visits to the Hammersmith Hospital, seven days apart. The first visit is a full day and the second visit is half a day. On each visit we will take blood. In between the visits, we will ask you to take one of drugs (called etifoxine or XBD173) for a week.

You may then be invited back to the Hammersmith Hospital for a further two visits (visits three and four). These will be the same as visits one and two, except that between visits three and four, we will ask you to take the drug which you did not previously take (etifoxine or XBD173).

You will be reimbursed £300 for participation in the study, as well as for reasonable travel expenses.

Who is eligible?

  • Healthy volunteers
  • Ages 35-65 inclusive.
  • Both males and females

If you are interested, contact us on MStrial@imperial.ac.uk.

NCORE: Neural Correlates of Reward and Emotion in opioid dependence

Short summary:

We are investigating the effects of opioid dependence on brain function, with the aim of improving treatment for detoxification and relapse prevention.


Full summary:

We are investigating the effects of opioid dependence on brain function, with the aim of improving treatment for detoxification and relapse prevention.

Our research uses brain-imaging techniques to detect subtle changes in brain function while performing psychological tasks. These tasks measure brain processes that are important in opioid dependence.

We are currently recruiting participants for the NCORE study. In this study, we will investigate the effects of aprepitant on brain function in opioid-dependent individuals during methadone treatment, and again, after achieving abstinence from methadone. We will compare the results with those from a healthy control group of individuals who do not have opiate dependence.

Aprepitant is a safe, well-tolerated drug that is licensed for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Evidence from previous studies using aprepitant in opiate abuse was supportive of a role for aprepitant to reduce opiate craving and withdrawal.

What’s involved?

Volunteers taking part will be asked to attend 3 or 5 visits in total at the Imperial Clinical Research Facility (ICRF) in the Hammersmith Hospital. Brain scanning (visits 2 to 5) will take place in the Imperial College Clinical Imaging Facility (CIF), which is at the same location. We will arrange taxi transport for all visits.

Opioid-dependent individuals (5 visit days)

Phone screening

  • Visit 1: Consent and screening visit (4-5 hours).
  • Visits 2 and 3: Study days (~7 hours each, 1 week apart) when you are still taking your usual methadone dose.
  • Interim session: To be completed at your usual drug & alcohol service (~2.5 hours).
  • Visits 4 and 5: Study days are identical to visits 2 & 3 (~7 hours each, 1 week apart) but will only be completed once you have stopped taking your methadone.
  • Healthy Controls (3 visit days)

Phone screening

  • Visit 1: Consent and screening visit (4-5 hours).
  • Visits 2 and 3: Study days (~7 hours each, 1 week apart)

Participants will receive £50 for the screening visit and £70 for each subsequent study visit plus travel expenses. Please note that while we will be recruiting health controls, the screening schedule is not certain yet. If you are interested, please contact us and we can add your details to our register of controls.

Am I eligible?

We are looking for male and female volunteers over the age of 21 who:

  • Are available 1 day per week for 3 weeks in the first instance
  • Are not claustrophobic

Specific for opioid-dependent individuals:

  • Are currently dependent on opioids
  • Are currently taking methadone but reducing the dose with a view to becoming abstinent
  • Are not currently dependent on any other drugs*

Specific for healthy controls:

  • Have no history of dependence on drugs or alcohol*
  • Are not taking medicines for a psychiatric condition
  • *Smokers and non-smokers welcome

To check whether you are eligible please contact the team via cfn.recruitment@imperial.ac.uk or 0207 5947028.

Alternatively, contact the study doctor, Dr Katherine Herlinger, on 07745 300 960 during working hours (09:00-17:00) or via katherine.herlinger@nhs.net.

Ethical approval

This study has been approved by the West London & GTAC Research Ethics Committee (19/LO/0971). It has been reviewed and funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC).

Repromet

Short summary:

We are investigating the interaction between reproductive hormones and hormones involved in metabolism


Full summary:

At Imperial College London we are investigating the interaction between reproductive hormones and hormones involved in metabolism. We are looking for women, who do not take any medication and do not smoke, aged 18-60 with a BMI above 25. Eligible participants will be asked to attend up to 4 separate day-long visits at Charing Cross Hospital, during which they’ll receive an intravenous infusion of a natural hormone or salty water and have blood samples taken.

For more information and to apply, please contact imperial.kisspeptin@nhs.net with the reference ‘Repromet’.

The Physiological Effect of Kisspeptin on Reproductive Hormones

Short summary:

We are currently looking for women aged 18-30 years who are not on any hormonal treatment to investigate the effect of kisspeptin on reproductive hormones.


Full summary:

We, at Imperial College London are trying to learn more about a naturally occurring fertility hormone called kisspeptin and its importance in the control of reproductive hormones.
We are looking to invite healthy women aged 18-35 yrs old without any significant medical problems who are not taking any hormonal contraceptive medications to take part in the research.
The study has been fully approved by the research ethics committee.

Following a screening visit where we will check you are fit and healthy to take part in the research and explain about the study in more detail, we will then organise your research study visits.
Expenses will be provided in relation to time spent during research study visits (usually ~£125 for an 8 hour visit).

REC Ref: REC 12/LO/0507

For further information, please contact us at kisspeptin@imperial.ac.uk

Upper GI Appetite Study

Short summary

We are investigating how healthy weight and obese people digest and absorb meals rich in different nutrients, and how this affects their fullness


Full summary

Overweight and obesity affects over 60% of the UK population. It is caused by chronic surplus of energy intake relative to energy output. Appetite is regulated by a complex combination of external and internal factors, and there is evidence that this is dysregulated in obese people.

Meals containing the same energy, but rich in sugar, protein or fats, also have different effects on fullness. Obese people sense nutrients differently to those of a healthy weight, meaning they do not feel as full after a meal. However, the reasons for this are unknown.

We are investigating how healthy weight and obese people digest and absorb meals rich in different nutrients, and how this affects their fullness. We require participants who:

  • Are between 18 and 60 years old
  • Are healthy
  • Have a BMI of 18.5-24.9kg/m2 or 30-39.9kg/m2

Participants will attend the Clinical Research Facility on one day for a screening visit, followed by a separate four-day stay during which time the study will take place.

During the study, participants will have nasal tubes inserted that will lie in the stomach and the first part of the small intestine. They will drink a milkshake high in either sugar, protein or fat. Gut contents will be collected from these tubes to monitor digestion and absorption of the meal. Blood samples will also be taken, and participants will also complete questionnaires assessing their feelings of fullness. This will help us understand how nutrients are sensed in the gut and the bloodstream to regulate food intake and provide insight into how to design diets to combat obesity.

As compensation for their time and inconvenience, participants will receive £10 for the screening visit and £400 for the main visit, plus travel expenses.

For further information, please contact us:

Email: metab.macro@imperial.ac.uk
Telephone: 07494699830

This study has been approved by the South West – Frenchay Research Ethics Committee, reference 19/SW/0023.