Imperial College London

MrColinBicknell

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 6428colin.bicknell

 
 
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Location

 

1020Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

176 results found

Archer S, Pinto A, Vuik S, Bicknell C, Faiz O, Byrne B, Johnston M, Skapinakis P, Athanasiou T, Vincent C, Darzi Aet al., 2018, Surgery, Complications, and Quality of Life: A Longitudinal Cohort Study Exploring the Role of Psychosocial Factors., Ann Surg

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether psychosocial factors moderate the relationship between surgical complications and quality of life (QoL). BACKGROUND: Patients who experience surgical complications have significantly worse postoperative QoL than patients with an uncomplicated recovery. Psychosocial factors, such as coping style and level of social support influence how people deal with stressful events, but it is unclear whether they affect QoL following a surgical complication. These findings can inform the development of appropriate interventions that support patients postoperatively. METHODS: This is a longitudinal cohort study; data were collected pre-op, 1 month post-op, 4 months post-op, and 12 months post-op. A total of 785 patients undergoing major elective gastrointestinal, vascular, or cardiothoracic surgery who were recruited from 28 National Health Service sites in England and Scotland took part in the study. RESULTS: Patients who experience major surgical complications report significantly reduced levels of physical and mental QoL (P < 0.05) but they make a full recovery over time. Findings indicate that a range of psychosocial factors such as the use of humor as a coping style and the level of health care professional support may moderate the impact of surgical complications on QoL. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical complications alongside other sociodemographic and psychosocial factors contribute to changes in QoL; the results from this exploratory study suggest that interventions that increase the availability of healthcare professional support and promote more effective coping strategies before surgery may be useful, particularly in the earlier stages of recovery where QoL is most severely compromised. However, these relationships should be further explored in longitudinal studies that include other types of surgery and employ rigorous recruitment and follow-up procedures.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chi W, Liu J, Rafii-Tari H, Riga C, Bicknell C, Yang G-Zet al., 2018, Learning-based endovascular navigation through the use of non-rigid registration for collaborative robotic catheterization, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED RADIOLOGY AND SURGERY, Vol: 13, Pages: 855-864, ISSN: 1861-6410

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Judah G, Darzi A, Vlaev I, Gunn L, King D, King D, Valabhji J, Bicknell Cet al., 2018, Financial disincentives? A three-armed randomised controlled trial of the effect of financial Incentives  in Diabetic Eye Assessment  by Screening (IDEAS) trial., Br J Ophthalmol

OBJECTIVE: Conflicting evidence exists regarding the impact of financial incentives on encouraging attendance at medical screening appointments. The primary aim was to determine whether financial incentives increase attendance at diabetic eye screening in persistent non-attenders. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A three-armed randomised controlled trial was conducted in London in 2015. 1051 participants aged over 16 years, who had not attended eye screening appointments for 2 years or more, were randomised (1.4:1:1 randomisation ratio) to receive the usual invitation letter (control), an offer of £10 cash for attending screening (fixed incentive) or a 1 in 100 chance of winning £1000 (lottery incentive) if they attend. The primary outcome was the proportion of invitees attending screening, and a comparative analysis was performed to assess group differences. Pairwise comparisons of attendance rates were performed, using a conservative Bonferroni correction for independent comparisons. RESULTS: 34/435 (7.8%) of control, 17/312 (5.5%) of fixed incentive and 10/304 (3.3%) of lottery incentive groups attended. Participants who received any incentive were significantly less likely to attend their appointment compared with controls (risk ratio (RR)=0.56; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.92). Those in the probabilistic incentive group (RR=0.42; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.98), but not the fixed incentive group (RR=1.66; 95% CI 0.65 to 4.21), were significantly less likely to attend than those in the control group. CONCLUSION: Financial incentives, particularly lottery-based incentives, attract fewer patients to diabetic eye screening than standard invites in this population. Financial incentives should not be used to promote screening unless tested in context, as they may negatively affect attendance rates.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Li MM, Hamady MS, Bicknell CD, Riga CVet al., 2018, Flexible robotic catheters in the visceral segment of the aorta: advantages and limitations., J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino), Vol: 59, Pages: 317-321

