Imperial College London

Dr Calliope Panoutsou

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Senior Research Fellow
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

c.panoutsou Website

 
 
//

Location

 

304Weeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

28 results found

Panoutsou C, Singh A, A value chain approach to improve biomass policy formation, GCB Bioenergy, ISSN: 1757-1693

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Singh A, Christensen T, Competitive priorities to address optimisation in biomass value chains: the case of biomass CHP, Managing Global Transitions: International Research Journal, ISSN: 2589-7918

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Alexopoulou E, 2020, Costs and profitability of crops for bioeconomy in the EU, Energies MDPI, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-27, ISSN: 1996-1073

The bioeconomy is the cornerstone of the EU’s policy for shifting economic and societal trends towards circularity and low carbon arrangements. Europe has several crops that can be used as raw materials for this purpose, however pressure on land which might displace other activities and industrial competition for cost efficient raw materials remains a challenge. Hence, ensuring good yielding capacity and examining the likelihood to produce more by exploiting low quality, unused land can present significant opportunities to increase sustainable, locally sourced supply and at the same time offer profitable solutions to both industry and the farmers. This paper estimates the production costs of fourteen crops (oil, sugar, starch and lignocellulosic) and analyses how their profitability can be influenced by yield increases and cultivation in low quality land. Results show that there are profitable options for all crops under current market prices and land types except for cases in countries where crop productivity is rather low to sustain farm incomes. The analysis confirms that Europe has plenty crop options as raw materials for bioeconomy. Decision makers however must ensure future research and policy support are oriented towards sustainable yield increases and accelerate rehabilitation of land that is unused and of low quality.

Journal article

Chiaramonti D, Panoutsou C, 2019, Policy measures for sustainable sunflower cropping in EU-MED marginal lands amended by biochar: case study in Tuscany, Italy, Biomass and Bioenergy, Vol: 126, Pages: 199-210, ISSN: 0961-9534

The aim of this study is to evaluate economic support measures based on current EU policies affecting the profitability of large-scale deployment of biochar for sunflower cultivation in dry marginal lands in Italy, paving the way to large scale carbon sequestration in the EU Mediterranean region. Two cases were considered: i) straight biochar use and ii) biochar in combination with compost (COMBI: 20% biochar and 80% compost mass fraction), at application rates of 5 and 10 Mg ha−1 respectively. Based on realistic estimations of achievable crop-yield performances by biochar and COMBI addition to dry soils, the effect of current policies on the economic viability of biochar deployment and farmers’ income has been investigated. Using a cost-model we identified the required levels of support, in the form of (i) area subsidies for crop cultivation, (ii) tradable carbon certificates (credits), and (iii) REDII-compliant biofuel support for Aviation and Maritime, so to make biochar and sunflower cultivation in EU MED dry marginal lands competitive for sustainable crop-based biofuels. Results show that, by employing existing policy instruments, sufficient income can be generated for famers to recover marginal land, sequester large amount of carbon by BECCS at costs (∼82 € Mg−1 of CO2) falling at or below the typical range of CCS measures, as well as offer additional environmental and socio-economic positive benefits. The combination of currently operational economic mechanisms from the Common Agricultural Policy, the Climate Policy, and the Renewable Energy Directive II can: i) maintain domestic farming activities, ii) support the implementation of biochar projects at local level, iii) contribute to achieve EU and national biofuel targets without generating ILUC impacts and iv) achieve unprecedent potential for carbon sequestration. However, prior to large-scale deployment, targeted on-site R&D actions aimed at validating biochar effects under

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Fernando AL, Soldatos P, Rettenmaier Net al., 2018, Sustainability of Perennial Crops Production for Bioenergy and Bioproducts, Perennial Grasses for Bioenergy and Bioproducts Production, Uses, Sustainability and Markets for Giant Reed, Miscanthus, Switchgrass, Reed Canary Grass and Bamboo, Editors: Alexopoulou, Publisher: Academic Press, ISBN: 9780128129005

The book covers their breeding, cultivation, harvesting, pre-treatment, economics and characterization. The book goes on to present the thermochemical conversion pathways for different types of feedstock.

