Imperial College London

DrConnorMyant

Faculty of EngineeringDyson School of Design Engineering

Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

connor.myant Website

 
 
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Location

 

110-12 Prince's GardensSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Additive Manufacturing

3D Printing (3DP) opens up near infinite possibilities in design options with the ability to embed latent functions such as sensing, personalisation and functional structures. This is both an advantage, in terms of design freedom, but also a potential disadvantage in that the expansive design space leads to increased difficulty in finding the optimum solution. Before 3DP becomes a standard commercial manufacturing technique; failure rates, build times and costs must be reduced.  In many industries, the gap between additively manufacturing a prototype and a commercial product, even in small volumes, remains large.  

We hypothesize that one of the limiting factors preventing mass market uptake of 3DP technologies is the current limitations faced in the CAD software. Current tools are not catered around 3DP technologies, in terms of capturing the effects of process parameters and their influence on the final product. Benefits of the technology are only realised with skilled operators and thus there exists a need for deskilled computer aided engineering tools specifically for 3DP technologies.

BIO-LUBRICATION SYSTEMS

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Products which interact with biological systems, such as artificial implants, foods and cosmetics face a variety of design challenges. Many of these challenges are tribological and the performance of the product can often be evaluated by how well it meets these; be it prolonging it's life span through the reduction of wear (Artificial Implants) or altering a sensory response through controlling the friction and operating lubrication mechanisms (Foods and Cosmetics).

CONSUMER SENSORY RESPONSE

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Products which interact with biological systems, such as artificial implants, foods and cosmetics face a variety of design challenges. Many of these challenges are tribological and the performance of the product can often be evaluated by how well it meets these; be it prolonging it's life span through the reduction of wear (Artificial Implants) or altering a sensory response through controlling the friction and operating lubrication mechanisms (Foods and Cosmetics).

HARSH ENVIRONMENTS

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Feel is related to the tribological properties of the interface.  For many consumer products, in particular foods, beverages and topical lotions, how they feel during consumption, or application, is important, otherwise they might not be used despite their health benefits. How these products feel during and after use are critical to consumer choice and acceptability.

The processing of foods and beverages, or the application of topical formulations is a dynamic process. This means their mechanical, rheological and tribological characteristics are intrinsically transient. This creates a challenging design problem; how do we control sensations throughout the product's life span?

This work is developing strategies to capture the dynamic aspects of oral processing or skin cream application. The aim is equip formulators and manufactures with a scientific appreciation for variations in consumer haptic response, improve measurement capabilities of tactile perception and reducing the subjectiveness and reliance upon human panel testing.