Imperial College London

Professor Aldo R. Boccaccini

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Materials

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6731a.boccaccini

 
 
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Location

 

210Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

1189 results found

Ponsot I, Bernardo E, Bontempi E, Depero L, Detsch R, Chinnam RK, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Recycling of pre-stabilized municipal waste incinerator fly ash and soda-lime glass into sintered glass-ceramics, JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION, Vol: 89, Pages: 224-230, ISSN: 0959-6526

Journal article

Macon ALB, Kim TB, Valliant EM, Goetschius K, Brow RK, Day DE, Hoppe A, Boccaccini AR, Kim IY, Ohtsuki C, Kokubo T, Osaka A, Vallet-Regi M, Arcos D, Fraile L, Salinas AJ, Teixeira AV, Vueva Y, Almeida RM, Miola M, Vitale-Brovarone C, Verne E, Hoeland W, Jones JRet al., 2015, A unified in vitro evaluation for apatite-forming ability of bioactive glasses and their variants, Journal of Materials Science-Materials in Medicine, Vol: 26, ISSN: 1573-4838

The aim of this study was to propose andvalidate a new unified method for testing dissolution ratesof bioactive glasses and their variants, and the formation ofcalcium phosphate layer formation on their surface, whichis an indicator of bioactivity. At present, comparison in theliterature is difficult as many groups use different testingprotocols. An ISO standard covers the use of simulatedbody fluid on standard shape materials but it does not takeinto account that bioactive glasses can have very differentspecific surface areas, as for glass powders. Validation ofthe proposed modified test was through round robin testingand comparison to the ISO standard where appropriate. Theproposed test uses fixed mass per solution volume ratio andagitated solution. The round robin study showed differencesin hydroxyapatite nucleation on glasses of differentcomposition and between glasses of the same compositionbut different particle size. The results were reproduciblebetween research facilities. Researchers should use thismethod when testing new glasses, or their variants, to enablecomparison between the literature in the future.

Journal article

Doergens A, Roether JA, Dippold D, Boccaccini AR, Schubert DWet al., 2015, Identifying key processing parameters for the electrospinning of aligned polymer nanofibers, MATERIALS LETTERS, Vol: 140, Pages: 99-102, ISSN: 0167-577X

Journal article

Tallawi M, Rai R, Boccaccini AR, Aifantis KEet al., 2015, Effect of Substrate Mechanics on Cardiomyocyte Maturation and Growth, TISSUE ENGINEERING PART B-REVIEWS, Vol: 21, Pages: 157-165, ISSN: 1937-3368

Journal article

Rivadeneira J, Laura Di Virgilio A, Carina Audisio M, Boccaccini AR, Gorustovich AAet al., 2015, Evaluation of the antibacterial effects of vancomycin hydrochloride released from agar-gelatin-bioactive glass composites, BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1748-6041

Journal article

Miguez-Pacheco V, Hench LL, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Bioactive glasses beyond bone and teeth: Emerging applications in contact with soft tissues, ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 1742-7061

Journal article

Sarker B, Hum J, Nazhat SN, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Combining Collagen and Bioactive Glasses for Bone Tissue Engineering: A Review, ADVANCED HEALTHCARE MATERIALS, Vol: 4, Pages: 176-194, ISSN: 2192-2640

Journal article

Julich-Gruner KK, Lendlein A, Boccaccini AR, Neffe ATet al., 2015, Anisotropic Composites of Desaminotyrosine and Desaminotyrosyl Tyrosine Functionalized Gelatin and Bioactive Glass Microparticles, Symposium on Multifunctional Polymeric and Hybrid Materials / MRS Fall Meeting, Publisher: MATERIALS RESEARCH SOC, Pages: 9-14, ISSN: 0272-9172

Conference paper

Gmeiner R, Mitteramskogler G, Stampfl J, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Stereolithographic Ceramic Manufacturing of High Strength Bioactive Glass, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF APPLIED CERAMIC TECHNOLOGY, Vol: 12, Pages: 38-45, ISSN: 1546-542X

Journal article

Philippart A, Boccaccini AR, Fleck C, Schubert DW, Roether JAet al., 2015, Toughening and functionalization of bioactive ceramic and glass bone scaffolds by biopolymer coatings and infiltration: a review of the last 5 years, EXPERT REVIEW OF MEDICAL DEVICES, Vol: 12, Pages: 93-111, ISSN: 1743-4440

