Imperial College London

Professor EJ Milner-Gulland

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2509e.j.milner-gulland Website

 
 
//

Location

 

108MunroSilwood Park

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

326 results found

de Lange E, Milner-Gulland EJ, Yim V, Leng C, Phann S, Keane Aet al., 2020, Using mixed methods to understand sensitive wildlife poisoning behaviours in northern Cambodia, Oryx, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 0030-6053

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>In northern Cambodia, threatened wildlife, livestock and people are being poisoned by pesticides deposited in seasonal waterholes. Addressing this critical conservation threat requires understanding the drivers of poisoning behaviours and the social contexts in which they occur. This study across 10 communities in two protected areas aimed to provide a first assessment of this phenomenon. We used the theory of planned behaviour to measure socio-psychological determinants of behaviour and deepened this understanding using informant interviews and focus group discussions. Informants reported that so-called termite poisons, including powerful carbamates, are deliberately deposited at waterholes to catch wildlife for consumption. This method is perceived to be low effort and high efficacy, and perceptions of the health risks vary. Predominant users are young men and children, but it is unclear whether the practice is related to food insecurity. Threatened wildlife species reported as affected include the giant ibis <jats:italic>Pseudibis gigantea</jats:italic> and vulture species. Overall, social norms are strongly negative towards poisoning; 75% of survey respondents perceived negative norms because of impacts on human and livestock health, environmental quality, and risks of legal sanctions. This has led to interventions by local authorities in half of the studied villages. We suggest that future interventions should raise the salience of negative norms by providing a non-conflictual mechanism for community members to participate in monitoring and sanctioning, such as a reporting hotline. Regulatory interventions are also required to control the supply of restricted pesticides.</jats:p>

Journal article

Kuiper T, Massé F, Ngwenya NA, Kavhu B, MandisodzaChikerema RL, MilnerGulland EJet al., 2020, Ranger perceptions of, and engagement with, monitoring of elephant poaching, People and Nature, ISSN: 2575-8314

Journal article

Doughty H, Wright J, Verissimo D, Lee JSH, Oliver K, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2020, Strategic advertising of online news articles as an intervention to influence wildlife product consumers, CONSERVATION SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Vol: 2

Journal article

Oyanedel R, Gelcich S, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2020, A synthesis of (non-)compliance theories with applications to small-scale fisheries research and practice, FISH AND FISHERIES, ISSN: 1467-2960

Journal article

Oyanedel R, Gelcich S, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2020, Motivations for (non-)compliance with conservation rules by small-scale resource users, CONSERVATION LETTERS, ISSN: 1755-263X

Journal article

Short RE, Mussa J, Hill NAO, Rowcliffe M, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2020, Challenging assumptions: the gendered nature of mosquito net fishing and the implications for management, GENDER TECHNOLOGY & DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 24, Pages: 66-88, ISSN: 0971-8524

Journal article

Booth H, Squires D, Milner-Gulland EJ, Booth H, Squires D, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2020, The mitigation hierarchy for sharks: A risk-based framework for reconciling trade-offs between shark conservation and fisheries objectives, FISH AND FISHERIES, Vol: 21, Pages: 269-289, ISSN: 1467-2960

Journal article

Betts J, Young RP, Hilton-Taylor C, Hoffmann M, Rodriguez JP, Stuart SN, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2020, A framework for evaluating the impact of the IUCN Red List of threatened species, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 34, Pages: 632-643, ISSN: 0888-8892

Journal article

Davis KJ, Alfaro-Shigueto J, Arlidge WNS, Burton M, Mangel JC, Mills M, Milner-Gulland EJ, Palma Duque J, Romero-de-Diego C, Gelcich Set al., 2020, Disconnects in global discourses—the unintended consequences of marine mammal protection on small-scale fishers

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Globally, the populations of many marine mammals remain of critical concern after centuries of exploitation and hunting. However, some marine mammal populations (e.g. pinnipeds) have largely recovered from exploitation, and interactions between these species and fisheries—particularly small-scale fisheries—is once again of concern globally. The large scope and widespread scale of interactions highlights the local disconnect between two global policies: marine mammal conservation and small-scale fisheries protection. In this research, we explore these conflicting global policies by assessing the perceptions of coastal small-scale fishers in Peru and Chile regarding their interactions with pinnipeds, including the South American sea lion (<jats:italic>Otaria flavescens</jats:italic>) and South American fur seal (<jats:italic>Arctocephalus australis</jats:italic>). We surveyed 301 gill net fishers and assess perceptions using a best-worst scaling methodology. We find that fishers are chiefly concerned with the increase in pinniped populations, perceive that their interactions with pinnipeds have significantly increased over the past 80 years, and report pinniped-driven catch and income losses ≥ 26 per cent. Surprisingly, fishers do not believe that compensation schemes will resolve this issue—instead they overwhelmingly call for pinniped population culls. The reported number of pinnipeds illegally killed by fishers suggests the potential for large negative impacts on these protected species, and a loss of legitimacy in marine regulation. Collectively, our results portray a sense of marginalisation from fishers’—that global policy treats them as less “important” than marine mammals. Our results highlight the increasing disconnect in global policy, which on one hand seeks to protect threatened marine mammal populations, and on the other seeks to

