Imperial College London

Professor Iain Colin Prentice

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Chair in Biosphere and Climate Impacts
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2354c.prentice

 
 
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Location

 

1.1Centre for Population BiologySilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

298 results found

Bloomfield KJ, Cernusak LA, Eamus D, Ellsworth DS, Prentice IC, Wright IJ, Boer MM, Bradford MG, Cale P, Cleverly J, Egerton JJG, Evans BJ, Hayes LS, Hutchinson MF, Liddell MJ, Macfarlane C, Meyer WS, Prober SM, Togashi HF, Wardlaw T, Zhu L, Atkin OKet al., 2018, A continental-scale assessment of variability in leaf traits: Within species, across sites and between seasons, FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 32, Pages: 1492-1506, ISSN: 0269-8463

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harrison SP, Bartlein PJ, Brovkin V, Houweling S, Kloster S, Prentice ICet al., 2018, The biomass burning contribution to climate-carbon-cycle feedback, Earth System Dynamics, Vol: 9, Pages: 663-677, ISSN: 2190-4979

Temperature exerts strong controls on the incidence and severity of fire. All else equal, warming is expected to increase fire-related carbon emissions, and thereby atmospheric CO2. But the magnitude of this feedback is very poorly known. We use a single-box model of the land biosphere to quantify this positive feedback from satellite-based estimates of biomass burning emissions for 2000–2014 CE and from sedimentary charcoal records for the millennium before the industrial period. We derive an estimate of the centennial-scale feedback strength of 6.5 ± 3.4 ppm CO2 per degree of land temperature increase, based on the satellite data. However, this estimate is poorly constrained, and is largely driven by the well-documented dependence of tropical deforestation and peat fires (primarily anthropogenic) on climate variability patterns linked to the El Niño–Southern Oscillation. Palaeo-data from pre-industrial times provide the opportunity to assess the fire-related climate–carbon-cycle feedback over a longer period, with less pervasive human impacts. Past biomass burning can be quantified based on variations in either the concentration and isotopic composition of methane in ice cores (with assumptions about the isotopic signatures of different methane sources) or the abundances of charcoal preserved in sediments, which reflect landscape-scale changes in burnt biomass. These two data sources are shown here to be coherent with one another. The more numerous data from sedimentary charcoal, expressed as normalized anomalies (fractional deviations from the long-term mean), are then used – together with an estimate of mean biomass burning derived from methane isotope data – to infer a feedback strength of 5.6 ± 3.2 ppm CO2 per degree of land temperature and (for a climate sensitivity of 2.8 K) a gain of 0.09 ± 0.05. This finding indicates that the positive carbon cycle feedback from increased fire provides a substantial

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lusk CH, Clearwater MJ, Laughlin DC, Harrison SP, Prentice IC, Nordenstahl M, Smith Bet al., 2018, Frost and leaf-size gradients in forests: global patterns and experimental evidence, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 219, Pages: 565-573, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Stocker BD, Zscheischler J, Keenan TF, Prentice IC, Penuelas J, Seneviratne SIet al., 2018, Quantifying soil moisture impacts on light use efficiency across biomes, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 218, Pages: 1430-1449, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Terrer C, Vicca S, Stocker BD, Hungate BA, Phillips RP, Reich PB, Finzi AC, Prentice ICet al., 2018, Ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 governed by plant-soil interactions and the cost of nitrogen acquisition, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 217, Pages: 507-522, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Togashi HF, Prentice IC, Atkin OK, Macfarlane C, Prober SM, Bloomfield KJ, Evans BJet al., 2018, Thermal acclimation of leaf photosynthetic traits in an evergreen woodland, consistent with the coordination hypothesis, BIOGEOSCIENCES, Vol: 15, Pages: 3461-3474, ISSN: 1726-4170

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wang H, Harrison SP, Prentice IC, Yang Y, Bai F, Togashi HF, Wang M, Zhou S, Ni Jet al., 2018, The China Plant Trait Database: toward a comprehensive regional compilation of functional traits for land plants, ECOLOGY, Vol: 99, Pages: 500-500, ISSN: 0012-9658

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Colloff MJ, Lavorel S, van Kerkhoff LE, Wyborn CA, Fazey I, Gorddard R, Mace GM, Foden WB, Dunlop M, Prentice IC, Crowley J, Leadley P, Degeorges Pet al., 2017, Transforming conservation science and practice for a postnormal world, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 1008-1017, ISSN: 0888-8892

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Davis T, Prentice IC, Stocker BD, Thomas RT, Whitley RJ, Wang H, Evans BJ, Gallego-Sala AV, Sykes MT, Cramer Wet al., 2017, Simple process-led algorithms for simulating habitats (SPLASH v.1.0): robust indices of radiation, evapotranspiration and plant-available moisture, GEOSCIENTIFIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1991-959X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Davis TW, Prentice IC, Stocker BD, Whitely RJ, Wang H, Evans BJ, Gallego-Sala AV, Sykes MT, Cramer Wet al., 2017, Simple Process-Led Algorithms for Simulating Habitats (SPLASH v.1.0): Robust Indices of Radiation, Evapotranspiration and Plant-Available Moisture, Geoscientific Model Development, Vol: 10, Pages: 689-708, ISSN: 1991-959X

