Imperial College London

ProfessorChristopherTucci

Business School

Professor of Digital Strategy and Innovation
 
 
 
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Contact

 

c.tucci Website CV

 
 
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Location

 

Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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79 results found

Beck S, LaFlamme M, Bergenholtz C, Bogers M, Brasseur T-M, Conradsen M-L, Crowston K, Di Marco D, Effert A, Filiou D, Frederiksen L, Gillier T, Gruber M, Haeussler C, Hoisl K, Kokshagina O, Norn M-T, Poetz M, Pruschak G, Priego LP, Radziwon A, Ruser A, Sauermann H, Shah SK, Suess-Reyes J, Tucci CL, Tuertscher P, Vedel JB, Verganti R, Wareham J, Xu SMet al., 2021, Examining Open Innovation in Science (OIS): what Open Innovation can and cannot offer the science of science, INNOVATION-ORGANIZATION & MANAGEMENT, ISSN: 1447-9338

Journal article

Dehdarian A, Tucci CL, 2021, A complex network approach for analyzing early evolution of smart grid innovations in Europe, APPLIED ENERGY, Vol: 298, ISSN: 0306-2619

Journal article

Klincewicz K, Marczewska M, Tucci CL, 2021, Regional smart specializations in Central and Eastern Europe: Between political decisions and revealed technological potential, Partnerships for Regional Innovation and Development: Implementing Smart Specialization in Europe, Pages: 21-48, ISBN: 9780367352646

Book chapter

Viscusi G, Tucci CL, 2021, Crowd dynamics in internal crowdsourcing: Insights from higher education, Pages: 125-131, ISSN: 1613-0073

This article aims to study crowd dynamics in small teams. In particular, we are interested in internal crowdsourcing as a venue for new idea production, highlighting the difference with regard to other cooperative models based, e.g., on communities. Another goal of the study is to identify the setting for further experiments in business domains to investigate how crowd characteristics may lower or increase “crowd capital,” here defined as the total number of crowd units having a demonstrated effectiveness in idea generation or task achievement. Thus, the article aims to contribute to the research on coordination in temporary and flash teams. To this end, the article discusses the main results of six studies carried out with management students in higher education from 2014 to 2018.

Conference paper

Lanzolla G, Pesce D, Tucci CL, 2021, The digital transformation of search and recombination in the innovation function: tensions and an integrative framework*, Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol: 38, Pages: 30-113, ISSN: 0737-6782

Search and recombination are important mechanisms in the creativity phase of innovation. Digital transformation and the resulting pervasive digitalization of the innovation function have often been associated with increasing possibilities for search and recombination. In this paper, by systematically integrating the search and recombination literature with the literature on digitalization, we demonstrate that digitalization may engender new idiosyncratic tensions in the organizational antecedents of search and recombination and, by implication, in their likely outcomes. We propose that, depending on the interactions among the idiosyncratic tensions identified herein, knowledge recombination might spur very different outcomes, including knowledge layering, knowledge integration, knowledge grafting, or even no recombination at all (which we label “search for the sake of search”). These outcomes may not always be the initially planned desired outcomes. Finally, we provide implications of our integrative framework pertaining to product development and to organizing for innovation.

Journal article

Lanzolla G, Lorenz A, Miron-Spektor E, Schilling M, Solinas G, Tucci CLet al., 2020, DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: WHAT IS NEW IF ANYTHING? EMERGING PATTERNS AND MANAGEMENT RESEARCH, ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT DISCOVERIES, Vol: 6, Pages: 341-350

Journal article

Beck S, Bergenholtz C, Bogers M, Brasseur T-M, Conradsen ML, Di Marco D, Distel AP, Dobusch L, Doerler D, Effert A, Fecher B, Filiou D, Frederiksen L, Gillier T, Grimpe C, Gruber M, Haeussler C, Heigl F, Hoisl K, Hyslop K, Kokshagina O, LaFlamme M, Lawson C, Lifshitz-Assaf H, Lukas W, Nordberg M, Norn MT, Poetz M, Ponti M, Pruschak G, Priego LP, Radziwon A, Rafner J, Romanova G, Ruser A, Sauermann H, Shah SK, Sherson JF, Suess-Reyes J, Tucci CL, Tuertscher P, Vedel JB, Velden T, Verganti R, Wareham J, Wiggins A, Xu SMet al., 2020, The Open Innovation in Science research field: a collaborative conceptualisation approach, Industry and Innovation: dynamics, strategies, policies, Pages: 1-50, ISSN: 1366-2716

