Imperial College London

Professor the Lord Darzi of Denham PC KBE FRS FMedSci HonFREng

Faculty of MedicineInstitute of Global Health Innovation

Co-Director of the Institute of Global Health Innovation
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 1310a.darzi

 
 
//

Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

1875 results found

Story GW, Kurth-Nelson Z, Crockett M, Vlaev I, Darzi A, Dolan RJet al., 2020, Social discounting of pain, JOURNAL OF THE EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR, ISSN: 0022-5002

Journal article

Huf S, Kerrison RS, King D, Chadborn T, Richmond A, Cunningham D, Friedman E, Shukla H, Tseng F-M, Judah G, Darzi A, Vlaev Iet al., 2020, Behavioral economics informed message content in text message reminders to improve cervical screening participation: Two pragmatic randomized controlled trials, Preventive Medicine, Vol: 139, ISSN: 0091-7435

The objective of the reported research was to assess the impact of text message (SMS) reminders and their content on cervical screening rates. Women invited for cervical screening in Northwest London from February-October 2015 were eligible. 3133 women aged 24-29 (Study 1) were randomized (1, 1) to 'no SMS' (control), or a primary care physician (PCP) endorsed SMS (SMS-PCP). 11,405 women aged 30-64 (Study 2), were randomized (1, 1:1:1:1:1:1) to either: no SMS, an SMS without manipulation (SMS), the SMS-PCP, an SMS with a total or proportionate social norm (SMS-SNT or SMS-SNP), or an SMS with a gain-framed or loss-framed message (SMS-GF and SMS-LF). The primary outcome was participation at 18 weeks. In Study 1 participation was significantly higher in the SMS-PCP arm (31.4%) compared to control (26.4%, aOR, 1.29, 95%CI: 1.09-1·51; p = 0.002). In Study 2 participation was highest in the SMS-PCP (38.4%) and SMS (38.1%) arms compared to control (34.4%), (aOR: 1.19, 95%CI: 1.03-1.38; p = 0.02 and aOR: 1.18, 95%CI: 1.02-1.37; p = 0.03, respectively). The results demonstrate that behavioral SMSs improve cervical screening participation. The message content plays an important role in the impact of SMS. The results from this trial have already been used to designing effective policy for cervical cancer screening. The NHS Cervical Screening Programme started running a London-wide screening SMS campaign which was based on the cervical screening trial described here. According to figures published by Public Health England, after six months attendance increased by 4.8%, which is the equivalent of 13,400 more women being screened at 18 weeks.

Journal article

Modi H, Singh H, Darzi A, Leff Det al., 2020, Multitasking and time pressure in the operating room: impact on surgeons’ brain function, Annals of Surgery, Vol: 272, Pages: 648-657, ISSN: 0003-4932

Objective:To assess the impact of multitasking and time pressure on surgeons’ brain function during laparoscopic suturing.Summary Background Data:Recent neuroimaging evidencesuggests that deterioration in surgical performance under time pressure is associated with deactivationof the prefrontal cortex (PFC),an area important for executive functions. However, the effect ofmultitasking on operator brain functionremains unknown.Methods:29surgical residentsperformed anintracorporealsuturing task under fourconditions: 1) self-pacedsuturing,2) time-pressured suturing, 3) self-paced suturingplus decision-making, and 4) time-pressured suturing plus decision-making. Subjectiveworkload was quantified using the Surgical Task Load Index. Technical skill was objectively assessed using task progression scores, error scores, leak volumes, and knot tensile strengths. PFC activation was measuredusing optical neuroimaging. Results:Compared with self-paced suturing, subjective workload(au)was significantly greater in time-pressuredsuturing (146.0 vs. 196.0), suturing with decision-making (146.0 vs.182.0), and time-pressuredsuturing with decision-making (146.0 vs.227.0). Technical performance duringcombined suturing and decision-making taskswas inferiortosuturing alone undertime pressure orself-paced conditions(p<0.001).Significant dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC) activations were observed during self-paced suturing, and ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC) deactivations were identified during time-pressuredsuturing. However, suturing in conjunction withdecision-making resulted in 2significantdeactivation across boththe VLPFC and DLPFC (p<0.05). Random effects regression analysis confirmed decision-making predicts VLPFC and DLPFC deactivation (z=-2.62, p<0.05).Conclusions:Performance degradation during high workload conditions is associated with deactivation of prefrontal regions important fo