Book chapter

Panoutsou C, 2018, Modelling and optimization of Biomass supply chains. 2018. Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-12-812303-4, Publisher: Elsevier, ISBN: 978-0-12-812303-4

Modelling and Optimisation of Biomass Supply Chains provides scientific evidence for assessing biomass supply and logistics, placing emphasis on the methods, modelling capacities and large data collection, processing, storage and update. The information presented builds on recent relevant research work from the Biomass Futures, Biomass Policies and S2Biom projects. In addition to technical issues, it covers economic, social, and environmental aspects with direct implications on biomass availability.Its chapters offer an overview of methodologies for assessing and modelling supply, biomass quality and requirements for different conversion processes, logistics and demand for biobased sectors. Case studies from the projects that inspire the book present practical examples of the implementation of these methodologies. The authors also compare methodologies for different regions, like Europe and the US. Biomass feedstock-specific chapters address the relevant elements for forest, agriculture, biowastes, post-consumer wood and non-food crops. Engineers in the bioenergy sector, as well as researchers and graduate students will find in this book a very useful resource when working on optimization and modelling of biomass supply chains. For energy policy makers, analysts and consultants, the book provides consistent and technically sound projections for policy and market development decisions.

Book

Panoutsou C, 2018, Biomass supply and logistics in both top down and bottom up assessments, Modelling and optimization of Biomass supply chains, Editors: Panoutsou, ISBN: 978-0-12-812303-4

The aim of the article is to set the scene on methodologies and recent work for biomass supply and logistics assessments. Although the focus is primarily work that has been performed in Europe, references to similar work in other regions, e.g US are included.

Book chapter

Panoutsou C, 2018, Assessing agricultural biomass potentials, Modelling and optimization of Biomass supply chains., Editors: Panoutsou, Publisher: Elsevier, ISBN: 978-0-12-812303-4

The aim of this chapter is to present the methodology, assumptions and relevant indicators for assessing cost supply and logistics in the field of agricultural biomass. Detailed information on the use of data sources, methods and how to establish and maintain biomass databases​ are also included.

Book chapter

Panoutsou C, 2016, The role of sustainable biomass in the heat market sector for EU27, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews Energy and Environment, Vol: 5, Pages: 430-450, ISSN: 2041-8396

This paper provides evidence-based information for biomass heat as a low-carbon option to meet the renewable energy targets in the European Union by employing both qualitative and quantitative frameworks in order to (1) characterize market segments within the heat, district heating, and combined heat and power (CHP) sectors in EU27; (2) define a set of key factors affecting future penetration of biomass in them; (3) evaluate the market segments across all the key factors and define which are the most promising for biomass uptake by 2020; and (4) assess the quantitative role that biomass can play in the various market segments for 2020. The demand analysis is combined with detailed cost supply information for a range of scenarios, from individual National Renewable Energy Action Plans (NREAPs) country information to explicit, consistent, and harmonized datasets for all EU Member States which also comply with two sets of sustainability criteria, one reflecting the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) and the other applying very strict mitigation factors to the biomass value chains and also expanding the RED criteria to all bioenergy carriers (liquid, solid, and gaseous).

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Bauen A, Duffield J, 2013, Policy regimes and funding schemes to support investment for next-generation biofuels in the USA and the EU-27, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 7, Pages: 685-701, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Bauen A, Boettcher H, Alexopoulou E, Fritsche U, Uslu A, van Stralen JNP, Elbersen B, Kretschmer B, Capros P, Maniatis Ket al., 2013, Biomass Futures: an integrated approach for estimating the future contribution of biomass value chains to the European energy system and inform future policy formation, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 7, Pages: 106-114, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

van Stralen JNP, Uslu A, Dalla Longa F, Panoutsou Cet al., 2013, The role of biomass in heat, electricity, and transport markets in the EU27 under different scenarios, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 7, Pages: 147-163, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Uslu A, van Stralen J, Elbersen B, Panoutsou C, Fritsche U, Boettcher Het al., 2013, Bioenergy scenarios that contribute to a sustainable energy future in the EU27, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 7, Pages: 164-172, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Keegan D, Kretschmer B, Elbersen B, Panoutsou Cet al., 2013, Cascading use: a systematic approach to biomass beyond the energy sector, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 7, Pages: 193-206, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Maniatis K, 2013, Biomass futures: Estimating the role of sustainable biomass for meeting the 2020 targets and beyond, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 7, Pages: 97-98, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Soldatos P, Lychnaras V, Panoutsou C, Cosentino SLet al., 2010, Economic viability of energy crops in the EU: the farmer's point of view, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 4, Pages: 637-657, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Christou M, Alexopoulou E, Panoutsou C, Monti Aet al., 2010, Overview of the markets for energy crops in EU27, BIOFUELS BIOPRODUCTS & BIOREFINING-BIOFPR, Vol: 4, Pages: 605-619, ISSN: 1932-104X

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Slade R, 2010, Biofuels in the UK: a case study of current and emerging feedstocks, Journal of Biobased Materials and Bioenergy, Vol: 4, Pages: 1-13

