Imperial College London

DrAdamHampshire

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Senior Lecturer in Restorative Neurosciences
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7993a.hampshire

 
 
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Location

 

Burlington DanesHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Summary

I am a Senior Lecturer in the Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, which is part of the Department of Medicine's Division of Brain Sciences.

The overarching aim of my research is to derive a better understanding of how task active networks in the human brain support key aspects of cognition such as attention, motor response inhibition, working memory, planning and reasoning, and how these aspects of cognition are affected in the pathological brain. I apply a wide range of techniques in pursuit of this aim including functional and structural brain imaging, genotyping, machine learning and computational modelling.

I also have a particular interest in the potential applications of technologies that can be used to apply cognitive testing and training in the home. For example, Apps and websites that can assess large-scale cohorts, track clinical populations longitudinally, or deliver cognitive training regimes. 

If you are a student who is interested in undertaking PhD or postdoctoral research in my lab then please feel free to email me directly at a.hampshire_at_imperial.ac.uk.

Selected Publications

Journal Articles

Corbett A, Owen A, Hampshire A, et al., 2015, The Effect of an Online Cognitive Training Package in Healthy Older Adults: An Online Randomized Controlled Trial, Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol:16, ISSN:1525-8610, Pages:990-997

Hampshire A, Sharp DJ, 2015, Contrasting network and modular perspectives on inhibitory control, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol:19, ISSN:1364-6613, Pages:445-452

Parkin BL, Hellyer PJ, Leech R, et al., 2015, Dynamic Network Mechanisms of Relational Integration, Journal of Neuroscience, Vol:35, ISSN:0270-6474, Pages:7660-7673

Hampshire A, 2015, Putting the brakes on inhibitory models of frontal lobe function, Neuroimage, Vol:113, ISSN:1053-8119, Pages:340-355

Winder-Rhodes SE, Hampshire A, Rowe JB, et al., 2015, Association between MAPT haplotype and memory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy aging individuals., Neurobiol Aging, Vol:36, Pages:1519-1528

Scott G, Hellyer PJ, Hampshire A, et al., 2015, Exploring Spatiotemporal Network Transitions in Task Functional MRI, Human Brain Mapping, Vol:36, ISSN:1065-9471, Pages:1348-1364

Nombela C, Rowe JB, Winder-Rhodes SE, et al., 2014, Genetic impact on cognition and brain function in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study, Brain, Vol:137, ISSN:0006-8950, Pages:2743-2758

Erika-Florence M, Leech R, Hampshire A, 2014, A functional network perspective on response inhibition and attentional control, Nature Communications, Vol:5, ISSN:2041-1723

Hampshire A, MacDonald A, Owen AM, 2013, Hypoconnectivity and hyperfrontality in retired American football players., Sci Rep, Vol:3

Hampshire A, Parkin BL, Cusack R, et al., 2013, Assessing residual reasoning ability in overtly non-communicative patients using fMRI, Neuroimage: Clinical, Vol:2, Pages:174-183

Hampshire A, Highfield RR, Parkin BL, et al., 2012, Fractionating human intelligence., Neuron, Vol:76, Pages:1225-1237

Hampshire A, Thompson R, Duncan J, et al., 2011, Lateral prefrontal cortex subregions make dissociable contributions during fluid reasoning., Cereb Cortex, Vol:21, Pages:1-10

Owen AM, Hampshire A, Grahn JA, et al., 2010, Putting brain training to the test, Nature, Vol:465, ISSN:0028-0836, Pages:775-U6

Hampshire A, Chamberlain SR, Monti MM, et al., 2010, The role of the right inferior frontal gyrus: inhibition and attentional control., Neuroimage, Vol:50, Pages:1313-1319

Chamberlain SR, Menzies L, Hampshire A, et al., 2008, Orbitofrontal dysfunction in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and their unaffected relatives., Science, Vol:321, Pages:421-422

Williams-Gray CH, Hampshire A, Barker RA, et al., 2008, Attentional control in Parkinson's disease is dependent on COMT val 158 met genotype., Brain, Vol:131, Pages:397-408

Hampshire A, Owen AM, 2006, Fractionating attentional control using event-related fMRI., Cerebral Cortex, Vol:16, ISSN:1047-3211, Pages:1679-1689

More Publications