Flexible robotic catheters are an emerging technology which provide an elegant solution to the challenges of conventional endovascular intervention. Originally developed for interventional cardiology and electrophysiology procedures, remotely steerable robotic catheters such as the Magellan system enable greater precision and enhanced stability during target vessel navigation. These technical advantages facilitate improved treatment of disease in the arterial tree, as well as allowing execution of otherwise unfeasible procedures. Occupational radiation exposure is an emerging concern with the use of increasingly complex endovascular interventions. The robotic systems offer an added benefit of radiation reduction, as the operator is seated away from the radiation source during manipulation of the catheter. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated reduction in force and frequency of vessel wall contact, resulting in reduced tissue trauma, as well as improved procedural times. Both safety and feasibility have been demonstrated in early clinical reports, with the first robot-assisted fenestrated endovascular aortic repair in 2013. Following from this, the Magellan system has been used to successfully undertake a variety of complex aortic procedures, including fenestrated/branched endovascular aortic repair, embolization, and angioplasty.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Martin G, Patel N, Grant Y, Jenkins M, Gibbs R, Bicknell Cet al., 2018, Antihypertensive medication adherence in chronic type B aortic dissection is an important consideration in the management debate., J Vasc Surg

OBJECTIVE: Early aortic stenting in chronic type B aortic dissection (TBAD) may lead to long-term benefit, although the optimal treatment strategy is hotly debated. A robust comparison to outcomes seen in medically managed patients is challenging as the rate of antihypertensive medication adherence is unknown. The aims of this study were therefore to identify the rate of antihypertensive medication adherence and predictors of adherence in TBAD. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional mixed methods study of patients with TBAD. Medication adherence was assessed by the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale together with an assessment of demographic, behavioral, and psychological variables and disease-specific knowledge. RESULTS: There were 47 patients (mean age, 59 years; 81% male) who were recruited from a tertiary vascular unit. The mean total number of medications taken was 5.8 (2-14), and the mean number of antihypertensive medications was 1.9 (1-6). Of the 47 patients, 20 (43%) reported high levels of medication adherence, 17 (36%) reported moderate adherence, and 10 (21%) reported low adherence. Previous aortic surgery was associated with higher levels of adherence (β = 0.332; P = .03), as was taking a greater number of medications (β = 0.332; P = .026), perceived benefit from treatment (β = 0.486; P < .001), good memory (β = 0.579; P < .001), and low fears of side effects (β = 0.272; P < .014). CONCLUSIONS: Medical management remains the mainstay of treatment in uncomplicated TBAD; however, the majority of patients are poorly adherent to their antihypertensive medications. The merits of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in TBAD are argued, and poor adherence is an important factor in the debate; one cannot robustly compare two strategies when half of a treatment group may not be receiving the stated intervention. To develop an evidence-based treatment strategy for TBAD

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Murray AC, Markar S, Mackenzie H, Baser O, Wiggins T, Askari A, Hanna G, Faiz O, Mayer E, Bicknell C, Darzi A, Kiran RPet al., 2018, An observational study of the timing of surgery, use of laparoscopy and outcomes for acute cholecystitis in the USA and UK, SURGICAL ENDOSCOPY AND OTHER INTERVENTIONAL TECHNIQUES, Vol: 32, Pages: 3055-3063, ISSN: 0930-2794

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Perera AH, Rudarakanchana N, Monzon L, Bicknell CD, Modarai B, Kirmi O, Athanasiou T, Hamady M, Gibbs RGet al., 2018, Cerebral embolization, silent cerebral infarction and neurocognitive decline after thoracic endovascular aortic repair, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 105, Pages: 366-378, ISSN: 0007-1323

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rolls AE, Bicknell CD, Cheshire NJ, Hamady M, Riga CVet al., 2018, The current state of flexide catheter robotics for endovascular interventions., J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino), Vol: 59, Pages: 307-309

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rudarakanchana N, Hamady M, Harris S, Afify E, Gibbs RGJ, Bicknell CD, Jenkins MPet al., 2018, Early outcomes of patients transferred with ruptured suprarenal aneurysm or dissection, ANNALS OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND, Vol: 100, Pages: 316-321, ISSN: 0035-8843

