Imperial College London

Professor Iain Colin Prentice

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Chair in Biosphere and Climate Impacts
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2354c.prentice

 
 
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Location

 

1.1Centre for Population BiologySilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

351 results found

Marlon JR, Bartlein PJ, Carcaillet C, Gavin DG, Harrison SP, Higuera PE, Joos F, Power MJ, Prentice ICet al., 2008, Climate and human influences on global biomass burning over the past two millennia, NATURE GEOSCIENCE, Vol: 1, Pages: 697-702, ISSN: 1752-0894

Journal article

Sitch S, Huntingford C, Gedney N, Levy PE, Lomas M, Piao SL, Betts R, Ciais P, Cox P, Friedlingstein P, Jones CD, Prentice IC, Woodward FIet al., 2008, Evaluation of the terrestrial carbon cycle, future plant geography and climate-carbon cycle feedbacks using five Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs), GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, Vol: 14, Pages: 2015-2039, ISSN: 1354-1013

Journal article

Xu-Ri, Prentice IC, 2008, Terrestrial nitrogen cycle simulation with a dynamic global vegetation model, GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, Vol: 14, Pages: 1745-1764, ISSN: 1354-1013

Journal article

Hickler T, Smith B, Prentice IC, Mjofors K, Miller P, Arneth A, Sykes MTet al., 2008, CO2 fertilization in temperate FACE experiments not representative of boreal and tropical forests, GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, Vol: 14, Pages: 1531-1542, ISSN: 1354-1013

Journal article

Power MJ, Marlon J, Ortiz N, Bartlein PJ, Harrison SP, Mayle FE, Ballouche A, Bradshaw RHW, Carcaillet C, Cordova C, Mooney S, Moreno PI, Prentice IC, Thonicke K, Tinner W, Whitlock C, Zhang Y, Zhao Y, Ali AA, Anderson RS, Beer R, Behling H, Briles C, Brown KJ, Brunelle A, Bush M, Camill P, Chu GQ, Clark J, Colombaroli D, Connor S, Daniau A-L, Daniels M, Dodson J, Doughty E, Edwards ME, Finsinger W, Foster D, Frechette J, Gaillard M-J, Gavin DG, Gobet E, Haberle S, Hallett DJ, Higuera P, Hope G, Horn S, Inoue J, Kaltenrieder P, Kennedy L, Kong ZC, Larsen C, Long CJ, Lynch J, Lynch EA, McGlone M, Meeks S, Mensing S, Meyer G, Minckley T, Mohr J, Nelson DM, New J, Newnham R, Noti R, Oswald W, Pierce J, Richard PJH, Rowe C, Goni MFS, Shuman BN, Takahara H, Toney J, Turney C, Urrego-Sanchez DH, Umbanhowar C, Vandergoes M, Vanniere B, Vescovi E, Walsh M, Wang X, Williams N, Wilmshurst J, Zhang JHet al., 2008, Changes in fire regimes since the Last Glacial Maximum: an assessment based on a global synthesis and analysis of charcoal data, CLIMATE DYNAMICS, Vol: 30, Pages: 887-907, ISSN: 0930-7575

Journal article

Arneth A, Miller PA, Scholze M, Hickler T, Schurgers G, Smith B, Prentice ICet al., 2007, CO2 inhibition of global terrestrial isoprene emissions: Potential implications for atmospheric chemistry, GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 34, ISSN: 0094-8276

Journal article

Liu Z, Wang Y, Gallimore R, Gasse F, Johnson T, deMenocal P, Adkins J, Notaro M, Prentice IC, Kutzbach J, Jacob R, Behling P, Wang L, Ong Eet al., 2007, Simulating the transient evolution and abrupt change of Northern Africa atmosphere-ocean-terrestrial ecosystem in the Holocene, Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol: 26, Pages: 1818-1837, ISSN: 0277-3791

