Imperial College London

Professor Iain Colin Prentice

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Chair in Biosphere and Climate Impacts
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2354c.prentice

 
 
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Location

 

1.1Centre for Population BiologySilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

351 results found

WERGER MJA, PRENTICE IC, HELSPER HPH, 1985, THE EFFECT OF SOD-CUTTING TO DIFFERENT DEPTHS ON CALLUNA HEATHLAND REGENERATION, JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Vol: 20, Pages: 181-188, ISSN: 0301-4797

Journal article

VANTONGEREN OFR, PRENTICE IC, DESMIDT JT, 1985, TOWARDS A HEATHLAND SUCCESSION MODEL, ACTA BOTANICA NEERLANDICA, Vol: 34, Pages: 224-224, ISSN: 0044-5983

Journal article

OVERPECK JT, WEBB T, PRENTICE IC, 1985, QUANTITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF FOSSIL POLLEN SPECTRA - DISSIMILARITY COEFFICIENTS AND THE METHOD OF MODERN ANALOGS, QUATERNARY RESEARCH, Vol: 23, Pages: 87-108, ISSN: 0033-5894

Journal article

PARSONS RW, GORDON AD, PRENTICE IC, 1983, STATISTICAL UNCERTAINTY IN FOREST COMPOSITION ESTIMATES OBTAINED FROM FOSSIL POLLEN SPECTRA VIA THE R-VALUE MODEL, REVIEW OF PALAEOBOTANY AND PALYNOLOGY, Vol: 40, Pages: 177-189, ISSN: 0034-6667

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1983, POLLEN MAPPING OF REGIONAL VEGETATION PATTERNS IN SOUTH AND CENTRAL SWEDEN, JOURNAL OF BIOGEOGRAPHY, Vol: 10, Pages: 441-454, ISSN: 0305-0270

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, PARSONS RW, 1983, MAXIMUM-LIKELIHOOD LINEAR CALIBRATION OF POLLEN SPECTRA IN TERMS OF FOREST COMPOSITION, BIOMETRICS, Vol: 39, Pages: 1051-1057, ISSN: 0006-341X

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1983, POST-GLACIAL CLIMATIC-CHANGE - VEGETATION DYNAMICS AND THE POLLEN RECORD, PROGRESS IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, Vol: 7, Pages: 273-286, ISSN: 0309-1333

Journal article

Prentice IC, 1982, Calibration of pollen spectra in terms of species abundance., Palaeohydrological changes in the temperate zone in the last 15 000 years. IGCP 158 B. Lake and mire environments. Project guide III, Pages: 25-51

Describes calibration techniques which make it possible to translate pollen spectra (relative or absolute) into quantitative estimates of plant taxon abundances. Covers the methodology of surface sample surveys, the empirical methods used to derive correction coefficients from surface pollen and quantitative vegetation data, and the reconstruction of past vegetation. -K.Clayton

Journal article

Prentice IC, 1982, Multivariate methods for the presentation and analysis of data., Palaeohydrological changes in the temperate zone in the last 15 000 years. IGCP 158 B. Lake and mire environments. Project guide III, Pages: 53-77

A general review of statistical techniques including cluster analysis, principal components analysis and canonical analysis. These techniques are used with examples of pollen data. -K.Clayton

Journal article

PARSONS RW, PRENTICE IC, 1981, STATISTICAL APPROACHES TO R-VALUES AND THE POLLEN-VEGETATION RELATIONSHIP, REVIEW OF PALAEOBOTANY AND PALYNOLOGY, Vol: 32, Pages: 127-152, ISSN: 0034-6667

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1981, QUANTITATIVE BIRCH (BETULA L) POLLEN SEPARATION BY ANALYSIS OF SIZE FREQUENCY DATA, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 89, Pages: 145-157, ISSN: 0028-646X

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1980, VEGETATION ANALYSIS AND ORDER INVARIANT GRADIENT MODELS, VEGETATIO, Vol: 42, Pages: 27-34, ISSN: 0042-3106

Journal article

PARSONS RW, PRENTICE IC, SAARNISTO M, 1980, STATISTICAL STUDIES ON POLLEN REPRESENTATION IN FINNISH LAKE-SEDIMENTS IN RELATION TO FOREST INVENTORY DATA, ANNALES BOTANICI FENNICI, Vol: 17, Pages: 379-393, ISSN: 0003-3847

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1980, MULTIDIMENSIONAL-SCALING AS A RESEARCH TOOL IN QUATERNARY PALYNOLOGY - A REVIEW OF THEORY AND METHODS, REVIEW OF PALAEOBOTANY AND PALYNOLOGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 71-104, ISSN: 0034-6667

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1978, MODERN POLLEN SPECTRA FROM LAKE-SEDIMENTS IN FINLAND AND FINNMARK, NORTH NORWAY, BOREAS, Vol: 7, Pages: 131-153, ISSN: 0300-9483

Journal article

PRENTICE IC, 1977, NONMETRIC ORDINATION METHODS IN ECOLOGY, JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY, Vol: 65, Pages: 85-94, ISSN: 0022-0477

