Imperial College London

ProfessorCarolPropper

Business School

Associate Dean of Faculty and Research, Chair in Economics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9291c.propper CV

 
 
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Location

 

276Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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117 results found

Burgess S, Propper C, Ratto M, Tominey Eet al., 2017, Incentives in the Public Sector: Evidence from a Government Agency, Economic Journal, Vol: 127, Pages: F117-F141, ISSN: 0013-0133

© 2017 Royal Economic Society We study the impact of team-based performance pay in a major UK government agency, the public employment service. The scheme covered quantity and quality targets, measured with varying degrees of precision. We use unique data from the agency's performance management system and personnel records, linked to local labour market data. We show that on average the scheme had no significant effect but had a substantial positive effect in small teams, fitting an explanation combining free riding and peer monitoring. The impact was greater on better-measured quantity outcomes than quality outcomes. The scheme was very cost effective in small offices.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jones DB, Propper C, Smith S, 2017, Wolves in sheep's clothing: Is non-profit status used to signal quality?, J Health Econ, Vol: 55, Pages: 108-120

Why do many firms in the healthcare sector adopt non-profit status? One argument is that non-profit status serves as a signal of quality when consumers are not well informed. A testable implication is that an increase in consumer information may lead to a reduction in the number of non-profits in a market. We test this idea empirically by exploiting an exogenous increase in consumer information in the US nursing home industry. We find that the information shock led to a reduction in the share of non-profit homes, driven by a combination of home closure and sector switching. The lowest quality non-profits were the most likely to exit. Our results have important implications for the effects of reforms to increase consumer provision in a number of public services.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Santos R, Gravelle H, Propper C, 2017, Does Quality Affect Patients’ Choice of Doctor? Evidence from England, Economic Journal, Vol: 127, Pages: 445-494, ISSN: 0013-0133

© 2015 The Authors. The Economic Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Economic Society Reforms giving users of public services choice of provider aim to improve quality. But such reforms will work only if quality affects choice of provider. We test this crucial prerequisite in the English health care market by examining the choice of 3.4 million individuals of family doctor. Family doctor practices provide primary care and control access to non-emergency hospital care, the quality of their clinical care is measured and published and care is free. In this setting, clinical quality should affect choice. We find that a 1 standard deviation increase in clinical quality would increase practice size by around 17%.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Britton J, Propper C, 2016, Teacher pay and school productivity: Exploiting wage regulation, Journal of Public Economics, Vol: 133, Pages: 75-89, ISSN: 0047-2727

© 2015 The Authors. The impact of teacher pay on school productivity is a central concern for governments worldwide, yet evidence is mixed. In this paper we exploit a feature of teacher labour markets to determine the impact of teacher wages. Teacher wages are commonly set in a manner that results in flat wages across heterogeneous labour markets. This creates an exogenous gap between the outside labour market and inside (regulated) wage for teachers. We use the centralised wage regulation of teachers in England to examine the effect of pay on school performance. We use data on over 3000 schools containing around 200,000 teachers who educate around half a million children per year. We find that teachers respond to pay. A ten percent shock to the wage gap between local labour market and teacher wages results in an average loss of around 2% in average school performance in the key exams taken at the end of compulsory schooling in England.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cookson R, Propper C, Asaria M, Raine Ret al., 2016, Socio-Economic Inequalities in Health Care in England, Fiscal Studies, Vol: 37, Pages: 371-403, ISSN: 0143-5671

� 2016 The Authors. Fiscal Studies published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. on behalf of Institute for Fiscal Studies This paper reviews what is known about socio-economic inequalities in health care in England, with particular attention to inequalities relative to need that may be considered unfair (‘inequities’). We call inequalities of 5�per�cent or less between the most and least deprived socio-economic quintile groups ‘slight’, inequalities of 5–15�per�cent ‘moderate’ and inequalities of more than 15�per�cent ‘substantial’. Overall public health care expenditure is substantially concentrated on poorer people. At any given age, poorer people are more likely to see their family doctor, have a public outpatient appointment, visit accident and emergency, and stay in hospital for publicly-funded inpatient treatment. After allowing for current self-assessed health and morbidity, there is slight pro-rich inequity in combined public and private medical specialist visits but not in family doctor visits. There are also slight pro-rich inequities in overall indicators of clinical process quality and patient experience from public health care, substantial pro-rich inequalities in bereaved people's experiences of health and social care for recently deceased relatives, and mostly slight but occasionally substantial pro-rich inequities in the use of preventive care (for example, dental check-ups, eye tests, screening and vaccination) and a few specific treatments (for example, hip and knee replacement). Studies of population health care outcomes (for example, avoidable emergency hospitalisation) find substantial pro-rich inequality after adjusting for age and sex only. These findings are all consistent with a broad economic framework that sees health care as just one input into

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaynor M, Propper C, Seiler S, 2016, Free to Choose? Reform, Choice, and Consideration Sets in the English National Health Service, American Economic Review, Vol: 106, Pages: 3521-3557, ISSN: 0002-8282

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Janke K, Propper C, Shields MA, 2016, Assaults, murders and walkers: The impact of violent crime on physical activity., J Health Econ, Vol: 47, Pages: 34-49

We investigate an underexplored externality of crime: the impact of violent crime on individuals' participation in walking. For many adults walking is the only regular physical activity. We use a sample of nearly 1 million people in 323 small areas in England between 2005 and 2011 matched to quarterly crime data at the small area level. Within area variation identifies the causal effect of local violent crime on walking and a difference-in-difference analysis of two high-profile crimes corroborates our results. We find a significant deterrent effect of violent crime on walking that translates into a drop in overall physical activity.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

von Hinke S, Davey Smith G, Lawlor DA, Propper C, Windmeijer Fet al., 2016, Genetic markers as instrumental variables, Journal of Health Economics, Vol: 45, Pages: 131-148, ISSN: 0167-6296

