Criteria

  • The person has a condition likely to benefit from a short course of physiotherapy
  • The condition is causing sickness absence or significantly interfering with work
  • The person is unable to obtain physiotherapy treatment via their GP or private insurance within 3 weeks

The College Occupational Health Service can refer staff who have sustained an acute musculoskeletal injury which is impacting their ability to undertake their role for a short course of Physiotherapy. (Sports injuries are not included).

If the person is currently receiving treatment from their own doctor, we may first have to obtain their agreement before a referral can be organised. 

Suitable types of problems

  • Acute joint or limb injuries e.g. sprained knee, sprained ankle, torn cartilage, torn ligaments, muscle strain
  • Acute back strains, slipped disc, sciatica
  • Neck injuries
  • Tendonitis of wrist

Staff with long-standing back problems will not be considered for referral, as a short course of physiotherapy is unlikely to be of benefit.

The physiotherapist is unable to take on for treatment anyone who is currently under treatment with other forms of physical therapy e.g. chiropractic, osteopathy or who is currently receiving physiotherapy elsewhere.

The member of staff will usually have to attend the College Occupational Health Service at South Kensington for assessment before being referred for treatment. Once referred, appointments will usually be offered within 2 weeks.

If you think you meet the criteria and wish to be referred, please contact occupational health to book a self-referral appointment. Staff should understand that they are not guaranteed treatment: the final decision will rest with the occupational health professional. Where referral is deemed unsuitable, advice will also be offered on other measures that could benefit recovery or assist with rehabilitation back into work.

Please note if the demand for treatment is such that the allocated funds are used up, the service will be suspended until more funding becomes available. The Occupational Health Service is unable to cover incidental costs such as travelling expenses.