Imperial College London

DrBrianRobertson

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Reader in Systems Microbiology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3198b.robertson

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Sophie Kemp +44 (0)20 7594 3199

 
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Location

 

3.41Flowers buildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

107 results found

Gideon HP, Wilkinson KA, Rustad TR, Oni T, Guio H, Sherman DR, Vordermeier HM, Robertson BD, Young DB, Wilkinson RJet al., 2012, Bioinformatic and Empirical Analysis of Novel Hypoxia-Inducible Targets of the Human Antituberculosis T Cell Response, JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 189, Pages: 5867-5876, ISSN: 0022-1767

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jenkins VA, Robertson BD, Williams KJ, 2012, Aspartate D48 is essential for the GlnR-mediated transcriptional response to nitrogen limitation in Mycobacterium smegmatis, FEMS MICROBIOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 330, Pages: 38-45, ISSN: 0378-1097

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Joyce G, Williams KJ, Robb M, Noens E, Tizzano B, Shahrezaei V, Robertson BDet al., 2012, Cell Division Site Placement and Asymmetric Growth in Mycobacteria, PLOS ONE, Vol: 7, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Robertson BD, Altmann D, Barry C, Bishai B, Cole S, Dick T, Duncan K, Dye C, Ehrt S, Esmail H, Flynn J, Hafner R, Handley G, Hanekom W, van Helden P, Kaplan G, Kaufmann SHE, Kim P, Lienhardt C, Mizrahi V, Rubin E, Schnappinger D, Sherman D, Thole J, Vandal O, Walzl G, Warner D, Wilkinson R, Young Det al., 2012, Detection and treatment of subclinical tuberculosis, TUBERCULOSIS, Vol: 92, Pages: 447-452, ISSN: 1472-9792

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Robertson BD, Wren B, 2012, Systems Microbiology, Publisher: Caister Academic Pr, ISBN: 9781908230027

Topics covered include mathematical models for systems biology, systems biology of Escherichia coli metabolism, bacterial chemotaxis, systems biology of infection, host-microbe interactions, phagocytosis, system-level study of metabolism in ...

BOOK

Vordermeier M, Ameni G, Berg S, Bishop R, Robertson BD, Aseffa A, Hewinson RG, Young DBet al., 2012, The influence of cattle breed on susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis in Ethiopia, COMPARATIVE IMMUNOLOGY MICROBIOLOGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Vol: 35, Pages: 227-232, ISSN: 0147-9571

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zelmer A, Carroll P, Andreu N, Hagens K, Mahlo J, Redinger N, Robertson BD, Wiles S, Ward TH, Parish T, Ripoll J, Bancroft GJ, Schaible UEet al., 2012, A new in vivo model to test anti-tuberculosis drugs using fluorescence imaging, JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMOTHERAPY, Vol: 67, Pages: 1948-1960, ISSN: 0305-7453

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Elkington P, Shiomi T, Breen R, Nuttall RK, Ugarte-Gil CA, Walker NF, Saraiva L, Pedersen B, Mauri F, Lipman M, Edwards DR, Robertson BD, D'Armiento J, Friedland JSet al., 2011, MMP-1 drives immunopathology in human tuberculosis and transgenic mice, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL INVESTIGATION, Vol: 121, Pages: 1827-1833, ISSN: 0021-9738

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hickey AJ, Misra A, Robertson BD, 2011, Optimisation of inhaled tuberculosis therapies and implications for host-pathogen interactions, TUBERCULOSIS, Vol: 91, Pages: 64-64, ISSN: 1472-9792

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Joyce G, Robertson BD, Williams KJ, 2011, A modified agar pad method for mycobacterial live-cell imaging, BMC Research Notes, Vol: 4

