Imperial College London

DrEdgarMeyer

Business School

Casual - Visiting lect, guest spkr, ext. examiner
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7160e.meyer Website

 
 
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Location

 

176Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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39 results found

Naqvi D, Malik A, Al-Zubaidy M, Naqvi F, Tahir A, Tarfiee A, Vara S, Meyer Eet al., 2019, The general practice perspective on barriers to integration between primary and social care: a London, United Kingdom-based qualitative interview study, BMJ Open, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objective: There is an ongoing challenge of effective integration between primary and social care in the United Kingdom; current systems have led to fragmentation of services preventing holistic patient-centred care for vulnerable populations. To improve clinical outcomes and achieve financial efficiencies, the barriers to integration need to be identified and addressed. This study aims to explore the unique perspectives of frontline staff (General Practitioners and Practice Managers) towards these barriers to integration.Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to obtain results.Setting: General Practices within London.Participants: 18 General Practitioners (GPs) and 7 Practice Managers (PMs) based in London with experience of working with social care.Results: The study identified three overarching themes where frontline staff believed problems exist: accessing social services, interprofessional relationships, and infrastructure. Issues with contacting staff from other sectors creates delays in referrals for patient care and perpetuates existing logistical challenges. Likewise, professionals noted a hostile working culture between sectors that has resulted in silo working mentalities. In addition to staff being overworked as well as often inefficient multidisciplinary team meetings, poor relationships across sectors cause a diffusion of responsibility, impacting the speed with which patient requests are responded to. Furthermore, participants identified that a lack of interoperability between Information Systems, lack of pooled budgets and misaligned incentives between managerial staff compound the infrastructural divide between both sectors. Conclusion: In this study, primary care staff identify intangible barriers to integration such as poor interprofessional relationships, in addition to more well-described structural issues such as insufficient funding and difficulty accessing social care. Participants believe educating

Journal article

Tahir A, Al-Zubaidy M, Naqvi D, Tarfiee A, Naqvi F, Malik A, Vara S, Meyer Eet al., 2019, Medical school teaching on interprofessional relationships between primary and social care to enhance communication and integration of care – a pilot study, Advances in Medical Education and Practice, Vol: 2019, Pages: 311-332, ISSN: 1179-7258

BackgroundA pilot study to identify if the delivery of teaching session to medical students would have the potential to enhance communication and a culture of integration between primary and social care, ultimately improving interprofessional relationships between primary and social care.Health and social care integration is a topic of great debate in the developed world and the focus of the upcoming Green Paper by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care in the NHS. There is much uncertainty to how this should be done and is hindered by the various current barriers. The literature identifies that collaborative cultures encourage effective interprofessional relationships and that communication is vital to integration of primary and social care and should be established early in medical training. Materials and Method:The GMC’s Outcomes for Graduates and Imperial College School of Medicine curriculum were reviewed out to identify outcomes relating to inter-professional relationships between primary and social care. The relevant year group was surveyed to identify if the learning objective was delivered.In order to determine if delivery of a teaching session on nurturing interprofessional relationships between primary and social care would be effective, it was delivered to early clinical years to measure benefits as a pilot study. This was devised of case based scenarios derived from learning objectives developed with experienced health care professionals. A survey was administered before and after the teaching session to determine if the students felt they had improved with respect to the learning objectives. Results:The initial survey identified the majority of students found the learning objectives were not delivered. The teaching session found a statistically significant improvement in confidence to nurture interprofessional relationships between primary and social care.Conclustion:Effective interprofessional relationships between primary and social

Journal article

Malik A, Naqvi F, Naqvi D, Al-Zubaidy M, Vara S, Tarfiee A, Tahir A, Meyer Eet al., 2018, Qualitative Interview Study of Primary Health and Social Care Professionals’ Perceptions and Experiences of Barriers to Effective Integrated Care for Elderly Patients in London, European Association of Hospital Manager Congress

Conference paper

Meyer E, 2018, Teamwork – What does it mean and how does it work?, Principles of Interprofessional Learning, Editors: Oshima, Pages: 94-112

Book chapter

Meyer E, 2017, Management, Business and Leadership in Medicine, Making the Most of Medical School The Alternative Guide, Editors: Barnett-Vanes, Publisher: CRC Press, ISBN: 9781138196551

This concise guide to medical school offers an alternative path to developing a diverse set of academic and professional skills for a successful career in medicine.