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Eleftheriadis J, Nikolaou A, 2009, Biomass supply in EU27 from 2010 to 2030, ENERGY POLICY, Vol: 37, Pages: 5675-5686, ISSN: 0301-4215

Journal article

Slade R, Panoutsou C, Bauen A, 2009, Reconciling bio-energy policy and delivery in the UK: Will UK policy initiatives lead to increased deployment?, BIOMASS & BIOENERGY, Vol: 33, Pages: 679-688, ISSN: 0961-9534

Journal article

Alexopoulou E, Sharma N, Papatheohari Y, Christou M, Piscioneri I, Panoutsou C, Pignatelli Vet al., 2008, Biomass yields for upland and lowland switchgrass varieties grown in the Mediterranean region, Biomass and Bioenergy (In Press), ISSN: 0961-9534

Switchgrass has been proposed as a perennial plant suitable for biofuel production. Cultivar selection has a major impact on the ultimate productivity, persistence and profitability of the crop. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 16 switchgrass varieties (upland and lowland ones) for 5 years in Greece and Italy. One single winter harvest was carried out every year when the moisture content was less than 20% and biomass yields were determined. At the end of each growing season, the stem height and the number of tillers per square meter were measured. It was found that all varieties performed high yields in both sites except for the varieties 9005439 (upland) and 9005438 (lowland), which produced only 5.6 and 6.9 t ha−1, respectively. All varieties produced their best yields in the third growing season, 17.9 t ha−1 in Greece and 12.3 t ha−1 in Italy. Significantly higher mean yields were recorded in the Greek trial, apart from the lowland variety SL 93-3 that produced 20.8 t ha−1 in Italy and 18.1 t ha−1 in Greece. The lowland varieties (Cathage, Kanlow, SL 93-2 and SL 93-3) were found to be more productive compared to the upland varieties, averaged over the sites and the years. The best performing variety on every site (mean 1999–2002) was a lowland variety, Kanlow (17.1 t ha−1) in Greece and SL 93-3 (20 t ha−1) in Italy.

Journal article

Panoutsou C, 2008, Bioenergy in Greece: Policies, diffusion framework and stakeholder interactions, Energy Policy (accepted), ISSN: 0301-4215

The paper provides a high level scene setting analysis to understand the policy and legislative framework in which the diffusion of bioenergy takes place in Greece and local level analysis of the perceptions of the key stakeholders within the local community of Rodopi, in the northern part of the country. It is divided into six sections. Firstly the framework conditions for biomass heat and electricity generation in Greece are presented. In the second section the policy context is set in order to identify the key support mechanisms for bioenergy in the country. The third section presents an outline of the diffusion of bioenergy in terms of key groups involved as well as key factors affecting the planning and implementation of a bioenergy scheme at local/ regional and national levels. The fourth section reviews the perception of key stakeholders towards bioenergy/biofuels schemes at national level based on national networks. The fifth section focuses on a case study region (Rodopi, northern Greece) and provides an in- depth analysis for the perception of the main local actors (farmers and end users) based on structured questionnaire interviews. The final section provides the main conclusions from the surveys and draws a set of recommendations for the integration of bioenergy schemes into the Greek energy system.

Journal article

Jablonski S, Bauen A, Pantaleo M, Panoutsou C, Slade R, Pearson Pet al., 2008, Assessment of the potential bioenergy demand for heat in the UK: an approach based on market segmentation., Biomass and Bioenergy, Vol: 32, Pages: 635-653, ISSN: 0961-9534

How large is the potential demand for bio-heat in the UK? Whilst most research has focused on the supply of biomass for energy production, an understanding of the potential demand is crucial to the uptake of heat from bioenergy. We have designed a systematic framework utilising market segmentation techniques to assess the potential demand for biomass heat in the UK. First, the heat market is divided into relevant segments, characterised in terms of their final energy consumption, technological and fuel supply options. Second, the key technical, economic and organisational factors that affect the uptake of bioenergy in each heat segment are identified, classified and then analysed to reveal which could be strong barriers, which could be surmounted easily, and for which bioenergy heat represents an improvement compared to alternatives. The defined framework is applied to the UK residential sector. We identify provisionally the most promising market segments for bioenergy heat, and their current levels of energy demand. We find that, depending on the assumptions, the present potential demand for bio-heat in the UK residential sector ranges between 3% (conservative estimate) and 31% (optimistic estimate) of the total energy consumed in the heat market.