Journal article

Cruz Rivera S, Liu X, Chan AW, Denniston AK, Calvert MJ, Ashrafian H, Beam AL, Collins GS, Darzi A, Deeks JJ, ElZarrad MK, Espinoza C, Esteva A, Faes L, Ferrante di Ruffano L, Fletcher J, Golub R, Harvey H, Haug C, Holmes C, Jonas A, Keane PA, Kelly CJ, Lee AY, Lee CS, Manna E, Matcham J, McCradden M, Moher D, Monteiro J, Mulrow C, Oakden-Rayner L, Paltoo D, Panico MB, Price G, Rowley S, Savage R, Sarkar R, Vollmer SJ, Yau Cet al., 2020, Guidelines for clinical trial protocols for interventions involving artificial intelligence: the SPIRIT-AI extension, The Lancet Digital Health, Vol: 2, Pages: e549-e560

© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license The SPIRIT 2013 statement aims to improve the completeness of clinical trial protocol reporting by providing evidence-based recommendations for the minimum set of items to be addressed. This guidance has been instrumental in promoting transparent evaluation of new interventions. More recently, there has been a growing recognition that interventions involving artificial intelligence (AI) need to undergo rigorous, prospective evaluation to demonstrate their impact on health outcomes. The SPIRIT-AI (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials-Artificial Intelligence) extension is a new reporting guideline for clinical trial protocols evaluating interventions with an AI component. It was developed in parallel with its companion statement for trial reports: CONSORT-AI (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials-Artificial Intelligence). Both guidelines were developed through a staged consensus process involving literature review and expert consultation to generate 26 candidate items, which were consulted upon by an international multi-stakeholder group in a two-stage Delphi survey (103 stakeholders), agreed upon in a consensus meeting (31 stakeholders) and refined through a checklist pilot (34 participants). The SPIRIT-AI extension includes 15 new items that were considered sufficiently important for clinical trial protocols of AI interventions. These new items should be routinely reported in addition to the core SPIRIT 2013 items. SPIRIT-AI recommends that investigators provide clear descriptions of the AI intervention, including instructions and skills required for use, the setting in which the AI intervention will be integrated, considerations for the handling of input and output data, the human–AI interaction and analysis of error cases. SPIRIT-AI will help promote transparency and completeness for clinical trial protocol

Journal article

Evans-Harvey K, Erridge S, Karamchandani U, Abdalla S, Beatty JW, Darzi A, Purkayastha S, Sodergren MHet al., 2020, Comparison of surgeon gaze behaviour against objective skill assessment in laparoscopic cholecystectomy-a prospective cohort study., Int J Surg, Vol: 82, Pages: 149-155

BACKGROUND: Eye tracking technology may provide the basis of a novel, objective technical skill assessment in surgery. Past research has showed differences in the gaze patterns between expert and novice surgeons. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gaze behaviors and technical skill during laparoscopic cholecystectomy as determined by objective assessment scores. METHODS: Gaze behaviors of surgeons performing laparoscopic cholecystectomies were mapped using wearable eye tracking apparatus. Two impartial surgeons retrospectively analyzed video footage of the procedure to perform Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) assessments. Primary endpoints were correlation between gaze behaviours (dwell time (%) and fixation frequency (count/s)) and OSATS scores. Dwell time was defined as the percentage of time spent fixating on particular visual areas of interest (AOI). Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to estimate the relationship between primary endpoints and AOIs. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS: 13 procedures were analyzed. Throughout all operative segments, a negative correlation was present between operating theatre dwell time and OSATS scores (p < 0.05). During dissection of Calot's triangle, there was a strong positive correlation between laparoscopic screen dwell time and OSATS scoring [r = 0.655, p < 0.05]. Scrub nurse dwell time during dissection of Calot's triangle showed a strong negative correlation with OSATS scoring [r = -0.619, p < 0.05]. During dissection of gallbladder fossa, operating theatre fixation frequency negatively correlated against OSATS scores [r = -0.566, p < 0.05]. CONCLUSION: The results suggest a greater focus on significant visual stimuli alongside a lack of attention to non-essential stimuli during critical stages of the operative period is associated with greater te