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Weerakkody R, Ross D, Parry DA, Ziganshin B, Vandrovcova J, Gampawar P, Abdullah A, Biggs J, Dumfarth J, Ibrahim Y, Yale Aortic Institute Data and Repository Team, Bicknell C, Field M, Elefteriades J, Cheshire N, Aitman TJet al., 2018, Targeted genetic analysis in a large cohort of familial and sporadic cases of aneurysm or dissection of the thoracic aorta., Genet Med

PurposeThoracic aortic aneurysm/aortic dissection (TAAD) is a disorder with highly variable age of onset and phenotype. We sought to determine the prevalence of pathogenic variants in TAAD-associated genes in a mixed cohort of sporadic and familial TAAD patients and identify relevant genotype-phenotype relationships.MethodsWe used a targeted polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing-based panel for genetic analysis of 15 TAAD-associated genes in 1,025 unrelated TAAD cases.ResultsWe identified 49 pathogenic or likely pathogenic (P/LP) variants in 47 cases (4.9% of those successfully sequenced). Almost half of the variants were in nonsyndromic cases with no known family history of aortic disease. Twenty-five variants were within FBN1 and two patients were found to harbor two P/LP variants. Presence of a related syndrome, younger age at presentation, family history of aortic disease, and involvement of the ascending aorta increased the risk of carrying a P/LP variant.ConclusionGiven the poor prognosis of TAAD that is undiagnosed prior to acute rupture or dissection, genetic analysis of both familial and sporadic cases of TAAD will lead to new diagnoses, more informed management, and possibly reduced mortality through earlier, preclinical diagnosis in genetically determined cases and their family members.Genetics in Medicine advance online publication, 15 March 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2018.27.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chi W, Rafii-Tari H, Payne CJ, Liu J, Riga C, Bicknell C, Yang GZet al., 2017, A learning based training and skill assessment platform with haptic guidance for endovascular catheterization, Pages: 2357-2363, ISSN: 1050-4729

© 2017 IEEE. Increasing demands in endovascular intervention have motivated technical skill training and competency-based measures of performance. However, there are no well-established online metrics for technical skill assessment; few studies have explored operator behavioral patterns from catheter motion and operator hand motions. This paper proposes a platform for active online training and objective assessment of endovascular skills, through learning optimum catheter motions from multiple demonstrations. An ungrounded hand-held haptic device for providing intuitive haptic guidance to novice users based on this learnt information is also proposed. Statistical models are implemented to extract the underlying catheter motion patterns, and utilize them for performance evaluation and haptic guidance. The results show significant improvements in endovascular navigation for inexperienced operators. Finer catheter motions were achieved with the provided haptic guidance. The results suggest that the proposed platform can be integrated into current clinical training setups, and motivate the improvement of endovascular training platforms with better realism.

CONFERENCE PAPER

Desender L, Van Herzeele I, Lachat M, Duchateau J, Bicknell C, Teijink J, Heyligers J, Vermassen Fet al., 2017, A Multicentre Trial of Patient specific Rehearsal Prior to EVAR: Impact on Procedural Planning and Team Performance, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY, Vol: 53, Pages: 354-361, ISSN: 1078-5884

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Desender LM, Van Herzeele I, Rancic Z, Bicknell C, Zairis I, Vermassen FE, Rundback JHet al., 2017, Patient-Specific Simulation of Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Repair: Initial Experience, ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY, Vol: 104, Pages: 336-341, ISSN: 0003-4975

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hamady M, Sharma PM, Patel R, Godfrey AD, Bicknell CDet al., 2017, Hybrid endovascular repair of aneurysmal right-sided aortic arch and Kommerell's diverticulum using a two-vessel branched stent graft: Case report and review of literature., SAGE Open Med Case Rep, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2050-313X