We present the first synchronously coupled transient simulation of the evolution of the northern Africa climate-ecosystem for the last 6500 years in a global general circulation ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem model. The model simulated the major abrupt vegetation collapse in the southern Sahara at about 5 ka, consistent with the proxy records. Local precipitation, however, shows a much more gradual decline with time, implying a lack of strong positive vegetation feedback on annual rainfall during the collapse. The vegetation change in northern Africa is driven by local precipitation decline and strong precipitation variability. In contrast, the change of precipitation is dominated by internal climate variability and a gradual monsoonal climate response to orbital forcing. In addition, some minor vegetation changes are also simulated in different regions across northern Africa. The model also simulated a gradual annual mean surface cooling in the subtropical North Atlantic towards the latest Holocene, as well as a reduced seasonal cycle of SST. The SST response is caused largely by the insolation forcing, while the annual mean cooling is also reinforced by the increased coastal upwelling near the east boundary. The increased upwelling results from a southward retreat of the North Africa monsoon system, and, in turn, an increased northeasterly trade wind. The simulated changes of SST and upwelling are also largely consistent with marine proxy records, albeit with a weaker magnitude in the model. The mismatch between the collapse of vegetation and gradual transition of rainfall suggests that the vegetation collapse is not caused by a strong positive vegetation feedback. Instead, it is suggested that the Mid-Holocene collapse of North African vegetation is caused mainly by a nonlinear response of the vegetation to a precipitation threshold in the presence of strong climate variability. The implication to the modeling and observations is also discussed. © 20

Journal article

Zaehle S, Bondeau A, Carter TR, Cramer W, Erhard M, Prentice IC, Reginster I, Rounsevell MDA, Sitch S, Smith B, Smith PC, Sykes Met al., 2007, Projected changes in terrestrial carbon storage in Europe under climate and land-use change, 1990-2100, ECOSYSTEMS, Vol: 10, Pages: 380-401, ISSN: 1432-9840

Journal article

Arneth A, Niinemets U, Pressley S, Back J, Hari P, Karl T, Noe S, Prentice IC, Serca D, Hickler T, Wolf A, Smith Bet al., 2007, Process-based estimates of terrestrial ecosystem isoprene emissions: incorporating the effects of a direct CO2-isoprene interaction, ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, Vol: 7, Pages: 31-53, ISSN: 1680-7316

Journal article

Liu Z, Wang Y, Gallimore R, Notaro M, Prentice ICet al., 2006, On the cause of abrupt vegetation collapse in North Africa during the Holocene: Climate variability vs. vegetation feedback, GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 33, ISSN: 0094-8276

Journal article

Hickler T, Prentice IC, Smith B, Sykes MT, Zaehle Set al., 2006, Implementing plant hydraulic architecture within the LPJ Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, GLOBAL ECOLOGY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY, Vol: 15, Pages: 567-577, ISSN: 1466-822X

Journal article

Hickler T, Prentice IC, Smith B, Sykes MT, Zaehle Set al., 2006, Implementing plant hydraulic architecture within the LPJ Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol: 15, Pages: 567-577, ISSN: 1466-822X

Aim: To implement plant hydraulic architecture within the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ-DGVM), and to test the model against a set of observational data. If the model can reproduce major patterns in vegetation and ecosystem processes, we consider this to be an important linkage between plant physiology and larger-scale ecosystem dynamics. Location: The location is global, geographically distributed. Methods: A literature review was carried out to derive model formulations and parameter values for representing the hydraulic characteristics of major global plant functional types (PFTs) in a DGVM. After implementing the corresponding formulations within the LPJ-DGVM, present-day model output was compared to observational data. Results: The model reproduced observed broad-scale patterns in potential natural vegetation, but it failed to distinguish accurately between different types of grassland and savanna vegetation, possibly related to inadequate model representations of water fluxes in the soil and wildfire effects. Compared to a version of the model using an empirical formulation for calculating plant water supply without considering plant hydraulic architecture, the new formulation improved simulated patterns of vegetation in particular for dry shrublands. Global-scale simulation results for runoff and actual evapotranspiration (AET) corresponded well to available data. The model also successfully reproduced the magnitude and seasonal cycle of AET for most EUROFLUX forests, while modelled variation in NPP across a large number of sites spanning several biomes showed a strong correlation with estimates from field measurements. Main conclusions: The model was generally confirmed by comparison to observational data. The novel model representation of water flow within plants makes it possible to resolve mechanistically the effects of hydraulic differences between plant functional groups on vegetation structure, water cycling, and competition. T

Journal article

Le Quéré C, Prentice IC, Rivkin RB, 2006, Modeling interactions between marine ecosystems and climate, Eos, Vol: 87, ISSN: 0096-3941