Journal article

Maurice J, Lett A, Skinner C, Lim A, Richardson M, Painadath Thomas A, Summers P, Vyas K, Tadbier A, Vilar R, Kuimova M, Miodragovic S, Vergis N, Kelly P, Cordeiro M, Hoare J, Darzi A, Goldin R, Thursz M, Thompson Aet al., 2020, Transcutaneous fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for non-invasive monitoring of gut function – first clinical experiences, Scientific Reports, ISSN: 2045-2322

Journal article

Harlow C, Sivananthan A, Ayaru L, Patel K, Darzi A, Patel Net al., 2020, Endoscopic submucosal dissection: an update on tools and accessories, Therapeutic Advances in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 2631-7745

Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a minimally invasive therapeutic procedure to remove larger polyps or early non-metastatic lesions. It has long been used in Asia, but is now fast growing in popularity in the West.There are multiple challenges faced by ESD practitioners. While the practice of ESD in gastric lesions is relatively well established, the oesophagus with its narrow lumen and challenging workspace, and the colon with its tortuous course and folds are more challenging frontiers. The nature of performing a procedure endoscopically means that conventional methods offer no mechanism for providing counter-traction while performing dissection, impeding visibility and increasing the rate of complications.There are a multitude of tools available to those performing ESD for the different stages of the procedure. This article reviews the accessories currently used in regular ESD practice including the knives used to cut and dissect lesions, the cap and hood devices used to improve visibility and safety, injection fluids to lift the submucosal plane, haemostatic devices, generators, and finally, emerging traction apparatus. There is some evidence behind the use of these tools, however, ESD remains the domain of a small number of practitioners and the practice relies heavily on expert experience. Evolution of the ESD toolbox will make the procedure more accessible to more endoscopists, which in turn will drive the development of a more substantial evidence base to evaluate efficacy and safety of the multitude of tools.

Journal article

Sharma C, Singh H, Orihuela-Espina F, Darzi A, Sodergren MHet al., 2020, Visual gaze patterns reveal surgeons' ability to identify risk of bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy., HPB (Oxford)

BACKGROUND: Bile duct injury is a serious surgical complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The aim of this study was to identify distinct visual gaze patterns associated with the prompt detection of bile duct injury risk during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. METHODS: Twenty-nine participants viewed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy that led to a serious bile duct injury ('BDI video') and an uneventful procedure ('control video') and reported when an error was perceived that could result in bile duct injury. Outcome parameters include fixation sequences on anatomical structures and eye tracking metrics. Surgeons were stratified into two groups based on performance and compared. RESULTS: The 'early detector' group displayed reduced common bile duct dwell time in the first half of the BDI video, as well as increased cystic duct dwell time and Calot's triangle glances count during Calot's triangle dissection in the control video. Machine learning based classification of fixation sequences demonstrated clear separability between early and late detector groups. CONCLUSION: There are discernible differences in gaze patterns associated with early recognition of impending bile duct injury. The results could be transitioned into real time and used as an intraoperative early warning system and in an educational setting to improve surgical safety and performance.

Journal article

Suwa Y, Joshi M, Poynter L, Endo I, Ashrafian H, Darzi Aet al., 2020, Obese patients and robotic colorectal surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis, BJS OPEN, ISSN: 2474-9842

Journal article

Davids J, Manivannan S, Darzi A, Giannarou S, Ashrafian H, Marcus HJet al., 2020, Simulation for skills training in neurosurgery: a systematic review, meta-analysis, and analysis of progressive scholarly acceptance., Neurosurgical Review, ISSN: 0344-5607

At a time of significant global unrest and uncertainty surrounding how the delivery of clinical training will unfold over the coming years, we offer a systematic review, meta-analysis, and bibliometric analysis of global studies showing the crucial role simulation will play in training. Our aim was to determine the types of simulators in use, their effectiveness in improving clinical skills, and whether we have reached a point of global acceptance. A PRISMA-guided global systematic review of the neurosurgical simulators available, a meta-analysis of their effectiveness, and an extended analysis of their progressive scholarly acceptance on studies meeting our inclusion criteria of simulation in neurosurgical education were performed. Improvement in procedural knowledge and technical skills was evaluated. Of the identified 7405 studies, 56 studies met the inclusion criteria, collectively reporting 50 simulator types ranging from cadaveric, low-fidelity, and part-task to virtual reality (VR) simulators. In all, 32 studies were included in the meta-analysis, including 7 randomised controlled trials. A random effects, ratio of means effects measure quantified statistically significant improvement in procedural knowledge by 50.2% (ES 0.502; CI 0.355; 0.649, p < 0.001), technical skill including accuracy by 32.5% (ES 0.325; CI - 0.482; - 0.167, p < 0.001), and speed by 25% (ES - 0.25, CI - 0.399; - 0.107, p < 0.001). The initial number of VR studies (n = 91) was approximately double the number of refining studies (n = 45) indicating it is yet to reach progressive scholarly acceptance. There is strong evidence for a beneficial impact of adopting simulation in the improvement of procedural knowledge and technical skill. We show a growing trend towards the adoption of neurosurgical simulators, although we have not fully gained progressive scholarly acceptance for VR-based simulation technologies in neurosurgical education.