Openness and collaboration in scientific research are attracting increasing attention from scholars and practitioners alike. However, a common understanding of these phenomena is hindered by disciplinary boundaries and disconnected research streams. We link dispersed knowledge on Open Innovation, Open Science, and related concepts such as Responsible Research and Innovation by proposing a unifying Open Innovation in Science (OIS) Research Framework. This framework captures the antecedents, contingencies, and consequences of open and collaborative practices along the entire process of generating and disseminating scientific insights and translating them into innovation. Moreover, it elucidates individual-, team-, organisation-, field-, and society‐level factors shaping OIS practices. To conceptualise the framework, we employed a collaborative approach involving 47 scholars from multiple disciplines, highlighting both tensions and commonalities between existing approaches. The OIS Research Framework thus serves as a basis for future research, informs policy discussions, and provides guidance to scientists and practitioners.

Journal article

Chesbrough H, Tucci CL, 2020, The interplay between open innovation and lean startup, or, why large companies are not large versions of startups, Strategic Management Review, Vol: 1, Pages: 277-303, ISSN: 2688-2612

This article considers the contribution of lean startup to the lack of practical advice for employing inside-out knowledge flows in open innovation. Lean startup offers a series of practical steps for exploring — and validating — potential new business models that might utilize otherwise neglected technologies, or potential general-purpose technologies that may be languishing. Open innovation has some contributions to offer to lean startup as well, particularly in the context where lean startup is employed inside large established firms. We describe the basic principles of lean startup philosophy and discuss how lean startup is implemented in large companies. This is highly related to business model reconfiguration, since in many cases, incumbent companies develop a new business model as part of their innovation efforts, often with great difficulty. This line of reasoning leads us to reconsider how lean startup might work in established companies, and why it is so difficult due to conflicts with many roles that already exist in the established companies. We then bring forward the idea that open innovation can contribute to the corporate venturing process and describe both outside-in and inside-out processes that may help ease the pain of a lean startup implementation in an incumbent firm.

Journal article

Flores M, Golob M, Maklin D, Tucci CL, West S, Stoll Oet al., 2020, DARE2HACK: Crowdsourcing ideas through hackathons to codesign new human-centric services, Pages: 5-10

Organizations are continuously looking for ways to transform by adopting new practices and technologies in order to become more competitive. They target business growth by increasing their efficiencies, by improving their internal operations and/or delivering novel value-added products and services. This is not easy to accomplish, as it requires defining a new strategy, changing the way of working, training and engaging employees and interacting with the customers to address different global trends.One major challenge companies are facing is how to shift to collaboratively designing new services enabled by digital technologies, integrating talent from an ecosystem of experts. To design new services, organizations can start by reflecting on how they currently execute their innovation process. This latter is all about transforming ideas, data and knowledge into products or services launched successfully to the market. To accelerate their performance, organizations have been changing their practices, from working exclusively in-house to openly collaborating with external talent. Crowdsourcing refers to the necessary activities to collect 'out-of-the-box' ideas in order to benefit from the collective brainpower of diverse entrepreneurial individuals and/or their own employees. A Hackathon could be defined as a crowd-sourcing contest, in which a diverse talented crowd is asked to solve a business challenge within 1 to 2 days and only the winners receive compensation or an award. Although hackathons originally focused on coding, lately organizations have been increasingly organizing them to solve business challenges while applying customer-centric approaches such as Design Thinking. This paper provides the foundations to link these approaches and provide insights about a hackathon that enabled innovation experts from different organizations to provide their ideas and identify key services to be delivered by an innovation hub.

Conference paper

Khairullina A, Kirilenko AA, Neklyudov A, Tucci CLet al., 2020, Ideas-driven endogenous growth and standard-essential patents, Publisher: SSRN

In this paper, we study the impact of standard-essential status for patents on production possibilities of the economy and long-term growth. As we show, the innovators’ risk of losing the standard-setting game ex-ante attenuates the anticipation of a larger market share. Moreover, when the discovery rate of new technologies is smaller than the discounting rate of the monopoly profits, standards and standard- essential patents tend to be growth-reducing, despite a conjectured positive contribution of standards to the marginal productivity of human capital. Market failures associated with patent abuse have been treated historically by various measures ranging from compulsory licensing to imposing reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) pricing on essential technologies. We show that mandated compulsory licensing has a negative impact on long-term growth, while a voluntary FRAND pricing together with faster rates of follow-up innovations may be growth-enhancing.