Background: Two general approaches to prokaryotic live-cell imaging have been employed to date, growing bacteria on thin agar pads or growing bacteria in micro-channels. The methods using agar pads 'sandwich' the cells between the agar pad on the bottom and a glass cover slip on top, before sealing the cover slip. The advantages of this technique are that it is simple and relatively inexpensive to set up. However, once the cover slip is sealed, the environmental conditions cannot be manipulated. Furthermore, desiccation of the agar pad, and the growth of cells in a sealed environment where the oxygen concentration will be in gradual decline, may not permit longer term studies such as those required for the slower growing mycobacteria. Findings. We report here a modified agar pad method where the cells are sandwiched between a cover slip on the bottom and an agar pad on top of the cover slip (rather than the reverse) and the cells viewed from below using an inverted microscope. This critical modification overcomes some of the current limitations with agar pad methods and was used to produce time-lapse images and movies of cell growth for Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Conclusions: This method offers improvement on the current agar pad methods in that long term live cell imaging studies can be performed and modification of the media during the experiment is permitted. © 2011 Williams et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Krishnan N, Malaga W, Constant P, Caws M, Tran THC, Salmons J, Nguyen TNL, Nguyen DB, Daffe M, Young DB, Robertson BD, Guilhot C, Thwaites GEet al., 2011, Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lineage Influences Innate Immune Response and Virulence and Is Associated with Distinct Cell Envelope Lipid Profiles, PLOS ONE, Vol: 6, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Williams KJ, Boshoff HI, Krishnan N, Gonzales J, Schnappinger D, Robertson BDet al., 2011, The Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-oxidation genes echA5 and fadB3 are dispensable for growth in vitro and in vivo, Tuberculosis, Vol: 91, Pages: 549-555, ISSN: 1472-9792

There are several lines of evidence pointing towards the importance of β-oxidation in host survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis including enormous gene redundancy for this process; approximately 100 genes are annotated as β-oxidation genes for the five biochemical reactions that break down fatty acids into acetyl-CoA. Although most of these genes are predicted to be non-essential, two of the genes (echA5 and fadB3) are annotated as essential for growth in vitro, and therefore could be considered as putative drug targets. However, here we report the construction of echA5 and fadB3 null mutants confirming they are non-essential. No significant difference in growth between the mutant and parent strains was observed in either standard Middlebrook medium or in minimal medium supplemented with various carbon sources. Macrophage survival and mouse infection studies also showed no significant difference between the mutant and parent strains. Therefore, we conclude that these genes are dispensable for growth in vitro and in vivo. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Williams KJ, Boshoff HI, Krishnan N, Gonzales J, Schnappinger D, Robertson BDet al., 2011, The Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-oxidation genes echA5 and fadB3 are dispensable for growth in vitro and in vivo, TUBERCULOSIS, Vol: 91, Pages: 549-555, ISSN: 1472-9792

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Andreu N, Zelmer A, Fletcher T, Elkington PT, Ward TH, Ripoll J, Parish T, Bancroft GJ, Schaible U, Robertson BD, Wiles Set al., 2010, Optimisation of Bioluminescent Reporters for Use with Mycobacteria, PLOS ONE, Vol: 5, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Carroll P, Schreuder LJ, Muwanguzi-Karugaba J, Wiles S, Robertson BD, Ripoll J, Ward TH, Bancroft GJ, Schaible UE, Parish Tet al., 2010, Sensitive Detection of Gene Expression in Mycobacteria under Replicating and Non-Replicating Conditions Using Optimized Far-Red Reporters, PLOS ONE, Vol: 5, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Krishnan N, Robertson BD, Thwaites G, 2010, The mechanisms and consequences of the extra-pulmonary dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TUBERCULOSIS, Vol: 90, Pages: 361-366, ISSN: 1472-9792

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Nisa S, Blokpoel MCJ, Robertson BD, Tyndall JDA, Lun S, Bishai WR, O'Toole Ret al., 2010, Targeting the chromosome partitioning protein ParA in tuberculosis drug discovery, JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMOTHERAPY, Vol: 65, Pages: 2347-2358, ISSN: 0305-7453

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Robertson BD, 2010, Professor DA Mitchison: 60 years of contributions to the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, TUBERCULOSIS, Vol: 90, Pages: 159-159, ISSN: 1472-9792

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Williams KJ, Joyce G, Robertson BD, 2010, Improved mycobacterial tetracycline inducible vectors, PLASMID, Vol: 64, Pages: 69-73, ISSN: 0147-619X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Berg S, Firdessa R, Habtamu M, Gadisa E, Mengistu A, Yamuah L, Ameni G, Vordermeier M, Robertson BD, Smith NH, Engers H, Young D, Hewinson RG, Aseffa A, Gordon SVet al., 2009, The Burden of Mycobacterial Disease in Ethiopian Cattle: Implications for Public Health, PLOS ONE, Vol: 4, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Berg S, Firdessa R, Habtamu M, Gadisa E, Mengistu A, Yamuah L, Ameni G, Vordermeier M, Robertson BD, Smith NH, Engers H, Young D, Hewinson RG, Aseffa A, Gordon SVet al., 2009, Correction: The Burden of Mycobacterial Disease in Ethiopian Cattle: Implications for Public Health., PLoS ONE, Vol: 4, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Marquina-Castillo B, Garcia-Garcia L, Ponce-de-Leon A, Jimenez-Corona M-E, Bobadilla-del Valle M, Cano-Arellano B, Canizales-Quintero S, Martinez-Gamboa A, Kato-Maeda M, Robertson B, Young D, Small P, Schoolnik G, Sifuentes-Osornio J, Hernandez-Pando Ret al., 2009, Virulence, immunopathology and transmissibility of selected strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a murine model, IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 128, Pages: 123-133, ISSN: 0019-2805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wiles S, Robertson BD, Frankel G, Kerton Aet al., 2009, Bioluminescent monitoring of in vivo colonization and clearance dynamics by light-emitting bacteria., Methods Mol Biol, Vol: 574, Pages: 137-153