Journal article

Scholze M, Knorr W, Arnell NW, Prentice ICet al., 2006, A climate-change risk analysis for world ecosystems, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 103, Pages: 13116-13120, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Zaehle S, Sitch S, Prentice IC, Liski J, Cramer W, Erhard M, Hickler T, Smith Bet al., 2006, The importance of age-related decline in forest NPP for modeling regional carbon balances, ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS, Vol: 16, Pages: 1555-1574, ISSN: 1051-0761

Journal article

Ni J, Harrison SP, Prentice IC, Kutzbach JE, Sitch Set al., 2006, Impact of climate variability on present and Holocene vegetation: A model-based study, ECOLOGICAL MODELLING, Vol: 191, Pages: 469-486, ISSN: 0304-3800

Journal article

Schaphoff S, Lucht W, Gerten D, Sitch S, Cramer W, Prentice ICet al., 2006, Terrestrial biosphere carbon storage under alternative climate projections, CLIMATIC CHANGE, Vol: 74, Pages: 97-122, ISSN: 0165-0009

Journal article

Morales P, Sykes MT, Prentice IC, Smith P, Smith B, Bugmann H, Zierl B, Friedlingstein P, Viovy N, Sabate S, Sanchez A, Pla E, Gracia CA, Sitch S, Arneth A, Ogee Jet al., 2005, Comparing and evaluating process-based ecosystem model predictions of carbon and water fluxes in major European forest biomes, GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, Vol: 11, Pages: 2211-2233, ISSN: 1354-1013

Journal article

Schroter D, Cramer W, Leemans R, Prentice IC, Araujo MB, Arnell NW, Bondeau A, Bugmann H, Carter TR, Gracia CA, de la Vega-Leinert AC, Erhard M, Ewert F, Glendining M, House JI, Kankaanpaa S, Klein RJT, Lavorel S, Lindner M, Metzger MJ, Meyer J, Mitchell TD, Reginster I, Rounsevell M, Sabate S, Sitch S, Smith B, Smith J, Smith P, Sykes MT, Thonicke K, Thuiller W, Tuck G, Zaehle S, Zierl Bet al., 2005, Ecosystem service supply and vulnerability to global change in Europe, SCIENCE, Vol: 310, Pages: 1333-1337, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Le Quéré C, Harrison SP, Prentice IC, Buitenhuis ET, Aumont O, Bopp L, Claustre H, Cotrim Da Cunha L, Geider R, Giraud X, Klaas C, Kohfeld KE, Legendre L, Manizza M, Platt T, Rivkin RB, Sathyendranath S, Uitz J, Watson AJ, Wolf-Gladrow Det al., 2005, Ecosystem dynamics based on plankton functional types for global ocean biogeochemistry models, Global Change Biology, Vol: 11, Pages: 2016-2040, ISSN: 1354-1013

Ecosystem processes are important determinants of the biogeochemistry of the ocean, and they can be profoundly affected by changes in climate. Ocean models currently express ecosystem processes through empirically derived parameterizations that tightly link key geochemical tracers to ocean physics. The explicit inclusion of ecosystem processes in models will permit ecological changes to be taken into account, and will allow us to address several important questions, including the causes of observed glacial-interglacial changes in atmospheric trace gases and aerosols, and how the oceanic uptake of CO2 is likely to change in the future. There is an urgent need to assess our mechanistic understanding of the environmental factors that exert control over marine ecosystems, and to represent their natural complexity based on theoretical understanding. We present a prototype design for a Dynamic Green Ocean Model (DGOM) based on the identification of (a) key plankton functional types that need to be simulated explicitly to capture important biogeochemical processes in the ocean; (b) key processes controlling the growth and mortality of these functional types and hence their interactions; and (c) sources of information necessary to parameterize each of these processes within a modeling framework. We also develop a strategy for model evaluation, based on simulation of both past and present mean state and variability, and identify potential sources of validation data for each. Finally, we present a DGOM-based strategy for addressing key questions in ocean biogeochemistry. This paper thus presents ongoing work in ocean biogeochemical modeling, which, it is hoped will motivate international collaborations to improve our understanding of the role of the ocean in the climate system. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Journal article