Right-sided aortic arches are rare, affecting approximately 0.1% of the population. They are a result of abnormal development of the primitive aortic arches and may present later in life with later life with aneurysmal expansion of the aberrant left subclavian artery 'Kommerell's diverticulum'. These can be challenging to treat effectively. We report a rare case presenting with mild dysphagia and right-sided aneurysmal aortic arch with aneurysmal aberrant left-sided. The patient underwent hybrid endovascular repair incorporating bilateral carotid-subclavian bypasses and dual-arch-branch endograft placement to the left and right common carotid arteries. Although endovascular approaches have been described, there are no reports of branched endografts in this scenario. Right-sided aneurysmal aortic arch and the aneurysmal aberrant left subclavian artery are rare and represent a significant therapeutic challenge. Endovascular repair in conjunction with extra-anatomical bypass utilising a custom-made branched thoracic endograft is feasible.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Judah G, Darzi A, Vlaev I, Gunn L, King D, King D, Valabhji J, Bishop L, Brown A, Duncan G, Fogg A, Harris G, Tyacke P, Bicknell Cet al., 2017, Incentives in Diabetic Eye Assessment by Screening (IDEAS) trial: a three-armed randomised controlled trial of financial incentives, Health Services and Delivery Research, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-60, ISSN: 2050-4349

Background:The UK national diabetic eye screening (DES) programme invites diabetic patients aged>12 years annually. Simple and cost-effective methods are needed to increase screening uptake. This trialtests the impact on uptake of two financial incentive schemes, based on behavioural economic principles.Objectives:To test whether or not financial incentives encourage screening attendance. Secondarily tounderstand if the type of financial incentive scheme used affects screening uptake or attracts patients witha different sociodemographic status to regular attenders. If financial incentives were found to improveattendance, then a final objective was to test cost-effectiveness.Design:Three-armed randomised controlled trial.Setting:DES clinic within St Mary’s Hospital, London, covering patients from the areas of Kensington,Chelsea and Westminster.Participants:Patients aged≥16 years, who had not attended their DES appointment for≥2 years.Interventions:(1) Fixed incentive–invitation letter and £10 for attending screening; (2) probabilistic(lottery) incentive–invitation letter and 1% chance of winning £1000 for attending screening; and(3) control–invitation letter only.Main outcome measures:The primary outcome was screening attendance. Rates for control versus fixedand lottery incentive groups were compared using relative risk (RR) and risk difference with corresponding95% confidence intervals (CIs).Results:A total of 1274 patients were eligible and randomised; 223 patients became ineligible beforeinvite and 1051 participants were invited (control,n=435; fixed group,n=312; lottery group,n=304).Thirty-four (7.8%, 95% CI 5.29% to 10.34%) control, 17 (5.5%, 95% CI 2.93% to 7.97%) fixed groupand 10 (3.3%, 95% CI 1.28% to 5.29%) lottery group participants attended. Participants offered incentives were 44% less likely to attend screening than controls (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.92). Examining incentivegroups separately, the lottery gr

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lear R, Godfrey AD, Riga C, Norton C, Vincent C, Bicknell CDet al., 2017, The Impact of System Factors on Quality and Safety in Arterial Surgery: A Systematic Review, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY, Vol: 54, Pages: 79-93, ISSN: 1078-5884

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lear R, Godfrey AD, Riga C, Norton C, Vincent C, Bicknell CDet al., 2017, Surgeons' Perceptions of the Causes of Preventable Harm in Arterial Surgery: A Mixed-Methods Study, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY, Vol: 54, Pages: 778-786, ISSN: 1078-5884

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lee S-L, 2017, Examining the use of a novel dynamic endovascular simulator to facilitate intelligent localization and robotic technologies, Vascular-Societies Annual Scientific Meeting, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 16-16, ISSN: 0007-1323

CONFERENCE PAPER

Normahani P, Kwasnicki R, Bicknell C, Allen L, Jenkins MP, Gibbs R, Cheshire N, Darzi A, Riga Cet al., 2017, Wearable Sensor Technology Efficacy in Peripheral Vascular Disease (wSTEP): A Randomized Controlled Trial., Ann Surg