Journal article

Jablonski S, Pateleoa A, Bauen A, Pearson P, Slade Ret al., 2008, The potential demand for bioenergy in residential heating applications (bio-heat) in the UK based on a market segment analysis, Biomass and Bioenergy, Vol: 32, Pages: 635-653

How large is the potential demand for bio-heat in the UK? Whilst most research has focused on the supply of biomass for energy production, an understanding of the potential demand is crucial to the uptake of heat from bioenergy. We have designed a systematic framework utilising market segmentation techniques to assess the potential demand for biomass heat in the UK. First, the heat market is divided into relevant segments, characterised in terms of their final energy consumption, technological and fuel supply options. Second, the key technical, economic and organisational factors that affect the uptake of bioenergy in each heat segment are identified, classified and then analysed to reveal which could be strong barriers, which could be surmounted easily, and for which bioenergy heat represents an improvement compared to alternatives. The defined framework is applied to the UK residential sector. We identify provisionally the most promising market segments for bioenergy heat, and their current levels of energy demand. We find that, depending on the assumptions, the present potential demand for bio-heat in the UK residential sector ranges between 3% (conservative estimate) and 31% (optimistic estimate) of the total energy consumed in the heat market.

Journal article

Panoutsou C, Namatov I, Lychnaras V, Nikolaou Aet al., 2008, Biodiesel options in Greece, Biomass and Bioenergy, Vol: 32, Pages: 473-481, ISSN: 0961-9534

Following European Directive (2003/30/EC) on the promotion of the use of biofuels or other renewable fuels for transport dated May 2003, the Greek Government recently conducted a study on biofuels in Greece as part of the National report for the Directive. According to this, biodiesel will be the main biofuel for the Greek transport sector with bioethanol playing a much more minor role. The amount of biodiesel required to satisfy the indicative target of 2% (on a lower calorific basis) for the year 2005 is estimated to be ca. 42,560 tonnes, while the amount to satisfy the indicative target of 5.75% for the year 2010 is estimated to be ca. 135,585 tonnes. This paper will analyse the resources available for biodiesel production and identify the most realistic options under technical, economic and environmental perspectives.

Journal article

Panoutsou C, 2007, Socio-economic impacts of energy crops for heat generation in Northern Greece, Energy Policy, Vol: 35, Pages: 6046-6059, ISSN: 0301-4215

Bioenergy is considered to be an attractive option mainly due to driving forces of an environmental nature (e.g. climate change and sustainability issues). This is particularly the case for energy crops, which show higher productivity per land unit than their conventional counterparts. In addition, by comparison, such crops are more homogeneous in terms of their physical and chemical characteristics than residual resources that are often described as the biomass resource of the future. However, despite the long-term research and the considerable efforts to promote them, implementation is still rather slow across Europe. In this paper, two perennial energy crops, cardoon and giant reed, are evaluated in Rodopi, northern Greece, as alternative land use, through comparative financial appraisal with the main conventional crops. Based on the output of this analysis, the breakeven for the two energy crops is defined and an economic and socio-economic evaluation of a biomass district heating system is conducted. Results prove that energy crops can be attractive alternatives if they are properly integrated into existing agricultural activities and complement the current cropping options. As such, they provide raw material for local heat applications, thus resulting in increased income for the region and an increase in the number of jobs.

Journal article

Elghali L, Clift R, Sinclair P, Panoutsou C, Bauen Aet al., 2007, Developing a Sustainability Framework for the Assessment of Bioenergy Systems, Energy Policy, Vol: 35, Pages: 6075-6083, ISSN: 0301-4215

The potential for biomass to contribute to energy supply in a low-carbon economy is well recognised. However, for the sector to contribute fully to sustainable development in the UK, specific exploitation routes must meet the three sets of criteria usually recognised as representing the tests for sustainability: economic viability in the market and fiscal framework within which the supply chain operates; environmental performance, including, but not limited to, low carbon dioxide emissions over the complete fuel cycle; and social acceptability, with the benefits of using biomass recognised as outweighing any negative social impacts. This paper describes an approach to developing a methodology to establish a sustainability framework for the assessment of bioenergy systems to provide practical advice for policy makers, planners and the bioenergy industry, and thus to support policy development and bioenergy deployment at different scales. The approach uses multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and decision-conferencing, to explore how such a process is able to integrate and reconcile the interests and concerns of diverse stakeholder groups.

Journal article

Mardikis M, Nikolaou A, Djouras N, Panoutsou Cet al., 2004, Agricultural biomass in Greece, Publisher: OECD publications, ISBN: 926410-555-7

Book

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00488035&limit=30&person=true