Imperial College London

Dr Caroline Alexander

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer; Adjunct Reader
 
 
 
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Contact

 

caroline.alexander

 
 
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Location

 

Department of PhysiotherapyCharing Cross HospitalCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Current projects

Fatigue in people who are hypermobile

We are recruiting two groups of people. Healthy individuals are being compared to people with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome. We are comparing the brain's ability to withstand fatigue as well as the muscle's ability to withstand fatigue between the two groups. 

 

Rate of change of muscle strength of people who are hypermobile

We are recruiting three groups of people who have knee pain; people who are particularly flexible and have Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, people who are particularly flexible but do not have the syndrome and people who have average flexibility. We are asking them to do specific exercises over a 16 week period and we are comparing the rate at which they strengthen their knee muscle (Quadriceps). 

 

Cortical and reflex control of Quadriceps

We are recruiting three groups; people with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome and knee pain, people who are flexible but not in pain and people with average flexibility. We are comparing their corticospinal and reflex control of the Quadriceps muscle.

 

Kinematics and kinetics of knee movement in people who are hypermobile

We are recruiting different groups of people who are flexible and people who have average flexibility in order to examine movement patterns and forces through the knee (http://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/a.bates13).


Cortical control of shoulder muscles

We are recruiting healthy people to investigate the brain's ability to control shoulder muscles

Collaborators

Dr A Shaheen, University of Surrey, Scapula movement

Research Staff

To,M

Research Student Supervision

Bates,A, Kinematics and kinetics of the knee in people with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome.

Kennedy,D, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: an investigation of the impact of neuropathic pain and somatosensory phenotype on postoperative outcome

Woodbridge,H, When should clinicians start early mobilisation on intensive care? Exploring the barriers to early mobilisation and developing tools to study the safety of mobilisation of Intensive Care Unit patients.