Journal article

Singh H, Patel R, Darzi A, Leff D, Singh Het al., 2020, The Impact of tDCS on fNIRS Haemodynamic Responses During a Surgical Task: A Pilot Study, London Surgical Symposium 2020

Conference paper

Shaw A, Flott K, Fontana G, Durkin M, Darzi Aet al., 2020, No patient safety without health worker safety., Lancet

Journal article

Dawidziuk A, Patel R, Darzi A, Leff D, Singh Het al., 2020, Using Optical Neuroimaging to Reveal Mechanisms of Augmentation by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (TES): A Systematic Review, Brainbox Initiative Virtual Conference 2020

Conference paper

Soukup T, Murtagh GM, Lamb BW, Bali A, Gandamihardja T, Darzi A, Green JSA, Sevdalis Net al., 2020, Gaps and overlaps in cancer multidisciplinary team communication: analysis of speech, Small Group Research, Pages: 104649642094849-104649642094849, ISSN: 1046-4964

Guided by the principles of conversation analysis, we examined the communication practices used to negotiate levels of participation in cancer multidisciplinary team meetings and their implications for patient safety. Three cancer teams participated. Thirty-six weekly meetings were video recorded, encompassing 822 case reviews. A cross-section was transcribed using Jefferson notation. We found a low frequency of gaps between speakers (3%), high frequency of overlaps (24%), and no-gaps-no-overlaps (73%), suggesting fast turn transitions. Securing a turn to speak is challenging due to a systematic reduction in turn-taking opportunities. We contribute to group research with the development of a microlevel methodology for studying multidisciplinary teams.

Journal article

Riley S, Ainslie KEC, Eales O, Walters CE, Wang H, Atchison CJ, Fronterre C, Diggle PJ, Ashby D, Donnelly CA, Cooke G, Barclay W, Ward H, Darzi A, Elliott Pet al., 2020, Resurgence of SARS-CoV-2 in England: detection by community antigen surveillance

<jats:p>BackgroundBased on cases and deaths, transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in England peaked in late March and early April 2020 and then declined until the end of June. Since the start of July, cases have increased, while deaths have continued to decrease.MethodsWe report results from 594,000 swabs tested for SARS-CoV-2 virus obtained from a representative sample of people in England over four rounds collected regardless of symptoms, starting in May 2020 and finishing at the beginning of September 2020. Swabs for the most recent two rounds were taken between 24th July and 11th August and for round 4 between 22nd August and 7th September. We estimate weighted overall prevalence, doubling times between and within rounds and associated reproduction numbers. We obtained unweighted prevalence estimates by sub-groups: age, sex, region, ethnicity, key worker status, household size, for which we also estimated odds of infection. We identified clusters of swab-positive participants who were closer, on average, to other swab-positiveparticipants than would be expected.FindingsOver all four rounds of the study, we found that 72% (67%, 76%) of swab-positive individuals were asymptomatic at the time of swab and in the week prior. The epidemic declined between rounds 1 and 2, and rounds 2 and 3. However, the epidemic was increasing between rounds 3 and 4, with a doubling time of 17 (13, 23) days corresponding to an R value of 1.3 (1.2, 1.4). When analysing round 3 alone, we found that the epidemic had started to grow again with 93% probability. Using only the most recent round 4 data, we estimated a doubling time of 7.7 (5.5, 12.7) days, corresponding to an R value of 1.7 (1.4, 2.0). Cycle threshold values were lower (viral loads were higher) for rounds 1 and 4 than they were for rounds 2 and 3. In round 4, we observed the highest prevalence in participants aged 18 to 24 years at 0.25% (0.16%, 0.41%), increasing from 0.08% (0.04%, 0.18%) in round 3. We observed the lowest prev