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bloom N, Propper C, Seiler S, Van Reenen Jet al., 2015, The Impact of Competition on Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals, The Review of Economic Studies, Vol: 82, Pages: 457-489, ISSN: 0034-6527

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Feng Y, Pistollato M, Charlesworth A, Devlin N, Propper C, Sussex Jet al., 2015, Association between market concentration of hospitals and patient health gain following hip replacement surgery, JOURNAL OF HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH & POLICY, Vol: 20, Pages: 11-17, ISSN: 1355-8196

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sayal K, Washbrook E, Propper C, 2015, Childhood Behavior Problems and Academic Outcomes in Adolescence: Longitudinal Population-Based Study, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 54, Pages: 360-368, ISSN: 0890-8567

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Farrell L, Hollingsworth B, Propper C, Shields MAet al., 2014, The socioeconomic gradient in physical inactivity: Evidence from one million adults in England, SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE, Vol: 123, Pages: 55-63, ISSN: 0277-9536

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnston D, Propper C, Pudney S, Shields Met al., 2014, CHILD MENTAL HEALTH AND EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: MULTIPLE OBSERVERS AND THE MEASUREMENT ERROR PROBLEM, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Vol: 29, Pages: 880-900, ISSN: 0883-7252

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnston DW, Propper C, Pudney SE, Shields MAet al., 2014, The income gradient in childhood mental health: all in the eye of the beholder?, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society), Vol: 177, Pages: 807-827, ISSN: 0964-1998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

McCormack J, Propper C, Smith S, 2014, HERDING CATS? MANAGEMENT AND UNIVERSITY PERFORMANCE, ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Vol: 124, Pages: F534-F564, ISSN: 0013-0133

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Washbrook E, Gregg P, Propper C, 2014, A decomposition analysis of the relationship between parental income and multiple child outcomes, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society), Vol: 177, Pages: 757-782, ISSN: 0964-1998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaynor M, Moreno-Serra R, Propper C, 2013, Death by Market Power: Reform, Competition, and Patient Outcomes in the National Health Service, AMERICAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL-ECONOMIC POLICY, Vol: 5, Pages: 134-166, ISSN: 1945-7731

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Howe LD, Lawlor DA, Propper C, 2013, Trajectories of socioeconomic inequalities in health, behaviours and academic achievement across childhood and adolescence, JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH, Vol: 67, Pages: 358-364, ISSN: 0143-005X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Janke KM, Propper C, Shields MA, 2013, Does Violent Crime Deter Physical Activity?, IZA Discussion Paper

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Propper C, Venables M-A, 2013, An assessment of Labours record on health and healthcare, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY, Vol: 29, Pages: 203-226, ISSN: 0266-903X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Scholder SVHK, Smith GD, Lawlor DA, Propper C, Windmeijer Fet al., 2013, Child height, health and human capital: Evidence using genetic markers, EUROPEAN ECONOMIC REVIEW, Vol: 57, Pages: 1-22, ISSN: 0014-2921

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Washbrook E, Propper C, Sayal K, 2013, Pre-school hyperactivity/attention problems and educational outcomes in adolescence: prospective longitudinal study, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 203, Pages: 265-271, ISSN: 0007-1250

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaynor M, Laudicella M, Propper C, 2012, Can governments do it better? Merger mania and hospital outcomes in the English NHS, JOURNAL OF HEALTH ECONOMICS, Vol: 31, Pages: 528-543, ISSN: 0167-6296

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaynor M, Moreno-Serra R, Propper C, 2012, Can competition improve outcomes in UK health care? Lessons from the past two decades, JOURNAL OF HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH & POLICY, Vol: 17, Pages: 49-54, ISSN: 1355-8196

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaynor MS, Propper C, Seiler S, 2012, Free to Choose? Reform and Demand Response in the English National Health Service

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaynor MS, Propper C, Seiler S, 2012, Free to Choose? Reform and Demand Response in the Englishnational Health Service

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Propper C, 2012, Competition, incentives and the English NHS, HEALTH ECONOMICS, Vol: 21, Pages: 33-40, ISSN: 1057-9230

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Propper C, Leckie G, 2012, Increasing Competition Between Providers in Health Care Markets: The Economic Evidence, The Oxford Handbook of Health Economics, ISBN: 9780191743719

© Oxford University Press 2011. All rights reserved. This article scrutinizes the empirical literature on competition between providers and finds that the outcomes are highly varied, and that competition generates winners and losers among patients as well as providers. It examines the theoretical and empirical economic evidence on the effect of greater competition between providers in health care markets. Most of the evidence focuses on a narrow set of outcomes, primarily the effect of competition on prices and quality of health care, sometimes with a focus on winners and losers. It discusses the impact of centrally fixed prices on competition and examines the role of information in increasing competition is also discussed. It examines the effects of using centrally set prices. This article concludes raising some issues that seem to be pertinent for policymakers interested in increasing competition in their health care systems.

BOOK CHAPTER

Propper C, Wilson D, 2012, The use of performance measures in health care systems, The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, Pages: 350-358, ISBN: 9781849802673

BOOK CHAPTER

Scholder SVHK, Smith GD, Lawlor DA, Propper C, Windmeijer Fet al., 2012, The effect of fat mass on educational attainment: Examining the sensitivity to different identification strategies, ECONOMICS & HUMAN BIOLOGY, Vol: 10, Pages: 405-418, ISSN: 1570-677X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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