Bioclimatic indices for use in studies of ecosystemfunction, species distribution, and vegetation dynamics underchanging climate scenarios depend on estimates of surfacefluxes and other quantities, such as radiation, evapotranspi-ration and soil moisture, for which direct observations aresparse. These quantities can be derived indirectly from me-teorological variables, such as near-surface air temperature,precipitation and cloudiness. Here we present a consolidatedset of simple process-led algorithms for simulating habitats(SPLASH) allowing robust approximations of key quantitiesat ecologically relevant timescales. We specify equations,derivations, simplifications, and assumptions for the estima-tion of daily and monthly quantities of top-of-the-atmospheresolar radiation, net surface radiation, photosynthetic photonflux density, evapotranspiration (potential, equilibrium, andactual), condensation, soil moisture, and runoff, based onanalysis of their relationship to fundamental climatic drivers.The climatic drivers include a minimum of three meteoro-logical inputs: precipitation, air temperature, and fraction ofbright sunshine hours. Indices, such as the moisture index,the climatic water deficit, and the Priestley–Taylor coeffi-cient, are also defined. The SPLASH code is transcribed inC++, FORTRAN, Python, and R. A total of 1 year of resultsare presented at the local and global scales to exemplify thespatiotemporal patterns of daily and monthly model outputsalong with comparisons to other model results.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dong N, Prentice IC, Evans BJ, Caddy-Retalic S, Lowe AJ, Wright IJet al., 2017, Leaf nitrogen from first principles: field evidence for adaptive variation with climate, BIOGEOSCIENCES, Vol: 14, Pages: 481-495, ISSN: 1726-4170

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dong N, Prentice IC, Harrison SP, Song QH, Zhang YPet al., 2017, Biophysical homoeostasis of leaf temperature: A neglected process for vegetation and land-surface modelling, GLOBAL ECOLOGY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY, Vol: 26, Pages: 998-1007, ISSN: 1466-822X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goll DS, Winkler AJ, Raddatz T, Dong N, Prentice IC, Ciais P, Brovkin Vet al., 2017, Carbon-nitrogen interactions in idealized simulations with JSBACH (version 3.10), GEOSCIENTIFIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 10, Pages: 2009-2030, ISSN: 1991-959X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Keenan TF, Prentice IC, Canadell JG, Williams CA, Wang H, Raupach M, Collatz GJet al., 2017, Recent pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake (vol 7, 13428, 2016), NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2041-1723

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Li G, Gerhart LM, Harrison SP, Ward JK, Harris JM, Prentice ICet al., 2017, Changes in biomass allocation buffer low CO2 effects on tree growth during the last glaciation, SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2045-2322

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Prentice IC, Cleator SF, Huang YH, Harrison SP, Roulstone Iet al., 2017, Reconstructing ice-age palaeoclimates: Quantifying low-CO2 effects on plants, GLOBAL AND PLANETARY CHANGE, Vol: 149, Pages: 166-176, ISSN: 0921-8181

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rabin SS, Melton JR, Lasslop G, Bachelet D, Forrest M, Hantson S, Kaplan JO, Li F, Mangeon S, Ward DS, Yue C, Arora VK, Hickler T, Kloster S, Knorr W, Nieradzik L, Spessa A, Folberth GA, Sheehan T, Voulgarakis A, Kelley DI, Prentice IC, Sitch S, Harrison S, Arneth Aet al., 2017, The Fire Modeling Intercomparison Project (FireMIP), phase 1: experimental and analytical protocols with detailed model descriptions, GEOSCIENTIFIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 10, Pages: 1175-1197, ISSN: 1991-959X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rogers A, Medlyn BE, Dukes JS, Bonan G, von Caemmerer S, Dietze MC, Kattge J, Leakey ADB, Mercado LM, Niinemets U, Prentice IC, Serbin SP, Sitch S, Way DA, Zaehle Set al., 2017, A roadmap for improving the representation of photosynthesis in Earth system models, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 213, Pages: 22-42, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Terrer C, Vicca S, Hungate BA, Phillips RP, Reich PB, Franklin O, Stocker BD, Fisher JB, Prentice ICet al., 2017, Response to Comment on "Mycorrhizal association as a primary control of the CO2 fertilization effect", SCIENCE, Vol: 355, ISSN: 0036-8075

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wang H, Prentice IC, Davis TW, Keenan TF, Wright IJ, Peng Cet al., 2017, Photosynthetic responses to altitude: an explanation based on optimality principles, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 213, Pages: 976-982, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wang H, Prentice IC, Keenan TF, Davis TW, Wright IJ, Cornwell WK, Evans BJ, Peng Cet al., 2017, Towards a universal model for carbon dioxide uptake by plants, NATURE PLANTS, Vol: 3, Pages: 734-741, ISSN: 2055-026X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wright IJ, Dong N, Maire V, Prentice IC, Westoby M, Diaz S, Gallagher RV, Jacobs BF, Kooyman R, Law EA, Leishman MR, Niinemets U, Reich PB, Sack L, Villar R, Wang H, Wilf Pet al., 2017, Global climatic drivers of leaf size, SCIENCE, Vol: 357, Pages: 917-+, ISSN: 0036-8075