Working paper

Lu Q, Tucci C, Murmann JP, Mao JY, Deng Cet al., 2020, Business model innovation in China: Digging out new-to-the-world features

There is a widespread perception that Chinese companies are not good at creating novel products and services. But in the arenas of digital businesses, Chinese companies have become highly successful. Thus, we take business model innovation as an entry point to dig out the reasons behind the success. We analyzed 137 suggested innovative business models in detail to investigate new-to-the-world features, yielding an overview of business model innovation in China. Based on these cases, we propose a theoretical framework to show how innovative features can prompt successful BMI. We summarize the lessons to be learned from BMI in China.

Conference paper

Markman GD, Gianiodis P, Tyge Payne G, Tucci C, Filatotchev I, Kotha R, Gedajlovic Eet al., 2019, The who, where, what, how and when of market entry, Journal of Management Studies, Vol: 56, Pages: 1241-1259, ISSN: 0022-2380

This introductory, along with the eight articles contained within this Special Issue, highlights and brings greater clarity to entrant‐incumbent interactions and to firm movement – when entrants traverse market territories for the creation and/or delivery of offerings, where ‘markets’ include service or product categories, technology or resource spaces, industries, sectors and/or geographies. Collectively, this Special Issues explains that firm movement across market boundaries is highly consequential, influencing resource‐capability mixes inside firms, interfirm relations, market logic and industry value chains, and of course, people, communities and even nations. Specifically, we develop a field‐wide perspective of market entry by expanding on the framework of market entry that Zachary and his colleagues developed (Zachary et al., 2015) – i.e., the who (players such as incumbents, entrants, suppliers, etc.), when (the timing and sequence of entry), how (the strategy, resources, capabilities, etc.), where (the space of entry) and what (product, service, business model, etc.) – to include two additional categories: complements (networks, platforms, ecosystems) and non‐market elements (government, political, social and cultural arrangements). We also summarize the eight highly diverse and insightful articles that make this Special Issue, and conclude with a discussion to highlight foundational questions that point to new directions in future research in this field. In sum, we hope to inspire scholars to go beyond counting outcomes (e.g., entry/exit rates, or profiling successful versus unsuccessful entrants), to consider contexts, processes and contingencies (e.g., cost, time, collaboration, competition, interfirm relations, etc.) and to discover boundary conditions that inform a theory of market entry.

Journal article

Tucci C, Mueller J, Christianson M, Whiteman G, Bamberger Pet al., 2019, DISCOVERING THE DISCOVERIES: WHAT AMD AUTHORS' VOICES CAN TELL US, ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT DISCOVERIES, Vol: 5, Pages: 209-216

Journal article

Misuraca G, Tucci C, Liu SM, 2019, HICSS2019-Mini Track on Digital Social Innovation, 52ndHawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), Publisher: HICSS, Pages: 2942-2943

Conference paper

Han S, Hasan S, Tucci C, 2019, Information Technology and the Cost of Bank Loans: An Empirical Investigation, 52ndHawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), Publisher: HICSS, Pages: 6619-6627

Conference paper

Tucci C, Viscusi G, Gautschi H, 2018, Translating science into business innovation: the case of open food and nutrition data hackathons, Frontiers in Nutrition, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 2296-861X

In this article, we explore the use of hackathons and open data in corporations' open innovation portfolios, addressing a new way for companies to tap into the creativity and innovation of early-stage startup culture, in this case applied to the food and nutrition sector. We study the first Open Food Data Hackdays, held on 10–11 February 2017 in Lausanne and Zurich. The aim of the overall project that the Hackdays event was part of was to use open food and nutrition data as a driver for business innovation. We see hackathons as a new tool in the innovation manager's toolkit, a kind of live crowdsourcing exercise that goes beyond traditional ideation and develops a variety of prototypes and new ideas for business innovation. Companies then have the option of working with entrepreneurs and taking some the ideas forward.