Journal article

Brittain S, Ngo Bata M, de Ornellas P, Milner-Gulland EJ, Rowcliffe Met al., 2020, Combining local knowledge and occupancy analysis for a rapid assessment of the forest elephant Loxodonta cyclotis in Cameroon's timber production forests, Oryx, Vol: 54, Pages: 90-100, ISSN: 0030-6053

Information on the distribution and abundance of the forest elephant Loxodonta cyclotis is needed to allocate limited resources appropriately and set conservation goals for the species. However, monitoring at large scales in forest habitats is complicated, expensive and time consuming. We investigated the potential of applying interview-based occupancy analysis as a tool for the rapid assessment of the distribution and relative abundance of forest elephants in eastern Cameroon. Using single-season occupancy models, we explored the covariates that affect forest elephant occupancy and detectability, and identified spatial and temporal patterns in population change and occupancy. Quantitative and qualitative socio-demographic data offer additional depth and understanding, placing the occupancy analysis in context and providing valuable information to guide conservation action. Detectability of forest elephants has decreased since 2008, which is consistent with the decline in perceived abundance in occupied sites. Forest elephants occupy areas outside protected areas and outside the known elephant range defined by IUCN. Critical conservation attention is required to assess forest elephant populations and the threats they face in these poorly understood areas. Interview-based occupancy analysis is a reliable and suitable method for a rapid assessment of forest elephant occupancy on a large scale, as a complement to, or the first stage in, a monitoring process.

Journal article

Grace M, Akcakaya HR, Bennett E, Hilton-Taylor C, Long B, Milner-Gulland EJ, Young R, Hoffmann Met al., 2019, Using historical and palaeoecological data to inform ambitious species recovery targets, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 374, ISSN: 0962-8436

Journal article

Smith T, Beagley L, Bull J, Milner-Gulland EJ, Smith M, Vorhies F, Addison PFEet al., 2019, Biodiversity means business: Reframing global biodiversity goals for the private sector, CONSERVATION LETTERS, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1755-263X

Journal article

Beauchamp E, Clements T, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2019, Investigating Perceptions of Land Issues in a Threatened Landscape in Northern Cambodia, SUSTAINABILITY, Vol: 11

Journal article

Castilho LC, De Vleeschouwer KM, Milner-Gulland EJ, Schiavetti Aet al., 2019, Hunting of mammal species in protected areas of the southern Bahian Atlantic Forest, Brazil, ORYX, Vol: 53, Pages: 687-697, ISSN: 0030-6053

Journal article

Dobson ADM, de Lange E, Keane A, Ibbett H, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2019, Integrating models of human behaviour between the individual and population levels to inform conservation interventions, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 374, ISSN: 0962-8436

Journal article

Zhang F, Wang Y, Wang W, Xu N, Wu S, Cugniere L, Wright J, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2019, Halting the release of the pangolin Manis javanica in China, ORYX, Vol: 53, Pages: 411-412, ISSN: 0030-6053

Journal article

Cugniere L, Wright J, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2019, Evidence to action: research to address illegal wildlife trade, Oryx, Vol: 53, Pages: 411-411, ISSN: 0030-6053

Journal article

Dobson ADM, Milner-Gulland EJ, Beale CM, Ibbett H, Keane Aet al., 2019, Detecting deterrence from patrol data, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 33, Pages: 665-675, ISSN: 0888-8892

Journal article

Addison PFE, Bull JW, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2019, Using conservation science to advance corporate biodiversity accountability, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 33, Pages: 307-318, ISSN: 0888-8892

Journal article

Griffiths VF, Bull JW, Baker J, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2019, No net loss for people and biodiversity, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 33, Pages: 76-87, ISSN: 0888-8892

Journal article

Ibbett H, Lay C, Phlai P, Song D, Hong C, Mahood SP, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2019, Conserving a globally threatened species in a semi-natural, agrarian landscape, ORYX, Vol: 53, Pages: 181-191, ISSN: 0030-6053

Journal article

Sawrey B, Copsey J, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2019, Evaluating impacts of training in conservation: a case study in Mauritius, ORYX, Vol: 53, Pages: 117-125, ISSN: 0030-6053

Journal article

Burgass M, Milner-Gulland EJ, Lowdnes J, O'Hara C, Afflerbach J, Halpern Bet al., 2019, A pan-Arctic assessment of the status of marine social-ecological systems, Regional Environmental Change, Vol: 19, Pages: 293-308, ISSN: 1436-3798

