Imperial College London

DrElaineFuertes

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Imperial College Junior Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7939e.fuertes

 
 
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Location

 

Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Luzak:2017:10.1186/s12931-017-0619-5,
author = {Luzak, A and Fuertes, E and Flexeder, C and Standl, M and von, Berg A and Berdel, D and Koletzko, S and Heinrich, J and Nowak, D and Schulz, H},
doi = {10.1186/s12931-017-0619-5},
journal = {RESPIRATORY RESEARCH},
title = {Which early life events or current environmental and lifestyle factors influence lung function in adolescents? results from the GINIplus & LISAplus studies},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12931-017-0619-5},
volume = {18},
year = {2017}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - BackgroundVarious factors may affect lung function at different stages in life. Since investigations that simultaneously consider several factors are rare, we examined the relative importance of early life, current environmental/lifestyle factors and allergic diseases on lung function in 15-year-olds.MethodsBest subset selection was performed for linear regression models to investigate associations between 21 diverse early life events and current factors with spirometric parameters (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and maximal mid-expiratory flow (FEF25–75)) in 1326 participants of the German GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts. To reduce model complexity, one model for each spirometric parameter was replicated 1000 times in random subpopulations (N = 884). Only those factors that were included in >70% of the replication models were retained in the final analysis.ResultsA higher peak weight velocity and early lung infections were the early life events prevalently associated with airflow limitation and FEF25–75. Current environmental/lifestyle factors at age 15 years and allergic diseases that were associated with lung function were: indoor second-hand smoke exposure, vitamin D concentration, body mass index (BMI) and asthma status. Sex and height captured the majority of the explained variance (>75%), followed by BMI (≤23.7%). The variance explained by early life events was comparatively low (median: 4.8%; range: 0.2–22.4%), but these events were consistently negatively associated with airway function.ConclusionsAlthough the explained variance was mainly captured by well-known factors included in lung function prediction equations, our findings indicate early life and current factors that should be considered in studies on lung health among adolescents.
AU - Luzak,A
AU - Fuertes,E
AU - Flexeder,C
AU - Standl,M
AU - von,Berg A
AU - Berdel,D
AU - Koletzko,S
AU - Heinrich,J
AU - Nowak,D
AU - Schulz,H
DO - 10.1186/s12931-017-0619-5
PY - 2017///
SN - 1465-993X
TI - Which early life events or current environmental and lifestyle factors influence lung function in adolescents? results from the GINIplus & LISAplus studies
T2 - RESPIRATORY RESEARCH
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12931-017-0619-5
UR - http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000405898400002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=1ba7043ffcc86c417c072aa74d649202
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/59128
VL - 18
ER -