Imperial College London

DrAudreyde Nazelle

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7319anazelle Website

 
 
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Location

 

20416 Prince's GardensSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Dons:2017:10.1021/acs.est.6b05782,
author = {Dons, E and Laeremans, M and Orjuela, JP and Avila-Palencia, I and Carrasco-Turigas, G and Cole-Hunter, T and Anaya-Boig, E and Standaert, A and De, Boever P and Nawrot, T and Gotschi, T and de, Nazelle A and Nieuwenhuijsen, M and Panis, LI},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.6b05782},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
pages = {1859--1867},
title = {Wearable sensors for personal monitoring and estimation of inhaled traffic-related air pollution: evaluation of methods},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b05782},
volume = {51},
year = {2017}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Physical activity and ventilation rates have an effect on an individual’s dose and may be important to consider in exposure–response relationships; however, these factors are often ignored in environmental epidemiology studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate methods of estimating the inhaled dose of air pollution and understand variability in the absence of a true gold standard metric. Five types of methods were identified: (1) methods using (physical) activity types, (2) methods based on energy expenditure, METs (metabolic equivalents of task), and oxygen consumption, (3) methods based on heart rate or (4) breathing rate, and (5) methods that combine heart and breathing rate. Methods were compared using a real-life data set of 122 adults who wore devices to track movement, black carbon air pollution, and physiological health markers for 3 weeks in three European cities. Different methods for estimating minute ventilation performed well in relative terms with high correlations among different methods, but in absolute terms, ignoring increased ventilation during day-to-day activities could lead to an underestimation of the daily dose by a factor of 0.08–1.78. There is no single best method, and a multitude of methods are currently being used to approximate the dose. The choice of a suitable method for determining the dose in future studies will depend on both the size and the objectives of the study.
AU - Dons,E
AU - Laeremans,M
AU - Orjuela,JP
AU - Avila-Palencia,I
AU - Carrasco-Turigas,G
AU - Cole-Hunter,T
AU - Anaya-Boig,E
AU - Standaert,A
AU - De,Boever P
AU - Nawrot,T
AU - Gotschi,T
AU - de,Nazelle A
AU - Nieuwenhuijsen,M
AU - Panis,LI
DO - 10.1021/acs.est.6b05782
EP - 1867
PY - 2017///
SN - 0013-936X
SP - 1859
TI - Wearable sensors for personal monitoring and estimation of inhaled traffic-related air pollution: evaluation of methods
T2 - Environmental Science and Technology
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b05782
UR - http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000393738700097&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=1ba7043ffcc86c417c072aa74d649202
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/45509
VL - 51
ER -