Bioluminescence is an excellent reporter system for analysing bacterial colonization and clearance dynamics in vivo. Many bacterial species have been rendered bioluminescent, allowing the sensitive detection of bacterial burden and metabolic activity in real-time and in situ in living animals. In this chapter we describe the protocols for characterizing in vivo infection models using bioluminescent bacteria: from real-time imaging in living animals by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to ex vivo BLI of harvested organs and tissues and, finally, to quantification of bacterial numbers in organ and tissue homogenates by luminometry and viable counts. While the lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens is ideally suited for use in such models, there may be times when alternative luciferases, such as those from the firefly (luc) or marine copepods (Gluc), may be more appropriate. Here we describe the protocols required to monitor colonization and clearance dynamics using bioluminescent bacteria that are lux-, luc-, or Gluc-positive.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Martinez-Gamboa A, Ponce-de-Leon A, Galindo-Fraga A, Bobadilla-del-Valle M, Kato-Maeda M, Robertson BD, Young DB, Small PM, Sifuentes-Osornio Jet al., 2008, Molecular Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains with an Intact pks15/1 Gene in a Rural Community of Mexico, ARCHIVES OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, Vol: 39, Pages: 809-814, ISSN: 0188-4409

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Stumpf MP, Robertson BD, Duncan K, Young DBet al., 2007, Systems biology and its impact on anti-infective drug development., Prog Drug Res, Vol: 64, Pages: 1-20, ISSN: 0071-786X

Systems biology offers the potential for more effective selection of novel targets for anti-infective drugs. In contrast to conventional reductionist biology, a systems approach allows targets to be viewed in a wider context of the entire physiology of the cell, with the potential to identify key susceptible nodes and to predict synergistic effects of blocking multiple pathways. In addition to the holistic perspective provided by systems biology, the emphasis on quantitative analysis is likely to add further rigour to the process of target selection. Systems biology also offers the potential to incorporate different levels of information into the selection process. Consideration of data from microbial population biology may be important in the context of predicting future drug-resistance profiles associated with targeting a particular pathway, for example. This chapter provides an overview of major themes in the developing field of systems biology, summarising the core technologies and the strategies used to translate datasets into useful quantitative models capable of predicting complex biological behaviour.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Thanky NR, Young DB, Robertson BD, 2007, Unusual features of the cell cycle in mycobacteria: Polar-restricted growth and the snapping-model of cell division, TUBERCULOSIS, Vol: 87, Pages: 231-236, ISSN: 1472-9792

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Stadthagen G, Jackson M, Charles P, Boudou F, Barilone N, Huerre M, Constant P, Liav A, Bottova I, Nigou J, Brando T, Puzo G, Daffe M, Benjamin P, Coade S, Buxton RS, Tascon RE, Rae A, Robertson BD, Lowrie DB, Young DB, Gicquel B, Griffin Ret al., 2006, Comparative investigation of the pathogenicity of three Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants defective in the synthesis of p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives, MICROBES AND INFECTION, Vol: 8, Pages: 2245-2253, ISSN: 1286-4579

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wiles S, Hanage WP, Frankel G, Robertson Bet al., 2006, Modelling infectious disease - time to think outside the box?, NATURE REVIEWS MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 4, Pages: 307-312, ISSN: 1740-1526

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Blokpoel MCJ, Murphy HN, O'Toole R, Wiles S, Runn ESC, Stewart GR, Young DB, Robertson BDet al., 2005, Tetracycline-inducible gene regulation in mycobacteria, NUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH, Vol: 33, ISSN: 0305-1048

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Murphy HN, Stewart GR, Mischenko VV, Apt AS, Harris R, McAlister MSB, Driscoll PC, Young DB, Robertson BDet al., 2005, The OtsAB pathway is essential for trehalose biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 280, Pages: 14524-14529, ISSN: 0021-9258

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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