Imperial College London

DrBrianRobertson

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Reader in Systems Microbiology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3198b.robertson

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Sophie Kemp +44 (0)20 7594 3199

 
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Location

 

3.41Flowers buildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Williams:2015:10.1111/mmi.13091,
author = {Williams, KJ and Jenkins, VA and Barton, GR and Bryant, WA and Krishnan, N and Robertson, BD},
doi = {10.1111/mmi.13091},
journal = {Molecular Microbiology},
pages = {1142--1157},
title = {Deciphering the metabolic response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to nitrogen stress.},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mmi.13091},
volume = {97},
year = {2015}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - A key component to the success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen is the ability to sense and adapt metabolically to the diverse range of conditions encountered in vivo, such as oxygen tension, environmental pH and nutrient availability. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for every organism, little is known about the genes and pathways responsible for nitrogen assimilation in M. tuberculosis. In this study we have used transcriptomics and ChIP-seq to address this. In response to nitrogen starvation a total of 185 genes were significantly differentially expressed (96 up-regulated and 89 down regulated; 5% genome) highlighting several significant areas of metabolic change during nitrogen limitation such as nitrate/nitrite metabolism, aspartate metabolism and changes in cell wall biosynthesis. We identify GlnR as a regulator involved in the nitrogen response, controlling the expression of at least 33 genes in response to nitrogen limitation. We identify a consensus GlnR binding site and relate its location to known transcriptional start sites. We also show that the GlnR response regulator plays a very different role in M. tuberculosis to that in non-pathogenic mycobacteria, controlling genes involved in nitric oxide detoxification and intracellular survival instead of genes involved in nitrogen scavenging.
AU - Williams,KJ
AU - Jenkins,VA
AU - Barton,GR
AU - Bryant,WA
AU - Krishnan,N
AU - Robertson,BD
DO - 10.1111/mmi.13091
EP - 1157
PY - 2015///
SN - 1365-2958
SP - 1142
TI - Deciphering the metabolic response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to nitrogen stress.
T2 - Molecular Microbiology
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mmi.13091
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/24514
VL - 97
ER -