Journal article

Dickerson JH, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Introduction to Focus Issue on Electrophoretic Deposition, JOURNAL OF THE ELECTROCHEMICAL SOCIETY, Vol: 162, Pages: Y9-Y9, ISSN: 0013-4651

Journal article

Cabanas-Polo S, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Understanding Bioactive Glass Powder Suspensions for Electrophoretic Deposition of Bioactive Glass-Polymer Coatings, JOURNAL OF THE ELECTROCHEMICAL SOCIETY, Vol: 162, Pages: D3077-D3083, ISSN: 0013-4651

Journal article

Moskalewicz T, Kot M, Seuss S, Kedzierska A, Czyrska-Filemonowicz A, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Electrophoretic Deposition and Characterization of HA/Chitosan Nanocomposite Coatings on Ti6Al7Nb Alloy, METALS AND MATERIALS INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 21, Pages: 96-103, ISSN: 1598-9623

Journal article

Novajra G, Perdika P, Pisano R, Baino F, Jones JR, Boccaccini AR, Detsch R, Vitale-Brovarone Cet al., 2015, Tailoring of bone scaffold properties using silicate/phosphate glass mixtures, Pages: 283-288, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. Different ratios of a resorbable phosphate glass (ICEL) and a bioactive silicate glass (CEL2) were co-sintered to obtain 3D porous scaffolds by gel-cast foaming method. The scaffold morphology, crystalline phases and compressive strength were studied. All the scaffolds showed a 3D structure with highly interconnected pores. The ICEL/CEL2 co-sintering resulted in a lower shrinkage leading to higher scaffold porosity (more than 70 vol%) compared to pure ICEL and CEL2 (about 65 vol%). Tuning ICEL/CEL2 ratio allowed the modulation of the scaffold resorption rate, with weight loss ranging from 20% to 75% after soaking for 3 months in simulated body fluid. Scaffolds containing higher amount of CEL2 silicate glass, resulted in a very high bioactivity. In vitro biological test showed no toxic effect of the scaffolds on human osteoblast-like cells.

Conference paper

Haro Durand LA, Vargas GE, Romero NM, Vera-Mesones R, Porto-Lopez JM, Boccaccini AR, Zago MP, Baldi A, Gorustovich Aet al., 2015, Angiogenic effects of ionic dissolution products released from a boron-doped 45S5 bioactive glass, JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY B, Vol: 3, Pages: 1142-1148, ISSN: 2050-750X

Journal article

Naseri S, Hum J, Lepry WC, Miri AK, Nazhat SN, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Fabrication and characterization of zein-bioactive glass scaffolds, BIOINSPIRED BIOMIMETIC AND NANOBIOMATERIALS, Vol: 4, Pages: 73-78, ISSN: 2045-9858

Journal article

Francis A, Virtanen S, Turhan MC, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Investigating the effect of salicylate salt in enhancing the corrosion resistance of AZ91 magnesium alloy for biomedical applications, BioNanoMaterials, Vol: 2015, ISSN: 2193-0651

The pretreatment process plays a vital role in the development of a robust protective layer on magnesium alloys. This work presents a novel insight into the pretreatment of magnesium alloy AZ91 in alkaline silicate solution by anodic oxidation in the presence of C7H5NaO3 (sodium salicylate) to enhance surface resistance and introduce a passive biolayer. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of protective layers prepared at different voltages was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in SBF solution. The Nyquist impedance plots for anodized films, which consist of a mixture of magnesium silicate and salicylate, indicate a significant corrosion protection ability of the layers formed under optimized conditions; an increase of the real impedance from the value of ∼2 kΩ.cm2 for the bare alloy surface to about 10-12 kΩ.cm2 for the anodized film can be observed. The results indicate that surface modification by anodizing in silicate electrolyte in the presence of sodium salicylate is an alternative pretreatment to improve the corrosion resistance of AZ91.