Journal article

Flores M, Maklin D, Golob M, Al-Ashaab A, Tucci Cet al., 2018, Awareness towards industry 4.0: Key enablers and applications for internet of things and Big Data, 19th IFIP Working Conference on Virtual Enterprises (PRO-VE 2018), Publisher: Springer Verlag, Pages: 377-386, ISSN: 1868-4238

The fourth Industrial revolution promises to increase productivity, flexibility and automation of internal business processes integrating value chains and supporting companies to design and offer novel services based on the availability of data enabled by different technologies. As a result, companies are investing great efforts to understand in which way Industry 4.0 technologies could be deployed to leverage their current operations and deliver a more competitive value proposition to existing and new customers. In this context, the objectives of this paper are: (1) to provide the findings from a research project which aimed to capture the awareness from companies about Industry 4.0, (2) identify which are the key enablers for the successful implementation of Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data and (3) propose further suggestions about research needed to facilitate the development Collaborative Networks towards Industry 4.0.

Conference paper

Flores M, Maklin D, Ingram B, Golob M, Tucci C, Hoffmeier Aet al., 2018, Towards a sustainable innovation process: integrating lean and sustainability principles, IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems (APMS), Publisher: Springer-Verlag Berlin, Pages: 34-42, ISSN: 1868-4238

Many companies are heavily investing resources to innovate faster and smarter in order to gain or retain a competitive advantage. Nevertheless, defining and deploying a sustainable innovation vision still represents a challenge to most companies, as a deep change of mindset is required to reflect going beyond the design, development, production and distribution of new products, to also consider their disposal, recycling or reuse, as part of their end-to-end product life cycle. Therefore, this paper aims to: (1) highlight the relevance of including lean and sustainability principles in the early design and conceptualization phases, (2) explain how lean and sustainability can bring benefits when applied as an integrated system considering three axes: the economic, the social and the environmental, and (3) share a case study providing insights of a successful application.

Conference paper

Flores M, Golob M, Maklin D, Herrera M, Tucci C, Al-Ashaab A, Williams L, Encinas A, Martinez V, Zaki M, Sosa L, Pineda KFet al., 2018, How Can Hackathons Accelerate Corporate Innovation?, IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems (APMS), Publisher: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, Pages: 167-175, ISSN: 1868-4238

Conference paper

Baglieri D, Baldi F, Tucci CL, 2018, University technology transfer office business models: One size does not fit all, Technovation, Vol: 76-77, Pages: 51-63, ISSN: 0166-4972

Technology transfer processes enable universities to increase their positive impact on society by pursuing their entrepreneurial mission in several ways. By analyzing quantitative and qualitative data collected in a longitudinal dataset of 60 U.S. universities during the period 2002–2012, this article identifies four types of technology transfer business models that may generate economic and non-economic linkages that need to be evaluated. Findings reveal that business models that leverage high-quality research (i.e., catalyst) and startup creation (i.e., orchestrator of local buzz) are associated with higher economic performance. This study contributes to the emergent literature on university business models and provides suggestions to policymakers to incorporate a business model typology in university evaluation programs.

Journal article

Bastian B, Richter UH, Tucci CL, 2018, Natural resources and the resourcebased view, Managing Natural Resources: Organizational Strategy, Behaviour and Dynamics, Pages: 186-210, ISBN: 9781786435712

Book chapter

Tucci CL, Afuah A, Viscusi G, 2018, Creating and capturing value through crowdsourcing, ISBN: 9780198816225

Examples of the value that can be created and captured through crowdsourcing go back to at least 1714, when the UK used crowdsourcing to solve the Longitude Problem, obtaining a solution that would enable the UK to become the dominant maritime force of its time. Today, Wikipedia uses crowds to provide entries for the world’s largest and free encyclopedia. Partly fueled by the value that can be created and captured through crowdsourcing, interest in researching the phenomenon has been remarkable. For example, the Best Paper Awards in 2012 for a record-setting three journals-the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Product Innovation Management, and Academy of Management Perspectives-were about crowdsourcing. In spite of the interest in crowdsourcing-or perhaps because of it-research on the phenomenon has been conducted in different research silos within the fields of management (from strategy to finance to operations to information systems), biology, communications, computer science, economics, political science, among others. In these silos, crowdsourcing takes names such as broadcast search, innovation tournaments, crowdfunding, community innovation, distributed innovation, collective intelligence, open source, crowdpower, and even open innovation. The book aims to assemble papers from as many of these silos as possible since the ultimate potential of crowdsourcing research is likely to be attained only by bridging them. The papers provide a systematic overview of the research on crowdsourcing from different fields based on a more encompassing definition of the concept, its difference for innovation, and its value for both the private and public sectors.