Marine social-ecological conditions in the Arctic are rapidly changing. With many transboundary issues, such as shifting ranges of fisheries, biodiversity loss, sea ice retreat, economic development and pollution, greater pan-Arctic assessment and co-management are necessary. We adapted the Ocean Health Index (OHI) to compile pan-Arctic data and evaluate ocean health for nine regions above the Arctic Circle to assess the extent to which pan-Arctic assessment is possible and identify broad social-ecological trends. While the quality and availability of data varied, we assessed and scored nine OHI goals, including the pressures and resilience measures acting upon them. Our results show the Arctic is sustainably delivering a range of benefits to people, but with room for improvement in all goals, particularly tourism, fisheries, and protected places. Successful management of biological resources and short-term positive impacts on biodiversity in response to climate change underlie these high goal scores. The OHI assesses the past and near-term future but does not account for medium- and long-term future risks associated with climate change, highlighting the need for ongoing monitoring, dynamic management, and strong action to mitigate its anticipated effects. A general increase in and standardisation of monitoring is urgently needed in the Arctic. Unified assessments, such as this one, can support national comparisons, data quality assessments, and discussions on the targeting of limited monitoring capabilities at the most pressing and urgent transboundary management challenges, which is a priority for achieving successful Arctic stewardship.

Journal article

Bladon AJ, Mohammed EY, Ali L, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2018, Developing a frame of reference for fisheries management and conservation interventions, FISHERIES RESEARCH, Vol: 208, Pages: 296-308, ISSN: 0165-7836

Journal article

Isaac NJB, Brotherton PNM, Bullock JM, Gregory RD, Boehning-Gaese K, Connor B, Crick HQP, Freckleton RP, Gill JA, Hails RS, Hartikainen M, Hester AJ, Milner-Gulland EJ, Oliver TH, Pearson RG, Sutherland WJ, Thomas CD, Travis JMJ, Turnbull LA, Willis K, Woodward G, Mace GMet al., 2018, Defining and delivering resilient ecological networks: Nature conservation in England, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY, Vol: 55, Pages: 2537-2543, ISSN: 0021-8901

Journal article

Theng M, Glikman JA, Milner-Gulland EJ, 2018, Exploring saiga horn consumption in Singapore, ORYX, Vol: 52, Pages: 736-743, ISSN: 0030-6053

Journal article

Akcakaya HR, Bennett EL, Brooks TM, Grace MK, Heath A, Hedges S, Hilton-Taylor C, Hoffmann M, Keith DA, Long B, Mallon DP, Meijaard E, Milner-Gulland EJ, Rodrigues ASL, Paul Rodriguez J, Stephenson PJ, Stuart SN, Young RPet al., 2018, Quantifying species recovery and conservation success to develop an IUCN Green List of Species, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 32, Pages: 1128-1138, ISSN: 0888-8892

Journal article

Bladon AJ, Mohammed EY, Hossain B, Kibria G, Ali L, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2018, Evaluating the ecological and social targeting of a compensation scheme in Bangladesh., PLoS ONE, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1932-6203

Conservation payments are increasingly advocated as a way to meet both social and ecological objectives, particularly in developing countries, but these payments often fail to reach the 'right' individuals. The Government of Bangladesh runs a food compensation scheme that aims to contribute to hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) conservation by improving the socioeconomic situation of households affected by hilsa sanctuary fishing bans. Analysing data from a household survey of compensation recipients and non-recipients, we identify the current correlates of compensation distribution and explore perceptions of fairness in this distribution. We find that distribution is largely spatial rather than based on the household characteristics that are supposed to determine eligibility for compensation, indicating political influence in the distribution process. We also find the compensation scheme is widely perceived to be unfair, which could be undermining its potential to compensate vulnerable fishers while improving compliance with fishing bans. The spatial distribution of compensation would shift substantially under alternative targeting scenarios that are likely to improve the cost-effectiveness of the scheme, such as targeting those who are most dependent on fishing for their livelihood. This study highlights a challenge for conservation payment schemes that aim to achieve the dual objectives of poverty reduction and ecological sustainability, particularly large-scale public schemes, and suggests that more effective targeting and transparency about the basis of payment distribution are prerequisites for schemes to be both cost-effective and socially acceptable.

Journal article

Sinclair S, Knight A, Milner-Gulland EJ, Smith B, McIntosh E, Vercammen Aet al., 2018, The use and usability of spatial conservation prioritizations, Conservation Letters, ISSN: 1755-263X

Journal article

Arlidge WNS, Bull JW, Addison PFE, Burgass MJ, Gianuca D, Gorham TM, Jacob C, Shumway N, Sinclair SP, Watson JEM, Wilcox C, Milner-Gulland EJet al., 2018, A Global Mitigation Hierarchy for Nature Conservation, BIOSCIENCE, Vol: 68, Pages: 336-347, ISSN: 0006-3568

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00170563&limit=30&person=true