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Xu-Ri, Prentice IC, 2017, Modelling the demand for new nitrogen fixation by terrestrial ecosystems, BIOGEOSCIENCES, Vol: 14, Pages: 2003-2017, ISSN: 1726-4170

JOURNAL ARTICLE

De Kauwe MG, Keenan TF, Medlyn BE, Prentice IC, Terrer Cet al., 2016, Satellite based estimates underestimate the effect of CO<inf>2</inf> fertilization on net primary productivity, Nature Climate Change, Vol: 6, Pages: 892-893, ISSN: 1758-678X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

De Kauwe MG, Lin Y-S, Wright IJ, Medlyn BE, Crous KY, Ellsworth DS, Maire V, Prentice IC, Atkin OK, Rogers Aet al., 2016, A test of the 'one-point method' for estimating maximum carboxylation capacity from field-measured, light-saturated photosynthesis (vol 210, pg 1130, 2016), NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 212, Pages: 792-792, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

De Kauwe MG, Lin Y-S, Wright IJ, Medlyn BE, Crous KY, Ellsworth DS, Maire V, Prentice IC, Atkin OK, Rogers A, Niinemets U, Serbin SP, Meir P, Uddling J, Togashi HF, Tarvainen L, Weerasinghe LK, Evans BJ, Ishida FY, Domingues TFet al., 2016, A test of the 'one-point method' for estimating maximum carboxylation capacity from field-measured, light-saturated photosynthesis, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 210, Pages: 1130-1144, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Diaz S, Kattge J, Cornelissen JHC, Wright IJ, Lavorel S, Dray S, Reu B, Kleyer M, Wirth C, Prentice IC, Garnier E, Boenisch G, Westoby M, Poorter H, Reich PB, Moles AT, Dickie J, Gillison AN, Zanne AE, Chave J, Wright SJ, Sheremet'ev SN, Jactel H, Baraloto C, Cerabolini B, Pierce S, Shipley B, Kirkup D, Casanoves F, Joswig JS, Guenther A, Falczuk V, Rueger N, Mahecha MD, Gorne LDet al., 2016, The global spectrum of plant form and function, NATURE, Vol: 529, Pages: 167-U73, ISSN: 0028-0836

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gallego-Sala AV, Booth RK, Charman DJ, Prentice IC, Yu Zet al., 2016, Peatlands and climate change, Peatland Restoration and Ecosystem Services: Science, Policy and Practice, Pages: 129-150, ISBN: 9781139177788

© British Ecological Society 2016. Introduction The fundamental reason for the presence of peatlands is a positive balance between plant production and decomposition of organic matter. Organic matter accumulates in these systems because prolonged waterlogged conditions result in soil anoxia (i.e. exclusion of oxygen), and under these conditions decomposition rates can be lower than those of primary production, as seen in Figure 8.1. Climate therefore plays an important role in peat accumulation, both directly by affecting plant productivity and decomposition of organic matter, and indirectly through its effects on hydrology, water balance and vegetation composition (for a summary, refer to Yu, Beilman and Jones (2009)). Climate provides broad-scale controls on peatland extent, types and vegetation, and ultimately, ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration and storage, as well as water and hazard regulation (Chapters 4 and 5). Peatlands can therefore play a vital role in ecosystem-based adaptation in helping society mitigate and adapt to climate change. Future climate change is likely to alter the hydrology and soil temperature of peatlands, with far-reaching consequences for their biodiversity, ecology and biogeochemistry, and interactions with the Earth system. For example, the possibility of drier conditions allowing peat erosion and increases in CO2emissions that would result in a positive feedback to climate change (Turetsky 2010). Peatlands that have been damaged by human activity are more vulnerable to climate-induced changes in hydrology and temperature, but suitable management strategies may make them more resilient to changes and help to stabilise the delivery of ecosystem services (Chapter 1). This chapter describes the interactions between climate and peatlands in three sections. The first section explains how present climate influences peatlands, by documenting how climate limits peatland geographical extent globally, and how bioclimatic envel

BOOK CHAPTER

Gallego-Sala AV, Charman DJ, Harrison SP, Li G, Prentice ICet al., 2016, Climate-driven expansion of blanket bogs in Britain during the Holocene, CLIMATE OF THE PAST, Vol: 12, Pages: 129-136, ISSN: 1814-9324

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hantson S, Arneth A, Harrison SP, Kelley DI, Prentice IC, Rabin SS, Archibald S, Mouillot F, Arnold SR, Artaxo P, Bachelet D, Ciais P, Forrest M, Friedlingstein P, Hickler T, Kaplan JO, Kloster S, Knorr W, Lasslop G, Li F, Mangeon S, Melton JR, Meyn A, Sitch S, Spessa A, van der Werf GR, Voulgarakis A, Yue Cet al., 2016, The status and challenge of global fire modelling, BIOGEOSCIENCES, Vol: 13, Pages: 3359-3375, ISSN: 1726-4170

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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