Imperial College London

Professor SirAnthonyNewman Taylor

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

President's Envoy for Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2983a.newmant

 
 
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Assistant

 

Mrs Eunice Haining +44 (0)20 7594 2983

 
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Location

 

4.19Guy Scadding BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

116 results found

Cullinan P, McGavin CR, Kreiss K, Nicholson AG, Maher TM, Howell T, Banks J, Taylor AJN, Chen C-H, Tsai P-J, Shih T-S, Burge PSet al., 2013, Obliterative bronchiolitis in fibreglass workers: a new occupational disease?, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 70, Pages: 357-359, ISSN: 1351-0711

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris JM, Johnston IDA, Rudd R, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2010, Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis and lung cancer: the BTS study, THORAX, Vol: 65, Pages: 70-76, ISSN: 0040-6376

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Brant A, Upchurch S, van Tongeren M, Zekveld C, Helm J, Barnes F, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2009, Detergent protease exposure and respiratory disease: case-referent analysis of a retrospective cohort, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 66, Pages: 754-758, ISSN: 1351-0711

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Copley SJ, Lee YCG, Hansell DM, Sivakumaran P, Rubens MB, Newman Taylor AJ, Rudd RM, Musk AW, Wells AUet al., 2007, Asbestos-induced and smoking-related disease: Apportioning pulmonary function deficit by using thin-section CT, RADIOLOGY, Vol: 242, Pages: 258-266, ISSN: 0033-8419

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris JM, Mills P, White C, Moffat S, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2007, Recorded infections and antibiotics in early life: associations with allergy in UK children and their parents, THORAX, Vol: 62, Pages: 631-637, ISSN: 0040-6376

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris JM, Williams HC, White C, Moffat S, Mills P, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2007, Early allergen exposure and atopic eczema, BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, Vol: 156, Pages: 698-704, ISSN: 0007-0963

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sozanska B, MacNeill SJ, Kajderowicz-Kowalik M, Danielewicz H, Wheatley M, Taylor AJN, Boznanski A, Cullinan Pet al., 2007, Atopy and asthma in rural Poland: a paradigm for the emergence of childhood respiratory allergies in Europe, ALLERGY, Vol: 62, Pages: 394-400, ISSN: 0105-4538

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Torrent M, Sunyer J, Garcia R, Harris J, Iturriaga MV, Puig C, Vall O, Anto JM, Newman Taylor AJ, Cullinan Pet al., 2007, Early-life allergen exposure and atopy, asthma, and wheeze up to 6 years of age., Am J Respir Crit Care Med, Vol: 176, Pages: 446-453, ISSN: 1073-449X

RATIONALE: Although it is widely assumed that the incidence of childhood respiratory allergies to common aeroallergens is directly related to allergen exposure in early life, few longitudinal studies have investigated this issue, and available data are scarce and mainly limited to high-risk groups. OBJECTIVES: To assess, in a prospective manner and in a general population, the role of early life exposures to Der p1 and Fel d1 on the inception of sensitization and asthma. METHODS: Pregnant women and their children were recruited for the Asthma Multicentre Infant Cohort Study. Overall, 1,611 newborns were initially enrolled in three cohorts in the United Kingdom and Spain. Der p1 and Fel d1 allergens were measured in household dust samples at 3 months of age for 1,474 (91.5%) participants, and skin prick tests were performed at 6 years of age on 1,182 (80.2%) participants. Wheeze and diagnosed asthma were reported in yearly questionnaires. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Exposure to Der p1 early in life was not related to a positive specific prick test or to asthma or persistent wheeze at 6 years of age. Fel d1 showed an association with all these outcomes (third vs. first tertile; odds ratio, 4.43 for positive specific prick test and 2.6 for diagnosed asthma). CONCLUSIONS: Dose-response relationships between allergen exposure and sensitization or asthma may be allergen specific and nonlinear; a minimum threshold level is needed to induce sensitization, but no dose-response relationship exists above this level. The effect of a particular allergen seems to be similar on atopy and asthma inception.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Boyton RJ, Reynolds C, Wahid FN, Jones MG, Ozerovitch L, Ahmad T, Chaudhry A, Jewell DP, Kon OM, Smith J, Rose M, Newman-Taylor AJ, Cole P, Wilson R, Altmann DMet al., 2006, IFN gamma and CXCR-1 gene polymorphisms in idiopathic bronchiectasis, TISSUE ANTIGENS, Vol: 68, Pages: 325-330, ISSN: 0001-2815