Journal article

Liu X, Rivera SC, Moher D, Calvert MJ, Denniston AK, Ashrafian H, Beam AL, Chan A-W, Collins GS, Darzi A, Deeks JJ, ElZarrad MK, Espinoza C, Esteva A, Faes L, Di Ruffano LF, Fletcher J, Golub R, Harvey H, Haug C, Holmes C, Jonas A, Keane PA, Kelly CJ, Lee AY, Lee CS, Manna E, Matcham J, McCradden M, Monteiro J, Mulrow C, Oakden-Rayner L, Paltoo D, Panico MB, Price G, Rowley S, Savage R, Sarkar R, Vollmer SJ, Yau Cet al., 2020, Reporting guidelines for clinical trial reports for interventions involving artificial intelligence: the CONSORT-AI Extension, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 370, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Rivera SC, Liu X, Chan A-W, Denniston AK, Calvert MJ, Ashrafian H, Beam AL, Collins GS, Darzi A, Deeks JJ, ElZarrad MK, Espinoza C, Esteva A, Faes L, Di Ruffano LF, Fletcher J, Golub R, Harvey H, Haug C, Holmes C, Jonas A, Keane PA, Kelly CJ, Lee AY, Lee CS, Manna E, Matcham J, McCradden M, Moher D, Monteiro J, Mulrow C, Oakden-Rayner L, Paltoo D, Panico MB, Price G, Rowley S, Savage R, Sarkar R, Vollmer SJ, Yau Cet al., 2020, Guidelines for clinical trial protocols for interventions involving artificial intelligence: the SPIRIT-AI Extension, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 370, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Sounderajah V, Patel V, Varatharajan L, Harling L, Normahani P, Symons J, Barlow J, Darzi A, Ashrafian Het al., 2020, Are disruptive innovations recognised in the healthcare literature? A systematic review, BMJ Innovations, ISSN: 2055-8074

<jats:p>The study aims to conduct a systematic review to characterise the spread and use of the concept of ‘disruptive innovation’ within the healthcare sector. We aim to categorise references to the concept over time, across geographical regions and across prespecified healthcare domains. From this, we further aim to critique and challenge the sector-specific use of the concept. PubMed, Medline, Embase, Global Health, PsycINFO, Maternity and Infant Care, and Health Management Information Consortium were searched from inception to August 2019 for references pertaining to disruptive innovations within the healthcare industry. The heterogeneity of the articles precluded a meta-analysis, and neither quality scoring of articles nor risk of bias analyses were required. 245 articles that detailed perceived disruptive innovations within the health sector were identified. The disruptive innovations were categorised into seven domains: basic science (19.2%), device (12.2%), diagnostics (4.9%), digital health (21.6%), education (5.3%), processes (17.6%) and technique (19.2%). The term has been used with increasing frequency annually and is predominantly cited in North American (78.4%) and European (15.2%) articles. The five most cited disruptive innovations in healthcare are ‘omics’ technologies, mobile health applications, telemedicine, health informatics and retail clinics. The concept ‘disruptive innovation’ has diffused into the healthcare industry. However, its use remains inconsistent and the recognition of disruption is obscured by other types of innovation. The current definition does not accommodate for prospective scouting of disruptive innovations, a likely hindrance to policy makers. Redefining disruptive innovation within the healthcare sector is therefore crucial for prospectively identifying cost-effective innovations.</jats:p>

Journal article

Smalley K, Aufegger L, Flott K, Mayer E, Darzi Aet al., 2020, Can self-management programmes change healthcare utilisation in COPD?: A systematic review and framework analysis, Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN: 0738-3991

ObjectiveThe study aims to evaluate the ability of self-management programmes to change the healthcare-seeking behaviours of people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and any associations between programme design and outcomes.MethodsA systematic search of the literature returned randomised controlled trials of SMPs for COPD. Change in healthcare utilisation was the primary outcome measure. Programme design was analysed using the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF).ResultsA total of 26 papers described 19 SMPs. The most common utilisation outcome was hospitalisation (n = 22). Of these, 5 showed a significant decrease. Two theoretical domains were evidenced in all programmes: skills and behavioural regulation. All programmes evidenced at least 5 domains. However, there was no clear association between TDF domains and utilisation. Overall, study quality was moderate to poor.ConclusionThis review highlights the need for more alignment in the goals, design, and evaluation of SMPs. Specifically, the TDF could be used to guide programme design and evaluation in future.Practice implicationsPractices have a reasonable expectation that interventions they adopt will provide patient benefit and value for money. Better design and reporting of SMP trials would address their ability to do so.

