Imperial College London

Professor Denis Wright

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences

Emeritus Professor of Pest Management
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1868d.wright

 
 
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Assistant

 

Dr Andrew Tingey +44 (0)20 7594 6617

 
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Location

 

521Sherfield BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Overview

Genetics and mechanisms of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis CRY TOXINS

Genetics and mechanisms of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins in insects. [Collaborative studies with Havana, Rothamsted, Sussex, València]

Cry toxins are the most selective compounds used for insect control, each having a narrow spectrum of activity against members of the Lepidoptera, Diptera or Coleoptera. As spray products, they are valuable components of integrated pest management programmes and organic agriculture. Cry toxins are also the dominant traits expressed in insect resistant GM crops, most notably Bt cotton and Bt maize. Knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of resistance to Bt toxins is essential to the continual development of resistance management.

Application technology for entomopathogenic nematodes

Figure 5: Optimizing distribution of entomopathogenic nematodes in spray droplets (right hand picture shows droplets being released from a spinning disc applicator)Figure 5: Optimizing distribution of entomopathogenic nematodes in spray droplets (right hand picture shows droplets being released from a spinning disc applicator)

Optimizing distribution of entomopathogenic nematodes in spray droplets (right hand picture shows droplets being released from a spinning disc applicator)

Development of robust systems for the application of nematodes against foliar insect pests on protected and field crops. The development of polymer-based formulations and delivery systems specifically designed for nematodes have led to major improvements in their efficacy against leafminer and other pest species.