Journal article

Zheng K, Solodovnyk A, Li W, Goudouri O-M, Staehli C, Nazhat SN, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Aging Time and Temperature Effects on the Structure and Bioactivity of Gel-Derived 45S5 Glass-Ceramics, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY, Vol: 98, Pages: 30-38, ISSN: 0002-7820

Journal article

Romeis S, Hoppe A, Detsch R, Boccaccini AR, Schmidt J, Peukert Wet al., 2015, Top-down processing of submicron 45S5 Bioglass (R) for enhanced in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility, 7th World Congress on Particle Technology (WCPT), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, Pages: 534-541, ISSN: 1877-7058

Conference paper

Cordero-Arias L, Cabanas-Polo S, Virtanen S, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Electrophoretic deposition of nanostructured titania-bioactive glass/alginate coatings on stainless steel, Pages: 159-164, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. An alginate (Alg) based coating containing nanoparticles of titania (nTiO2) and bioactive glass 45S5 (nBG) was deposited on stainless steel substrates by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The composite nTiO2-nBG/Alg coating developed for potential biomedical applications, was produced from a stable ethanol/water suspension (ζ-potential of -53±13mV) using 7V of deposition potential and 1min of deposition time as optimal conditions. Morphology and composition of the coatings were studied by FTIR, EDX, SEM and XRD, showing that all components were successfully deposited on the final coating. According to TG analysis the coatings presents a 62.4wt% of ceramic phase and 37.6wt% polymer. The coating shows corrosion protection properties compared with the bare uncoated material when analyzed via polarization curves in Dulbecco's MEM.

Conference paper

Miola M, Vernè E, Piredda A, Seuss S, Cabanas-Polo S, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Development and characterization of PEEK/B2O3-doped 45S5 bioactive glass composite coatings obtained by electrophoretic deposition, Pages: 165-169, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. Three different glasses were synthesized by doping 45S5 bioactive glass with B2O3. The bioactivity of the glasses was evaluated by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) up to 3 days; all glasses showed the precipitation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) after one day of soaking in SBF. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) was used to prepare PEEK/B2O3-doped 45S5 glass composite coatings on stainless steel substrates. The coatings were characterized by means of tape test (ASTM D3359-B), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurements, thermogravimetric analysis and in vitro bioactivity test. All composite coatings exhibited a porous and homogenous structure with a hydrophobic surface, according to the wettability test. The in vitro test in SBF demonstrated that the coatings were highly bioactive.

Conference paper

Chen Q, Cabanas-Polo S, Ding Y, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Bioactive glass-biopolymer multilayer coatings fabricated by electrophoretic deposition combined with layer-by-layer assembly, Pages: 170-175, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) based multilayer coatings on stainless steel were produced by a combination of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. The properties of the multilayer coating were tested with different characterization methods including SEM, FTIR, XRD, laser profilometer and water contact angle measurements. Degradation and in-vitro bioactivity behaviors were tested in simulated body fluid (SBF) over different time periods. The decomposition of the coating was inhibited and the hydroxyapatite (HA) formation after short immersion period (0.5d) was confirmed. At the same time, levofloxacin, used as a model antibiotic, was incorporated into the multilayer structure for antibacterial purpose.

Conference paper

Cabanas-Polo S, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Understanding the colloidal behaviour or 45S5 bioactive glass particles to obtain bioactive-glass based composite coatings by EPD, Pages: 15-19, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. The interaction between bioactive glass particles and polymers with different functional groups has been established in this work to better understand and control the colloidal processing of the bioactive glass phase. Cationic polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), anionic polyacrylic acid (PAA) and neutral polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were selected and the surface reactions in alcoholic media and between bioactive glass particles and polymers were considered. All three polymers were successfully employed to obtain soft composite coatings incorporating bioactive glass particles.

Conference paper

Borjas S, Gil EJ, Cordero L, Pavón JJ, Rodriguez-Ortiz JA, Boccaccini AR, Torres Yet al., 2015, Electrophoretic deposition and characterization of chitosan/45S5 bioactive glass composite coatings on porous titanium for biomedical applications, Pages: 189-194, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. Porous titanium samples of cp Ti grade IV were obtained by space-holder technique (50% vol. of NH4HCO3, 800 MPa, 1250 °C during 2 h in high vacuum), producing a good balance between stiffness and mechanical strength. The samples were coated with chitosan/45S5 bioactive glass composite by electrophoretic deposition. Homogeneity, infiltration efficiency, and coatings integrity (cracking and adhesion) were evaluated in order to establish correlations with processing parameters. SEM, FTIR, and contact profilometry were performed for detailed characterization of the coatings; and micro-mechanical properties (P-h curves and scratch testing) were set-up as well. Optimum EPD parameters were 25 V, 7 min and suspension containing 0.5 g/L chitosan and 1.5 g/L BG a titanium structure with pore sizes greater than 200 μm are required.