Book

Tucci CL, Afuah A, Viscusi G, 2018, Introduction to creating and capturing value through crowdsourcing, Creating and Capturing Value through Crowdsourcing, Pages: 1-8, ISBN: 9780198816225

Partly fueled by the pervasiveness of information technologies that facilitate the broadcasting of problems to crowds, and by anecdotal examples of phenomenally high-value solutions from outsourcing some problems to crowds, growth in the research and practice of crowdsourcing for problem solving has been remarkable. Research streams have been emerging in different disciplines. In this introduction to the volume, we introduce twelve chapters by scholars-from different disciplines-who explore interesting topics from some of these emerging research streams. The chapters fall into different groups distinguished by whether value is created and captured via tournament-based, collaboration-based, or hybrid crowdsourcing activities. We also offer future research directions and conclusions.

Book chapter

Viscusi G, Tucci CL, 2018, Three’s a crowd?, Creating and Capturing Value through Crowdsourcing, Pages: 39-57, ISBN: 9780198816225

According to conventional wisdom on crowdsourcing, the number of people defines the crowd and maximization of this number is often assumed to be the goal of any crowdsourcing exercise. However, some structural characteristics of the crowd might be more important than the sheer number of participants. These characteristics include (1) the growth rate and its attractiveness to members, (2) equality among members, (3) density within provisional boundaries, (4) goal orientation of the crowd, and (5) “seriality” of the interactions between members. Therefore, a typology is proposed that may allow managers to position their companies’ initiatives among four strategic types for driving innovation: crowd crystals, online communities, closed crowds, and open crowds. Incumbent companies may prefer closed and controlled access to the crowd, limiting the potential for gaining results and insights from fully open crowd-driven innovation initiatives. Thus, the effects on industries and organizations by open crowds are still to be explored.

Book chapter

Bastian BL, Tucci CL, 2017, Entrepreneurial advice sources and their antecedents Venture stage, innovativeness and internationalization, JOURNAL OF ENTERPRISING COMMUNITIES-PEOPLE AND PLACES IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY, Vol: 11, Pages: 214-236, ISSN: 1750-6204

Journal article

Massa L, Tucci CL, Afuah A, 2017, A critical assessment of business model research, The Academy of Management Annals, Vol: 11, Pages: 73-104, ISSN: 1941-6067

Ever since the Internet boom of the mid-1990s, firms have been experimenting with new ways of doing business and achieving their goals, which has led to a branching of the scholarly literature on business models. Three interpretations of the meaning and function of “business models” have emerged from the management literature: (1) business models as attributes of real firms, (2) business models as cognitive/linguistic schemas, and (3) business models as formal conceptual representations of how a business functions. Relatedly, a provocative debate about the relationship between business models and strategy has fascinated many scholars. We offer a critical review of this now vast business model literature with the goal of organizing the literature and achieving greater understanding of the larger picture in this increasingly important research area. In addition to complementing and extending prior reviews, we also aim at a second and more important contribution: We aim at identifying the reasons behind the apparent lack of agreement in the interpretation of business models, and the relationship between business models and strategy. Whether strategy scholars consider business model research a new field may be due to the fact that the business model perspective may be challenging the assumptions of traditional theories of value creation and capture by focusing on value creation on the demand side and supply side, rather than focusing on value creation on the supply side only as these theories have done. We conclude by discussing how the business model perspective can contribute to research in different fields, offering future research directions.

Journal article

Ettlie JE, Tucci C, Gianiodis PT, 2017, Trust, integrated information technology and new product success, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF INNOVATION MANAGEMENT, Vol: 20, Pages: 406-427, ISSN: 1460-1060

Journal article

Tucci CL, Chesbrough H, Piller F, West Jet al., 2016, When do firms undertake open, collaborative activities? Introduction to the special section on open innovation and open business models, INDUSTRIAL AND CORPORATE CHANGE, Vol: 25, Pages: 283-288, ISSN: 0960-6491

Journal article

Massa L, Tucci C, Viscusi G, 2016, First international workshop on business model dynamics and information systems engineering (BumDISE 2016): Preface, ISBN: 9783319395630

Book

Tucci CL, Poulin D, 2015, Introduction to the special issue on electronic government: investment in communities, firms, technologies and infrastructure, ELECTRONIC COMMERCE RESEARCH, Vol: 15, Pages: 301-302, ISSN: 1389-5753

Journal article

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