Imperial College London

DrBarrySeemungal

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3311 7042b.seemungal

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Lorna Stevenson +44 (0)20 3313 5525

 
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Location

 

10L17Lab BlockCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Sargeant:2018:10.1177/2059700218808121,
author = {Sargeant, M and Sykes, E and Saviour, M and Sawhney, A and Calzolari, E and Arthur, J and McGoldrick, A and Seemungal, BM},
doi = {10.1177/2059700218808121},
journal = {Journal of Concussion},
title = {The utility of the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool in hospitalized traumatic brain injury patients},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2059700218808121},
volume = {2},
year = {2018}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - The Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version is a sports screening tool that is often used to support return to play decisions following a head injury. The Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version is presumed to identify brain dysfunction (implying a degree of brain injury); however, the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool has never been validated with patients with definite acute brain injury. In this study, we found that all three Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version domains – symptoms, cognitive and balance assessments – were sensitive in discriminating traumatic brain injury patients (all with abnormal acute neuroimaging) from healthy controls. Through a correlation matrix (Bonferroni corrected), we found no correlation between the subjective (symptoms) and objective (examination) Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version assessments, e.g. complaints of imbalance and memory dysfunction were not correlated, respectively, with performance on testing balance and memory function. When relaxing the correction for multiple comparisons we found that of all Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version symptoms, a feeling of ‘pressure in the head’ had the largest number of co-correlations (including affective symptoms) and overwhelmingly in a pattern indicative of migraine. Taken together, that objective and subjective assessments in the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version are poorly correlated, could suggest that symptoms in the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3rd version poorly reflect brain injury but rather indicate non-brain injury processes such as migraine. It follows that the current prominent orthodoxy of resting athletes following a head injury until their symptoms settle for fear of exacerbating brain injury may be unfavourable for their recovery – at least in some cases. Prospective clinical studies would be required to assess patient recovery from concussion with early active investigation and t
AU - Sargeant,M
AU - Sykes,E
AU - Saviour,M
AU - Sawhney,A
AU - Calzolari,E
AU - Arthur,J
AU - McGoldrick,A
AU - Seemungal,BM
DO - 10.1177/2059700218808121
PY - 2018///
SN - 2059-7002
TI - The utility of the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool in hospitalized traumatic brain injury patients
T2 - Journal of Concussion
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2059700218808121
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/65056
VL - 2
ER -