Conference paper

Metze AL, Pishbin F, Ryan MP, Seuss S, Diba M, Shaffer MSP, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Electrophoretic co-deposition of chitosan and graphene oxide results in antibacterial coatings for medical applications, Pages: 176-182, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. Chitosan - graphene oxide (GO) composite coatings intended for antibacterial applications were obtained by cathodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on stainless steel. The coatings were characterized using SEM, FTIR, contact angle and roughness measurements and by antibacterial studies against E.coli. The coating was observed to consist of a polymer matrix with embedded, agglomerated graphene oxide sheets. A decrease in bacteria cell viability of at least 50 % was measured on the chitosan - GO surface in comparison to uncoated stainless steel.

Conference paper

Negishi H, Reuß S, Schwieger W, Boccaccini ARet al., 2015, Preparation of ZSM-5 zeolite membranes by combined hydrothermal synthesis and electrophoretic deposition, Pages: 47-52, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. The preparation of a ZSM-5 zeolite membrane on porous stainless steel disk by hydrothermal synthesis with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) as a seeding method was investigated. Micron size ZSM-5 crystal powder was seeded by EPD on the support disk by using ZSM-5 powder dispersed in ethanol. The seeded amounts were easily controlled by the deposition time during EPD. The membrane after secondary growth had a low amount of zeolite in comparison with the in situ seeding method and the permeance of single gas such as He, N2 and CO2 was also low in comparison with that of the in situ seeding method.

Conference paper

Raddaha NSJ, Seuss S, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Study of the electrophoretic deposition of chitosan/halloysite nanotubes/titanium dioxide composite coatings using taguchi experimental design approach, Pages: 230-239, ISSN: 1013-9826

© (2015) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland. This study presents experimental results on the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of chitosan/halloysite nanotube/titanium dioxide composite coatings based on the Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) approach. Taguchi array of L18 type with mixed levels of the control factor was used to study the influence of EPD parameters, including halloysite nanotubes concentration, electric voltage and deposition time, on deposition yield. For identifying the significant factors that affected the deposition yield, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and regression analysis based on partial least-square method were used. The coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. It was found that the deposition time has significantly influenced the deposition rate but the halloysite nanotube concentration and the applied voltage have the smallest effect on the deposition. The optimum condition for high yield of deposition with low standard deviation is achieved when the concentration of halloysite nanotubes is 0.3g/L and the applied voltage is 40volt with 300sec. as a deposition time. The predicted EPD conditions were verified by experiments and qualitative agreement was obtained.

Conference paper

Arkudas A, Beier JP, Boccaccini AR, Horch REet al., 2015, Characterisation of vascularisation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, MATERIALS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 180-187, ISSN: 0267-0836

Journal article

Nooeaid P, Schulze-Tanzil G, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Stratified Scaffolds for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering., Methods Mol Biol, Vol: 1340, Pages: 191-200

Stratified scaffolds are promising devices finding application in the field of osteochondral tissue engineering. In this scaffold type, different biomaterials are chosen to fulfill specific features required to mimic the complex osteochondral tissue interface, including cartilage, interlayer tissue, and subchondral bone. Here, the biomaterials and fabrication methods currently used to manufacture stratified multilayered scaffolds as well as cell seeding techniques for their characterization are presented.

Journal article

Hoppe A, Boccaccini AR, 2015, Biological Impact of Bioactive Glasses and Their Dissolution Products., Front Oral Biol, Vol: 17, Pages: 22-32, ISSN: 1420-2433

For many years, bioactive glasses (BGs) have been widely considered for bone tissue engineering applications due to their ability to bond to hard as well as soft tissue (a property termed bioactivity) and for their stimulating effects on bone formation. Ionic dissolution products released during the degradation of the BG matrix induce osteogenic gene expression leading to enhanced bone regeneration. Recently, adding bioactive metallic ions (e.g. boron, copper, cobalt, silver, zinc and strontium) to silicate (or phosphate and borate) glasses has emerged as a promising route for developing novel BG formulations with specific therapeutic functionalities, including antibacterial, angiogenic and osteogenic properties. The degradation behaviour of BGs can be tailored by adjusting the glass chemistry making these glass matrices potential carrier systems for controlled therapeutic ion release. This book chapter summarises the fundamental aspects of the effect of ionic dissolution products from BGs on osteogenesis and angiogenesis, whilst discussing novel BG compositions with controlled therapeutic ion release.

Journal article

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