Journal article

Ghafur S, Van Dael J, Leis M, Darzi A, Sheikh Aet al., 2020, Public perceptions on data sharing: key insights from the UK and the USA, The Lancet Digital Health, Vol: 2, Pages: E444-E446, ISSN: 2589-7500

Journal article

Cruz Rivera S, Liu X, Chan A-W, Denniston AK, Calvert MJ, SPIRIT-AI and CONSORT-AI Working Group, SPIRIT-AI and CONSORT-AI Steering Group, SPIRIT-AI and CONSORT-AI Consensus Groupet al., 2020, Guidelines for clinical trial protocols for interventions involving artificial intelligence: the SPIRIT-AI extension., Nat Med, Vol: 26, Pages: 1351-1363

The SPIRIT 2013 statement aims to improve the completeness of clinical trial protocol reporting by providing evidence-based recommendations for the minimum set of items to be addressed. This guidance has been instrumental in promoting transparent evaluation of new interventions. More recently, there has been a growing recognition that interventions involving artificial intelligence (AI) need to undergo rigorous, prospective evaluation to demonstrate their impact on health outcomes. The SPIRIT-AI (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials-Artificial Intelligence) extension is a new reporting guideline for clinical trial protocols evaluating interventions with an AI component. It was developed in parallel with its companion statement for trial reports: CONSORT-AI (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials-Artificial Intelligence). Both guidelines were developed through a staged consensus process involving literature review and expert consultation to generate 26 candidate items, which were consulted upon by an international multi-stakeholder group in a two-stage Delphi survey (103 stakeholders), agreed upon in a consensus meeting (31 stakeholders) and refined through a checklist pilot (34 participants). The SPIRIT-AI extension includes 15 new items that were considered sufficiently important for clinical trial protocols of AI interventions. These new items should be routinely reported in addition to the core SPIRIT 2013 items. SPIRIT-AI recommends that investigators provide clear descriptions of the AI intervention, including instructions and skills required for use, the setting in which the AI intervention will be integrated, considerations for the handling of input and output data, the human-AI interaction and analysis of error cases. SPIRIT-AI will help promote transparency and completeness for clinical trial protocols for AI interventions. Its use will assist editors and peer reviewers, as well as the general readership, to understand, int

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2020, The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on colorectal cancer service provision, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 107, Pages: E521-E522, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Neves AL, Smalley K, Freise L, Harrison P, Darzi A, Mayer Eet al., 2020, Sharing electronic health records with patients - Who is using the Care Information Exchange portal? A cross-sectional study., Publisher: JMIR Preprints

Working paper

Ward H, Atchison C, Whitaker M, Ainslie K, Elliot J, Okell L, Redd R, Ashby D, Donnelly C, Barclay W, Darzi A, Cooke G, Riley S, Elliot Pet al., 2020, Antibody prevalence for SARS-CoV-2 in England following first peak of the pandemic: REACT2 study in 100,000 adults, Publisher: bioRxiv

Background England, UK has experienced a large outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infection. As in USA and elsewhere, disadvantaged communities have been disproportionately affected. Methods National REal-time Assessment of Community Transmission-2 (REACT-2) seroprevalence study using self-administered lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) test for IgG among a random population sample of 100,000 adults over 18 years in England, 20 June to 13 July 2020. Results Completed questionnaires were available for 109,076 participants, yielding 5,544 IgG positive results and adjusted (for test performance), re-weighted (for sampling) prevalence of 6.0% (95% CI: 5.8, 6.1). Highest prevalence was in London (13.0% [12.3, 13.6]), among people of Black or Asian (mainly South Asian) ethnicity (17.3% [15.8, 19.1] and 11.9% [11.0, 12.8] respectively) and those aged 18-24 years (7.9% [7.3, 8.5]). Care home workers with client-facing roles had adjusted odds ratio of 3.1 (2.5, 3.8) compared with non-essential workers. One third (32.2%, [31.0-33.4]) of antibody positive individuals reported no symptoms. Among symptomatic cases, the majority (78.8%) reported symptoms during the peak of the epidemic in England in March (31.3%) and April (47.5%) 2020. We estimate that 3.36 million (3.21, 3.51) people have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 in England to end June 2020, with an overall infection fatality ratio of 0.90% (0.86, 0.94). Conclusion The pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 infection in England disproportionately affected ethnic minority groups and health and care home workers. The higher risk of infection in these groups may explain, at least in part, their increased risk of hospitalisation and mortality from COVID-19.