Book chapter

Ashleigh MJ, Meyer E, 2015, Deepening the understanding of trust: Combining repertory grid and narrative to explore the uniqueness of trust, Handbook of Research Methods on Trust: Second Edition, Pages: 178-188, ISBN: 9781782547402

Book chapter

Meyer E, Lees A, 2013, Learning to Collaborate: An Application of Activity Theory to Interprofessional Learning Across Children's Services, Social Work Education, Vol: 32, Pages: 662-684, ISSN: 0261-5479

This paper investigates the pedagogy of a continuing professional development (CPD) programme to develop interprofessional learning (IPL) and collaborative practice for professionals across children's services, using a framework underpinned by Activity Theory. The aim of the study was to establish which pedagogical features enabled successful interprofessional learning and subsequent changes in collaborative, interprofessional practice. Activity Theory was used as a theoretical framework to analyse and identify the ways in which pedagogy impacts upon the development of collaborative practice. The qualitative study found that pedagogies designed to harness the 'multi-voicedness' of activity systems and the contradictions of multi-disciplinary practice can be used to inspire learning and practice change. From our analysis, 'community' and 'division of labour' were important contextual influences on the learning process. We propose that the ideas underpinning Activity Theory are useful guiding principles when looking at the design of CPD that aims to build collaborative, multi-disciplinary practice across agencies and professionals in children's services. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Journal article

Lees A, Meyer E, Rafferty J, 2013, From Menzies Lyth to Munro: The problem of managerialism, British Journal of Social Work, Vol: 43, Pages: 542-558, ISSN: 0045-3102

This is a theoretical discussion paper that applies concepts from Menzies Lyth's seminal study on the organisation of the nursing service within a London general teaching hospital to the current context of child protection social work. Menzies Lyth argued that, in the absence of constructive outlets for work-related anxiety and emotion, prescriptive rules and working procedures had developed within the nursing service, as a way to defend against the anxiety inherent in the nursing task. Drawing on this analysis, and with reference to the findings of the Munro Review of child protection and other academic literature, this paper argues that prescriptive and tightly defined risk and performance management techniques have developed within the child protection system in an attempt to defend against the uncertainties of cases, fears of making the wrong decision and of public criticism. Unexpected consequences of the managerialist approach within child protection, highlighted by the Munro Review, are compared to the 'secondary anxieties' identified in Menzies Lyth's research. Recommendations made by Munro and the Social Work Reform Board for more supportive and containing contexts for child protection social work are also discussed. © The Author 2011.

Journal article

Siddiq K, Meyer E, Ashleigh M, 2013, What is the Impact of Authentic Leadership on Leader Accountability in a Non-profit Context, THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT, LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE

Conference paper

Saltrese A, Meyer E, Craddock D, 2012, Informal Learning experiences of people case managing clients with traumatic brain injury, Inernational Brain Injury Association 9th World Congress

Conference paper

Lees A, Meyer E, Rafferty J, 2012, How can organisations support the anxieties of information sharing, Social Work Development 2012

Conference paper

Meyer E, Ashleigh M, 2012, Deepening the understanding of trust: combining Repertory Grid and Narrative to explore the uniqueness of trust, Handbook of Research Methods on Trust, Editors: Lyon, Moellering, Saunders, Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing, ISBN: 9780857932013

Book chapter

Lees A, Meyer E, 2011, Theoretically speaking: use of a communities of practice framework to describe and evaluate interprofessional education., J Interprof Care, Vol: 25, Pages: 84-90

This article uses Wenger's (1998) theory of communities of practice, and in particular his learning design framework, to describe and evaluate the pedagogy of one interprofessional continuing professional development (CPD) programme for health, education and social care professionals. The article presents findings from 27 post-intervention interviews conducted 12 months after the CPD. Key pedagogic features of small group working, action planning, facilitation, continued independent learning and 'safe' learning environment were found to provide facilities for 'engagement', 'imagination' and 'alignment' (Wenger, 1998), with the use of task-focused small group work particularly appreciated by participants. Problems of falling attendance and marginalisation are discussed using Wenger's concept of 'identification/negotiability'. It is suggested that careful selection of delegates and provision of sufficient organisational support may mitigate such problems.