Le Quere C, Harrison SP, Prentice IC, Buitenhuis ET, Aumont O, Bopp L, Claustre H, Da Cunha LC, Geider R, Giraud X, Klaas C, Kohfeld KE, Legendre L, Manizza M, Platt T, Rivkin RB, Sathyendranath S, Uitz J, Watson AJ, Wolf-Gladrow Det al., 2005, Ecosystem dynamics based on plankton functional types for global ocean biogeochemistry models, GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, Vol: 11, Pages: 2016-2040, ISSN: 1354-1013

Journal article

Spessa A, McBeth B, Prentice C, 2005, Relationships among fire frequency, rainfall and vegetation patterns in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia: An analysis based on NOAA-AVHRR data, Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol: 14, Pages: 439-454, ISSN: 1466-822X

Aim To quantify the regional-scale spatio-temporal relationships among rainfall, vegetation and fire frequency in the Australian wet-dry tropics (AWDT). Location Northern Australia: Cape York Peninsula, central Arnhem, central Kimberly, Einasleigh Uplands, Gulf Fall Uplands and northern Kimberley. Methods Monthly 'fraction of photosynthetic active radiation absorbed by green vegetation' (fAPAR) was decomposed into monthly evergreen (EG) and monthly raingreen (RG) components using time-series techniques applied to monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery. Fire affected areas were independently mapped at the same spatio-temporal resolution from AVHRR imagery. Weather station records were spatially interpolated to create monthly rainfall surfaces. Vegetation structural classes were derived from a digitized map of northern Australian vegetation communities (1:1,000,000). Generalized linear models were used to quantify relationships among the fAPAR, EG and RG signals, vegetation structure, rainfall and fire frequency, for the period November 1996-December 2001. Results The fAPAR and EG signals are positively correlated with annual rainfall and canopy cover, notably: EGclosed forest > EG open heathland > EGopen forest > EG woodland > EGopen woodland > EG low woodland > EGlow open woodland > EG open grassland· Vegetation height and fAPAR are positively correlated, excluding the special case of open heathland. The RG signal is highest where intermediate annual rainfall and strong seasonality in rainfall coincide, and is associated with vegetation structure as follows: RG open grassland > RGwoodland > RG open forest > RGopen heathland > RG low woodland > RGopen woodland > RG low open woodland > RGclosed forset · Monthly RG tracks monthly rainfall. Annual proportion of area burnt (PB) is maximal where high RG coincides with low EG (open grass

Journal article

Notaro M, Liu ZY, Gallimore R, Vavrus SJ, Kutzbach JE, Prentice IC, Jacob RLet al., 2005, Simulated and observed preindustrial to modern vegetation and climate changes, JOURNAL OF CLIMATE, Vol: 18, Pages: 3650-3671, ISSN: 0894-8755

Journal article

Thonicke K, Prentice IC, Hewitt C, 2005, Modeling glacial-interglacial changes in global fire regimes and trace gas emissions, GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, Vol: 19, ISSN: 0886-6236

Journal article

Foley JA, DeFries R, Asner GP, Barford C, Bonan G, Carpenter SR, Chapin FS, Coe MT, Daily GC, Gibbs HK, Helkowski JH, Holloway T, Howard EA, Kucharik CJ, Monfreda C, Patz JA, Prentice IC, Ramankutty N, Snyder PKet al., 2005, Global consequences of land use, SCIENCE, Vol: 309, Pages: 570-574, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Thuiller W, Lavorel S, Araujo MB, Sykes MT, Prentice ICet al., 2005, Climate change threats to plant diversity in Europe, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 102, Pages: 8245-8250, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Krinner G, Viovy N, de Noblet-Ducoudre N, Ogee J, Polcher J, Friedlingstein P, Ciais P, Sitch S, Prentice ICet al., 2005, A dynamic global vegetation model for studies of the coupled atmosphere-biosphere system, GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, Vol: 19, ISSN: 0886-6236

Journal article

Knorr W, Prentice IC, House JI, Holland EAet al., 2005, Long-term sensitivity of soil carbon turnover to warming, NATURE, Vol: 433, Pages: 298-301, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

TER BRAAK CJF, PRENTICE IC, 2004, A Theory of Gradient Analysis, Advances in Ecological Research, Vol: 34, Pages: 235-282, ISSN: 0065-2504

Journal article

Wania R, Prentice C, Harrison S, Hornibrook E, Gedney N, Christensen T, Clymo Ret al., 2004, The role of natural wetlands in the global methane cycle, ISSN: 0096-3941

Conference paper

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