Working paper

Soukup T, Lamb BW, Morbi A, Shah NJ, Bali A, Asher V, Gandamihardja T, Giordano P, Darzi A, Green JSA, Sevdalis Net al., 2020, A multicentre cross-sectional observational study of cancer multidisciplinary teams: Analysis of team decision making, CANCER MEDICINE, Vol: 9, Pages: 7083-7099, ISSN: 2045-7634

Journal article

Atchison C, PristerĂ  P, Cooper E, Papageorgiou V, Redd R, Piggin M, Flower B, Fontana G, Satkunarajah S, Ashrafian H, Lawrence-Jones A, Naar L, Chigwende J, Gibbard S, Riley S, Darzi A, Elliott P, Ashby D, Barclay W, Cooke GS, Ward Het al., 2020, Usability and acceptability of home-based self-testing for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies for population surveillance., Clinical Infectious Diseases, ISSN: 1058-4838

BACKGROUND: This study assesses acceptability and usability of home-based self-testing for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA). METHODS: We carried out public involvement and pilot testing in 315 volunteers to improve usability. Feedback was obtained through online discussions, questionnaires, observations and interviews of people who tried the test at home. This informed the design of a nationally representative survey of adults in England using two LFIAs (LFIA1 and LFIA2) which were sent to 10,600 and 3,800 participants, respectively, who provided further feedback. RESULTS: Public involvement and pilot testing showed high levels of acceptability, but limitations with the usability of kits. Most people reported completing the test; however, they identified difficulties with practical aspects of the kit, particularly the lancet and pipette, a need for clearer instructions and more guidance on interpretation of results. In the national study, 99.3% (8,693/8,754) of LFIA1 and 98.4% (2,911/2,957) of LFIA2 respondents attempted the test and 97.5% and 97.8% of respondents completed it, respectively. Most found the instructions easy to understand, but some reported difficulties using the pipette (LFIA1: 17.7%) and applying the blood drop to the cassette (LFIA2: 31.3%). Most respondents obtained a valid result (LFIA1: 91.5%; LFIA2: 94.4%). Overall there was substantial concordance between participant and clinician interpreted results (kappa: LFIA1 0.72; LFIA2 0.89). CONCLUSION: Impactful public involvement is feasible in a rapid response setting. Home self-testing with LFIAs can be used with a high degree of acceptability and usability by adults, making them a good option for use in seroprevalence surveys.

Journal article

Flower B, Brown JC, Simmons B, Moshe M, Frise R, Penn R, Kugathasan R, Petersen C, Daunt A, Ashby D, Riley S, Atchison C, Taylor GP, Satkunarajah S, Naar L, Klaber R, Badhan A, Rosadas C, Kahn M, Fernandez N, Sureda-Vives M, Cheeseman H, O'Hara J, Fontana G, Pallett SJC, Rayment M, Jones R, Moore LSP, Cherapanov P, Tedder R, McClure M, Ashrafian H, Shattock R, Ward H, Darzi A, Elliott P, Barclay W, Cooke Get al., 2020, Clinical and laboratory evaluation of SARS-CoV-2 lateral flow assays for use in a national COVID-19 sero-prevalence survey, Thorax, ISSN: 0040-6376

