Imperial College London

Professor Aldo R. Boccaccini

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Materials

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6731a.boccaccini

 
 
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Location

 

210Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Composite Systems (Metal, Ceramic, Polymer) - AEM-CM08

Aims

Ceramic:

• To introduce the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)
• To present the different polycrystalline ceramic and silicate glass matrix available for CMCs
• To consider relevant process technologies for reliable production of CMCs
• To enhance understanding of the structure and mechanical properties of CMCs by considering particle and fibre reinforced composites, toughening mechanisms, failure behaviour and high-temperature behaviour, including thermal shock.
• To illustrate application of ceramic matrix composite materials with selected examples of commercially available composites.
• To address limitations of available CMCs.

Metal:


• To introduce the variety and typical applications of metal matrix composites (MMCs)
• To deliver an overview of MMC technologies; benefits and limitations,
• To consider processing methods for different MMCs and factors affecting their manufacture.
• To review typical behaviours and failure modes of the main MMC classes.

Polymer:

•    To introduce polymer-basics: chemistry, physics, classification, structure, molecular weight (distribution).
•    To present the difference between: a) chain growth & step growth polymerisation, b) amorphous & semi-crystalline polymers, c) thermoplasts & cross-linked polymers.
•    To present polymer properties: thermal (melting temperature, glass transition temperature), crystallinity: dependency on structure.
•    To illustrate mechanical properties: stress-strain behaviour, Young`s modulus.
•    To introduce viscoelasticity: models, time-temperature-superposition.
•    To address an example of polymer-matrix-composite.

Role

Lecturer

Fibres - AEM-CM05

Aims

  • To introduce the classification of fibres used as reinforcement in composites: natural an artificial fibres, metallic, polymeric, carbon, glass and ceramic fibres.
  • To explain the distribution of strengths of fibres and introduce the concept of fibre bundle.
  • To introduce the concept of fibre flexibility.
  • To present the processing, structure and properties of commonly available fibres.
  • To consider the production of selected particulate and whisker reinforcements and the relative merits of different forms of reinforcement.
  • To present the importance of control of the matrix-reinforcement interface.

Role

Lecturer