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jones MG, Floyd A, Nouri-Aria KT, Jacobson MR, Durham SR, Taylor AN, Cullinan Pet al., 2006, Is occupational asthma to diisocyanates a non-IgE-mediated disease?, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 117, Pages: 663-669, ISSN: 0091-6749

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zekveld C, Bibakis I, Bibaki-Liakou V, Pedioti A, Dimitroulis I, Harris J, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2006, The effects of farming and birth order on asthma and allergies, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 28, Pages: 82-88, ISSN: 0903-1936

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bibakis I, Zekveld C, Dimitroulis I, Pedioti A, Gerakianaki T, Fanourgiaki S, Kokiadi I, Iliakou-Bibakis V, Taylor AJN, Stanford CA, Stanford JL, Cullinan Pet al., 2005, Childhood atopy and allergic disease and skin test responses to environmental mycobacteria in rural Crete: a cross-sectional survey, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 35, Pages: 624-629, ISSN: 0954-7894

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Brant A, Nightingale S, Berriman J, Sharp C, Welch J, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2005, Supermarket baker's asthma: how accurate is routine health surveillance?, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 62, Pages: 395-399, ISSN: 1351-0711

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Newman Taylor AJ, Cullinan P, Burge PS, Nicholson P, Boyle Cet al., 2005, BOHRF guidelines for occupational asthma., Thorax, Vol: 60, Pages: 364-366, ISSN: 0040-6376

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cullinan P, Harris J, Mills P, Moffat S, White C, Figg J, Moon A, Taylor AJNet al., 2004, Early prescriptions of antibiotics and the risk of allergic disease in adults: a cohort study, THORAX, Vol: 59, Pages: 11-15, ISSN: 0040-6376

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cullinan P, MacNeill SJ, Harris JM, Moffat S, White C, Mills P, Taylor AJNet al., 2004, Early allergen exposure, skin prick responses, and atopic wheeze at age 5 in English children: a cohort study, THORAX, Vol: 59, Pages: 855-861, ISSN: 0040-6376

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris JM, White C, Moffat S, Mills P, Taylor AJN, Cullinan Pet al., 2004, New pregnancies and loss of allergy, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 34, Pages: 369-372, ISSN: 0954-7894

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cullinan P, Harris JM, Taylor AJN, Jones M, Taylor P, Dave JR, Mills P, Moffat SA, White CW, Figg JK, Moon AM, Barnes MCet al., 2003, Can early infection explain the sibling effect in adult atopy?, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 22, Pages: 956-961, ISSN: 0903-1936

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gautrin D, Newman-Taylor AJ, Nordman H, Malo JLet al., 2003, Controversies in epidemiology of occupational asthma, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 22, Pages: 551-559, ISSN: 0903-1936

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Putcha V, Gordon S, Heederik D, Venables KM, Cullinan P, Newman-Taylor AJet al., 2003, Exposure-response relations among laboratory animal workers exposed to rats, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 60, Pages: 104-108, ISSN: 1351-0711

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barnes M, Cullinan P, Athanasaki P, Macneill S, Hole AM, Harris J, Kalogeraki S, Chatzinikolaou M, Drakonakis N, Bibaki-Liakou V, Taylor AJN, Bibakis Iet al., 2001, Crete: does farming explain urban and rural differences in atopy?, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 1822-1828, ISSN: 0954-7894

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cullinan P, Cook A, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Sandiford C, Tee RD, Venables KM, McDonald JC, Taylor AJNet al., 2001, Allergen and dust exposure as determinants of work-related symptoms and sensitization in a cohort of flour-exposed workers; a case-control analysis, ANNALS OF OCCUPATIONAL HYGIENE, Vol: 45, Pages: 97-103, ISSN: 0003-4878

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Floyd AE, Nouri-Aria KT, Jacobson MR, Hole AM, Jones MG, Cullinan P, Newman-Taylor AJ, Durham SRet al., 2001, Allergen, but not isocyanate-induced, C epsilon RNA expression after challenge, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 1149-1149, ISSN: 0954-7894

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gordon S, Tee RD, Stuart MC, Newman Taylor AJet al., 2001, Analysis of allergens in rat fur and saliva., Allergy, Vol: 56, Pages: 563-567, ISSN: 0105-4538

