Imperial College London

DrAnneter Wal

Business School

Associate Professor of Technology & Innovation Management
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1460a.terwal CV

 
 
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Location

 

384Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

19 results found

Ter Wal ALJ, Criscuolo P, McEvily B, Salter Aet al., 2018, The relative value of the division versus duplication of network ties for innovation performance

© 2018 Academy of Management. All rights reserved. Exploiting a unique setting of R&D technologists and managers in a large multinational who are 'partnered-up' in their pursuit of innovation, this paper explores under what circumstances technologists and managers benefit from duplicating network ties to the same groups in the organization as their partner, or from dividing the network with their partner by each interacting with different groups. Introducing the concept of network duplication'the extent to which two individuals are tied to the same functional groups inside an organization'this paper aims to build and test a theory of the division versus duplication of networks. It advances our understanding of second-order social capital and its role in the interpretation and influencing aspects of the innovation process by shedding light on how network duplication affects technologists' and managers' innovation performance. It finds that the merits of a division versus duplication-of- networks approach are contingent on the mutual interdependence of managers and technologists.

CONFERENCE PAPER

Ter Wal ALJ, Criscuolo P, Salter A, 2017, Making a marriage of materials: The role of gatekeepers and shepherds in the absorption of external knowledge and innovation performance, RESEARCH POLICY, Vol: 46, Pages: 1039-1054, ISSN: 0048-7333

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bogers M, Zobel A-K, Afuah A, Almirall E, Brunswicker S, Dahlander L, Frederiksen L, Gawer A, Gruber M, Haefliger S, Hagedoorn J, Hilgers D, Laursen K, Magnusson MG, Majchrzak A, McCarthy IP, Moeslein KM, Nambisan S, Piller FT, Radziwon A, Rossi-Lamastra C, Sims J, Ter Wal ALJet al., 2017, The open innovation research landscape: established perspectives and emerging themes across different levels of analysis, INDUSTRY AND INNOVATION, Vol: 24, Pages: 8-40, ISSN: 1366-2716

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, Alexy O, Block J, Sandner PGet al., 2016, The Best of Both Worlds: The Benefits of Open-specialized and Closed-diverse Syndication Networks for New Ventures' Success, ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE QUARTERLY, Vol: 61, Pages: 393-432, ISSN: 0001-8392

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hardeman S, Frenken K, Nomaler O, Ter Wal ALJet al., 2015, Characterizing and comparing innovation systems by different 'modes' of knowledge production: A proximity approach, SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY, Vol: 42, Pages: 530-548, ISSN: 0302-3427

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Salter A, Ter Wal ALJ, Criscuolo P, Alexy Oet al., 2015, Open for Ideation: Individual-Level Openness and Idea Generation in R&D, JOURNAL OF PRODUCT INNOVATION MANAGEMENT, Vol: 32, Pages: 488-504, ISSN: 0737-6782

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Salter A, Criscuolo P, Ter Wal ALJ, 2014, Coping with Open Innovation: Responding to the Challenges of External Engagement in R&D, California Management Review, Vol: 56, Pages: 77-94, ISSN: 0008-1256

Open innovation often requires wholesale changes to the nature of R&D. However, academic research and managerial practice have paid little attention to the challenges that individuals face in the daily pursuit of open innovation. As a result, there is little understanding of how individuals cope with open innovation, and which organizational practices can support them in this role. Drawing on the experiences of R&D professionals, this article identifies four specific challenges and coping strategies of individuals engaged in open innovation. It proposes a range of open innovation practices that organizations can implement to better equip their staff to undertake effective external engagement.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Criscuolo P, Salter A, Ter Wal ALJ, 2014, Going Underground: Bootlegging and Individual Innovative Performance, ORGANIZATION SCIENCE, Vol: 25, Pages: 1287-1305, ISSN: 1047-7039

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, 2014, The dynamics of the inventor network in German biotechnology: geographic proximity versus triadic closure, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY, Vol: 14, Pages: 589-620, ISSN: 1468-2702

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, 2013, Cluster Emergence and Network Evolution: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Inventor Network in Sophia-Antipolis, REGIONAL STUDIES, Vol: 47, Pages: 651-668, ISSN: 0034-3404

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Alexy OT, Block JH, Sandner P, Ter Wal ALJet al., 2012, Social capital of venture capitalists and start-up funding, SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMICS, Vol: 39, Pages: 835-851, ISSN: 0921-898X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cassi L, Morrison A, Ter Wal ALJ, 2012, The Evolution of Trade and Scientific Collaboration Networks in the Global Wine Sector: A Longitudinal Study Using Network Analysis, ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY, Vol: 88, Pages: 311-334, ISSN: 0013-0095

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, 2011, Networks and geography in the economics of knowledge flows: a commentary, QUALITY & QUANTITY, Vol: 45, Pages: 1059-1063, ISSN: 0033-5177

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, Boschma R, 2011, Co-evolution of Firms, Industries and Networks in Space, REGIONAL STUDIES, Vol: 45, Pages: 919-933, ISSN: 0034-3404

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, 2010, The dynamics of the inventor network in German biotechnology: Geographical proximity versus triadic closure

This paper intends to contribute to the growing literature on network dynamics by critically assessing the spatial component in the dynamic analysis of networks. The paper juxtaposes geographical proximity and triadic closure ' i.e. the formation of closed triangles ' as two alternative mechanisms in the evolution of networks. It argues that the role of both mechanisms is subject to change over time as the technological regime of an industry changes. More precisely, the paper proposes that geographical proximity between inventors is mostly relevant for tie formation in the early stage of the industry, when knowledge is predominantly tacit. By contrast, the closed triangles as produced by triadic closure act as vehicles of trust gaining relevance once the industry gets more established, with higher levels of knowledge codification and the associated risk of unintended and costly knowledge leakages. These trends are empirically tested taking biotechnology in Germany as an example of an evolving, spatially agglomerated knowledge-intensive industry. On the basis of a patent-based reconstruction of the inventor network and a stochastic estimation model of network evolution, the study confirms that geographical proximity becomes less important and triadic closure more important over time as a determinant of tie formation.

CONFERENCE PAPER

Cantner U, Meder A, ter Wal ALJ, 2010, Innovator networks and regional knowledge base, TECHNOVATION, Vol: 30, Pages: 496-507, ISSN: 0166-4972

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal ALJ, Boschma RA, 2009, Applying social network analysis in economic geography: framing some key analytic issues, ANNALS OF REGIONAL SCIENCE, Vol: 43, Pages: 739-756, ISSN: 0570-1864

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ter Wal A, 2009, The structure and dynamics of knowledge networks: a proximity approach, Publisher: PhD thesis, ISBN: 978-90-6266-268-5

BOOK

Boschma R, Ter Wal ALJ, 2007, Knowledge networks and innovative performance in an industrial district: The case of a footwear district in the South of Italy, Industry and Innovation, Vol: 14, Pages: 177-199, ISSN: 1366-2716

The traditional district literature tends to assume that: (1) the competitiveness of firms depends on external sources of knowledge; (2) all firms in a district benefit from knowledge externalities; (3) relying on external knowledge relationships necessarily means these are confined to the district area. Our case study of the Barletta footwear district in the South of Italy suggests otherwise. Based on social network analysis, we demonstrate that the local knowledge network is quite weak and unevenly distributed among the local firms. A strong local network position of a firm tended to increase their innovative performance, and so did their connectivity to extra-local firms. So, it mattered being connected either locally or non-locally: being co-located was surely not enough. Having a high absorptive capacity seemed to raise only indirectly, through non-local relationships, the innovative performance of firms.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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