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of using wearable activity monitors (WAMs) in patients with intermittent claudication (IC) within a single-center randomized controlled trial. BACKGROUND: WAMs allow users to set daily activity targets and monitor their progress. They may offer an alternative treatment to supervised exercise programs (SEPs) for patients with IC. METHODS: Thirty-seven patients with IC were recruited and randomized into intervention or control group. The intervention consisted of a feedback-enabled, wrist-worn activity monitor (WAM) in addition to access to SEP. The control group was given access to SEP only. The outcome measures were maximum walking distance (MWD), claudication distance (CD), and quality of life as measured by the VascuQol questionnaire. Participants were assessed upon recruitment, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Patients in the WAM group showed significant improvement in MWD at 3 and 6 months (80-112 m, to 178 m; P < 0.001), which was sustained at 12 months. The WAM group also increased CD (40 vs 110 m; P < 0.001) and VascuQol score (4.7 vs 5.8; P = 0.004). The control group saw a temporary increase in VascuQol score at 6 months (4.5 vs 4.7; P = 0.028), but no other improvements in MWD or CD were observed. Significantly higher improvements in MWD were seen in the WAM group compared with that in the control group at 6 months (82 vs -5 m; P = 0.009, r = 0.47) and 12 months (69 vs 7.5 m; P = 0.011, r = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates the significant, sustained benefit of WAM-led technologies for patients with IC. This potentially resource-sparing intervention is likely to provide a valuable adjunct or alternative to SEP.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Perera AH, Riga CV, Monzon L, Gibbs RG, Bicknell CD, Hamady Met al., 2017, Robotic Arch Catheter Placement Reduces Cerebral Embolization During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR), EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY, Vol: 53, Pages: 362-369, ISSN: 1078-5884

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Perera AH, Riga CV, Monzon L, Gibbs RG, Bicknell CD, Hamady Met al., 2017, Response to Commentary on "Robotic Arch Catheter Placement Reduces Cerebral Embolisation During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR)", EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY, Vol: 54, Pages: 126-127, ISSN: 1078-5884

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rafii-Tari H, Payne CJ, Bicknell C, Kwok K-W, Cheshire NJW, Riga C, Yang G-Zet al., 2017, Objective Assessment of Endovascular Navigation Skills with Force Sensing, ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 45, Pages: 1315-1327, ISSN: 0090-6964

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ramjeeawon A, Sharrock AE, Morbi A, Pettengell C, Bicknell Cet al., 2017, Exploring the effect of a structured debrief on measurable performance outcomes during endovascular surgery simulation, International Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 41-42, ISSN: 0007-1323

CONFERENCE PAPER

Ribe L, Bicknell CD, Gibbs RG, Burfitt N, Jenkins MP, Cheshire N, Hamady Met al., 2017, Long-term results of intra-arterial onyx injection for type II endoleaks following endovascular aneurysm repair, VASCULAR, Vol: 25, Pages: 266-271, ISSN: 1708-5381

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rolls AE, Riga CV, Rahim S, Stoyanov DV, Van Herzeele I, Mikhail G, Hamady M, Cheshire NJ, Bicknell CDet al., 2017, Video motion analysis in live coronary angiography differentiates levels of experience and provides a novel method of skill assessment, EUROINTERVENTION, Vol: 13, Pages: E1460-E1467, ISSN: 1774-024X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bicknell CD, Kiru G, Falaschetti E, Powell JT, Poulter NRet al., 2016, An evaluation of the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor on the growth rate of small abdominal aortic aneurysms: a randomized placebo-controlled trial (AARDVARK), EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 37, Pages: 3213-3221, ISSN: 0195-668X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chang P-L, Rolls A, De Praetere H, Poorten EV, Riga CV, Bicknell CD, Stoyanov Det al., 2016, Robust Catheter and Guidewire Tracking Using B-Spline Tube Model and Pixel-Wise Posteriors, IEEE ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION LETTERS, Vol: 1, Pages: 303-308, ISSN: 2377-3766

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cheung S, Bicknell C, Stoyanov D, Li M, Rahman Ret al., 2016, Robot-Assisted EVAR: Video Motion Analysis in Live Cases, Vascular-Societies Annual Scientific Meeting, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 21-21, ISSN: 0007-1323

CONFERENCE PAPER

Desender LM, Van Herzeele I, Lachat ML, Rancic Z, Duchateau J, Rudarakanchana N, Bicknell CD, Heyligers JMM, Teijink JAW, Vermassen FEet al., 2016, Patient-specific Rehearsal Before EVAR: Influence on Technical and Nontechnical Operative Performance. A Randomized Controlled Trial, ANNALS OF SURGERY, Vol: 264, Pages: 703-709, ISSN: 0003-4932

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Godfrey AD, Riga C, Bicknell C, 2016, 750 preoperative elective aortic-conditioned for failure?, Vascular-Societies Annual Scientific Meeting, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 14-14, ISSN: 0007-1323

CONFERENCE PAPER

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