Journal article

GORDON AD, PRENTICE IC, 1977, NUMERICAL-METHODS IN QUATERNARY PALEOECOLOGY .4. SEPARATING MIXTURES OF MORPHOLOGICALLY SIMILAR POLLEN TAXA, REVIEW OF PALAEOBOTANY AND PALYNOLOGY, Vol: 23, Pages: 359-372, ISSN: 0034-6667

Journal article

Adam P, Birks HJB, Huntley B, Prentice ICet al., 1975, Phytosociological studies at malham tarn moss and fen, Yorkshire, England, Vegetatio, Vol: 30, Pages: 117-132, ISSN: 0042-3106

During a field course the vegetation of the extensive mire complex on the west side of Malham Tarn was examined. 84 relevés were collected, with 210 taxa in total. This data set has been 'structured' by classical phytosociological techniques. It is suggested that it approaches the maximum size of data-set which can be handled in this way, especially if the data are not all collected by one person. Ordination of the quadrats was carried out but gave little insight into the data despite the use of non-centred as well as centred principal components analysis. Numerical classification of the quadrats using minimumvariance cluster analysis was shown to produce a structure interpretable in ecological terms. A classification of the taxa was carried out by the same method and a 'rearranged' table was drawn up using the results of the two classifications. A relocation technique was applied at an appropriate cluster level but little was felt to be gained from this. The use of 'two-way' minimum-variance cluster analysis for the rapid production of re-arranged tables is recommended for large data-sets. In addition the vegetational units recognised in the data are described and discussed. © 1975 Dr. W. Junk b.v. Publishers.

Journal article

PRENTICE HC, PRENTICE IC, 1975, HILL VEGETATION OF NORTH-HOY, ORKNEY, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 75, Pages: 313-367, ISSN: 0028-646X

Journal article

Lavergne A, Graven H, Prentice IC, Disentangling the relative contributions of atmospheric demand for water and soil water availability on the stomatal limitation of photosynthesis

<jats:p> &amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Plants open and close their stomata in response to changes in the environment, so they can absorb the CO&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;2&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt; they need to grow, while also avoid drying out. Since the activities of leaf stomata determine the exchanges of carbon and water between the vegetation and the atmosphere, it is crucial to incorporate their responses to environmental pressure into the vegetation models predicting carbon and water fluxes on broad spatial and temporal scales. The least-cost optimality theory proposes a simple way to predict leaf behaviour, in particular changes in the ratio of leaf internal (&amp;lt;em&amp;gt;c&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;i&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;) to ambient (&amp;lt;em&amp;gt;c&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;a&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;) partial pressure of CO&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;2&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;, from four environmental variables, i.e. &amp;lt;em&amp;gt;c&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;a&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;, growing-season temperature (&amp;lt;em&amp;gt;T&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;g&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;), atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (&amp;lt;em&amp;gt;D&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;g&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;), and atmospheric pressure (as indexed by elevation, &amp;lt;em&amp;gt;z&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;). However, even though the theory considers the effect of atmospheric demand for water on &amp;lt;em&amp;gt;c&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;i&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;/&amp;lt;em&amp;gt;c&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt;&amp;lt;sub&amp;gt;a&amp;lt;/sub&amp;gt;, it does not predict how dry soils with reduced soil water availability further influence &amp;lt;em&amp;gt;c&amp;lt;/em&

Journal article

Joos F, Spahni R, Stocker BD, Lienert S, Müller J, Fischer H, Schmitt J, Prentice IC, Otto-Bliesner B, Liu Zet al., N&lt;sub&gt;2&lt;/sub&gt;O changes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the preindustrial – Part II: Terrestrial N&lt;sub&gt;2&lt;/sub&gt;O emissions constrain carbon-nitrogen interactions

<jats:p>Abstract. Land ecosystems currently take up a quarter of the human-caused carbon dioxide emissions. Future projections of this carbon sink are strikingly divergent, leading to major uncertainties in projected global warming. This situation partly reflects our insufficient understanding of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) interactions and particularly of the controls on biological N fixation (BNF). It is difficult to infer ecosystem responses for century time scales, relevant for global warming, from the comparatively short instrumental records and laboratory or field experiments. Here we analyse terrestrial emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) over the past 21,000 years as reconstructed from ice-core isotopic data and presented in part I of this study. Changing N2O emissions are interpreted to reflect changes in ecosystem N loss, plant available N, and BNF. The ice-core data reveal a 40 % increase in N2O emissions over the deglaciation, suggestive of a highly dynamic global N cycle whereby sources of plant-available N adjust to meet plant N demand and loss fluxes. Remarkably, the increase occurred in two steps, each realized within maximum two centuries, at the onsets of the northern hemisphere warming events around 14,600 and 11,700 years ago. We applied the LPX-Bern dynamic global vegetation model in deglacial simulations forced with Earth System Model climate data to investigate N2O emission patterns, mechanisms, and C-N coupling. The reconstructed increase in terrestrial emissions is broadly reproduced by the model, given the assumption that BNF positively responds to increasing N demand by plants. In contrast, assuming time- and demand-independent levels of BNF in the model to mimic progressive N limitation of plant growth results in N2O emissions that are incompatible with the reconstruction. Our results suggest the existence of (a) strong biological controls on ecosystem N acquisition, and (b) flexibility in the coupling of the C and N cycles during per

Journal article

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