BackgroundAccurate antibody tests are essential to monitor the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) can deliver testing at scale. However, reported performance varies, and sensitivity analyses have generally been conducted on serum from hospitalised patients. For use in community testing, evaluation of finger-prick self-tests, in non-hospitalised individuals, is required.MethodsSensitivity analysis was conducted on 276 non-hospitalised participants. All had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR and were ≥21d from symptom-onset. In phase I we evaluated five LFIAs in clinic (with finger-prick) and laboratory (with blood and sera) in comparison to a) PCR-confirmed infection and b) presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies on two “in-house” ELISAs. Specificity analysis was performed on 500 pre-pandemic sera. In phase II, six additional LFIAs were assessed with serum.Findings95% (95%CI [92.2, 97.3]) of the infected cohort had detectable antibodies on at least one ELISA. LFIA sensitivity was variable, but significantly inferior to ELISA in 8/11 assessed. Of LFIAs assessed in both clinic and laboratory, finger-prick self-test sensitivity varied from 21%-92% vs PCR-confirmed cases and 22%-96% vs composite ELISA positives. Concordance between finger-prick and serum testing was at best moderate (kappa 0.56) and, at worst, slight (kappa 0.13). All LFIAs had high specificity (97.2% - 99.8%).InterpretationLFIA sensitivity and sample concordance is variable, highlighting the importance of evaluations in setting of intended use. This rigorous approach to LFIA evaluation identified a test with high specificity (98.6% (95%CI [97.1, 99.4])), moderate sensitivity (84.4% with fingerprick (95%CI [70.5, 93.5])), and moderate concordance, suitable for seroprevalence surveys.

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2020, CRC COVID: Colorectal cancer services during COVID-19 pandemic. studyprotocol for service evaluation, International Journal of Surgery Protocols, Vol: 23, Pages: 15-19, ISSN: 2468-3574

IntroductionCOVID-19 has had an impact on the provision of colorectal cancer care. The aim of the CRC COVID study is to describe the changes in colorectal cancer services in the UK and USA in response to the pandemic and to understand the long-term impact.Methods and analysisThis study comprises 4 phases. Phase 1 is a survey of colorectal units that aims to evaluate adherences and deviations from the best practice guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic. Phase 2 is a monthly prospective data collection of service provision that aims to determine the impact of the service modifications on the long-term cancer specific outcomes compared to the national standards. Phase 3 aims to predict costs attributable to the modifications of the CRC services and additional resources required to treat patients whose treatment has been affected by the pandemic. Phase 4 aims to compare the impact of COVID-19 on the NHS and USA model of healthcare in terms of service provision and cost, and to propose a standardised model of delivering colorectal cancer services for future outbreaks.

Journal article

Riley S, Ainslie KEC, Eales O, Walters CE, Wang H, Atchison CJ, Diggle P, Ashby D, Donnelly CA, Cooke G, Barclay W, Ward H, Darzi A, Elliott Pet al., 2020, Transient dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 as England exited national lockdown

<jats:p>Control of the COVID-19 pandemic requires a detailed understanding of prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the population. Case-based surveillance is necessarily biased towards symptomatic individuals and sensitive to varying patterns of reporting in space and time. The real-time assessment of community transmission antigen study (REACT-1) is designed to overcome these limitations by obtaining prevalence data based on a nose and throat swab RT-PCR test among a representative community-based sample in England, including asymptomatic individuals. Here, we describe results comparing rounds 1 and 2 carried out during May and mid June / early July 2020 respectively across 315 lower tier local authority areas. In round 1 we found 159 positive samples from 120,620 tested swabs while round 2 there were 123 positive samples from 159,199 tested swabs, indicating a downwards trend in prevalence from 0.13% (95% CI, 0.11%, 0.15%) to 0.077% (0.065%, 0.092%), a halving time of 38 (28, 58) days, and an R of 0.89 (0.86, 0.93). The proportion of swab-positive participants who were asymptomatic at the time of sampling increased from 69% (61%, 76%) in round 1 to 81% (73%, 87%) in round 2. Although health care and care home workers were infected far more frequently than other workers in round 1, the odds were markedly reduced in round 2. Age patterns of infection changed between rounds, with a reduction by a factor of five in prevalence in 18 to 24 year olds. Our data were suggestive of increased risk of infection in Black and Asian (mainly South Asian) ethnicities. Using regional and detailed case location data, we detected increased infection intensity in and near London. Under multiple sensitivity analyses, our results were robust to the possibility of false positives. At the end of the initial lockdown in England, we found continued decline in prevalence and a shift in the pattern of infection by age and occupation. Community-based sampling, including asymptomatic individ

Journal article

Viner RM, Bonell C, Drake L, Jourdan D, Davies N, Baltag V, Jerrim J, Proimos J, Darzi Aet al., 2020, Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic: governments must balance the uncertainty and risks of reopening schools against the clear harms associated with prolonged closure, Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00171825&limit=30&person=true