BACKGROUND: The fur is an important source of allergens in many mammal species, but this source has not been extensively studied in rats. Rat room dust contains high-molecular-weight allergens that have been found to cross-react with fur and its presumed salivary contaminants. The role of rat fur and saliva as a source of respiratory allergens merits further investigation. The objective was to describe the allergens present in the fur and saliva of male rats. METHODS: Allergen extracts were prepared from the saliva and fur of the pelts from adult male rats. Immunoblotting was used to describe the allergens present in rat fur and saliva with serum from 76 and 25 individuals, respectively. RESULTS: There was considerable variation between the individuals in the binding of IgE to the separated fur and saliva allergens. Immunoblot analysis identified 23 allergens in rat fur. "Major" allergens were found at the "origin", and at 55, 51, 19, and 17 kDa, and "intermediate" allergens at 74, 67 (probably albumin), and 21.5 (diffuse) kDa. Seventeen salivary allergens were described with "major" allergens at 21.5, 19.5, 19, 18, and 17.5 kDa. Many subjects had IgE to the 67 kDa (56%) and 43 kDa (64%) allergens but the density of staining was weak. CONCLUSION: Rat fur and saliva are the sources of many allergens. Fur contained five "major" allergens and was a complex source of allergens of relatively high molecular weight (>22 kDa). The most important salivary allergens have molecular weights of less than 22 kDa. Fur is the most probable source of the high-molecular-weight allergens found in rat room dust.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris JM, Cullinan P, Williams HC, Mills P, Moffat S, White C, Taylor AJNet al., 2001, Environmental associations with eczema in early life, BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, Vol: 144, Pages: 795-802, ISSN: 0007-0963

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Nicholson PJ, Newman Taylor AJ, Oliver P, Cathcart Met al., 2001, Current best practice for the health surveillance of enzyme workers in the soap and detergent industry., Occup Med (Lond), Vol: 51, Pages: 81-92, ISSN: 0962-7480

This study defines current best practice for the health surveillance of workers who are potentially exposed to enzymes in the manufacture of enzymatic detergent products. It is recommended that health surveillance is performed 6-monthly for the first 2 years and annually thereafter. The health surveillance programme should include a respiratory questionnaire to detect symptoms, assessment of lung function to detect pre-symptomatic changes and an immunological test to detect specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) to enzymes. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease respiratory questionnaire should be used since it has been validated extensively for detecting asthma. Operators should observe the American Thoracic Society performance criteria for spirometers and standardized procedures for conducting spirometry. Since current airborne monitoring techniques for enzymes do not detect short-duration peak exposures, the incidence of employee sensitizations remains the most reliable measure of the integrity of environmental control. The Pepys skin prick test has been validated as a sensitive, specific and practical test for detecting specific IgE to many inhalant allergens including enzymes. For newly sensitized workers, a multi-cause investigation should be conducted to identify potential sources of exposure. Group results of immunological test results assist in the evaluation of workplace control measures, and should be used to monitor the effectiveness of hygiene and engineering programmes and to help prioritize areas for improvement. Positive responses to a questionnaire or abnormal spirometry should be assessed further. Occupational asthma should be excluded in any case of adult-onset asthma that starts or deteriorates during working life. This is particularly important because an accurate diagnosis of occupational asthma with early avoidance of exposure to its cause can result in remission of symptoms and restoration of lung function.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sunyer J, Anto JM, Harris J, Torrent M, Vall O, Cullinan P, Newman-Taylor Aet al., 2001, Maternal atopy and parity, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 1352-1355, ISSN: 0954-7894

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Taylor AN, 2001, Role of human leukocyte antigen phenotype and exposure in development of occupational asthma, Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol: 1, Pages: 157-161, ISSN: 1528-4050

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barker RD, van Tongeren MJA, Harris JM, Gardiner K, Venables KM, Taylor AJNet al., 2000, Risk factors for bronchial hyperresponsiveness in workers exposed to acid anhydrides, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 15, Pages: 710-715, ISSN: 0903-1936

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cullinan P, Harris JM, Taylor AJN, Hole AM, Jones M, Barnes F, Jolliffe Get al., 2000, An outbreak of asthma in a modern detergent factory, LANCET, Vol: 356, Pages: 1899-1900, ISSN: 0140-6736

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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