Journal article

Baden D, Meyer E, Tonne M, 2011, Which types of strategic corporate philanthropy lead to higher moral capital?, Annual Conference of the International Association for Business and Society

Conference paper

Clarke N, Higgs M, Meyer E, 2011, A study of culture change, A Study of Culture Change, Publisher: CIPD

Report

Wintrup J, Meyer E, James E, 2009, When Higher education takes place in the workplace, 2nd International Conference on Education, Economy and Society

Conference paper

Meyer E, Lees A, 2009, From Interprofessional Education to Integrated Working, 2nd International Conference EIPEN

Conference paper

Wang JK, Meyer E, 2009, Team Cohesiveness and Leadership in the Development of a Knowledge Sharing Atmosphere, 9th International Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organisations

Conference paper

Meyer E, Ashleigh M, Hardcastle D, 2009, Enabling Contextualised Leadership: Reconceptualising Leadership for (Public Sector) Organisations, 9th International Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organisations

Conference paper

Wintrup J, Foskett R, Meyer E, 2008, Work-based Learning and Student Agency: Developing Strategic Learners, 3rd WLE Mobile Learning Symposium: Mobile Learning Cultures across Education, Work and Leisure. Institute of Education

Conference paper

Payler J, Meyer E, Humphris D, 2008, Pedagogy for interprofessional education – what do we know and how can we evaluate it?, Learning in Health and Social Care, Vol: 7, Pages: 64-78, ISSN: 1473-6853

Journal article

Pugh T, Meyer E, Wintrup J, 2008, Work-based Learning: Creating Capacity for Workforce Redesign; workshop, ASET Annual Conference

Conference paper

Ashleigh M, Hardcastle D, Meyer E, 2007, The 8 Cs if Leadership – A Model of Leadership Delivery, 9th International Conference on Human Resource Development Research and Practice across Europe

Conference paper

Meyer E, Lees A, Humphris D, Connell NADet al., 2007, Opportunities and barriers to successful learning transfer: impact of critical care skills training., J Adv Nurs, Vol: 60, Pages: 308-316, ISSN: 0309-2402

AIM: This paper is a report of a study to assess the impact on nursing practice of critical care skills training for ward-based nurses. BACKGROUND: Following a government review in the UK of adult critical care provision, new ways of working were advocated to ensure that critical care services depended on the needs of the patient, not their location in the hospital. A re-conceptualization beyond service provision in high dependency units and intensive care units was required in order to deliver an integrated service. This has ramifications for training requirements. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were used to explore perceived learning and learning transfer from a range of courses. The data were collected from course attendees (n = 47) and line-managers (n = 19) across two sites between 2005 and 2006. FINDINGS: Learning was closely associated with the clinical application of new skills and knowledge. Commonly, course attendees and line-managers quoted increased knowledge and confidence, better assessment skills and improved interprofessional working. Time with competency assessors, availability of expanding roles, and supernumerary time were key factors for successful learning transfer. Barriers were financial pressures on hospitals, lack of perceived relevance of the course to staff or nursing practice, and lack of time to practice skills or work with clinical skills facilitators. CONCLUSION: Course design should be a collaborative activity between education providers and commissioners to ensure the impact of training on practice. Relevance of material, time to practise skills and new learning, and organizational, rather than merely individual, support are essential for successful training interventions.

Journal article

Payler J, Meyer E, Humphris D, 2007, Theorizing interprofessional pedagogic evaluation: framework for evaluating the impact of interprofessional continuing professional development on practice change, Learning in Health and Social Care, Vol: 6, Pages: 156-169, ISSN: 1473-6853

Journal article

Meyer E, Payler J, Humphris D, 2007, Driving Change for Children and Families: An example of an interprofessional CPD programme, 9th Joint Social Work and Education Conference

Conference paper

Klein JH, Connell NAD, Meyer E, 2007, Operational research practice as storytelling, Journal of the Operational Research Society, Vol: 58, Pages: 1535-1542, ISSN: 0160-5682

This paper considers the role of storytelling in operational research (OR) practice. We review the debate on successful OR practice, and adopt the perspective of OR as a process in which OR analysts seek to persuade their clients by means of changing client knowledge. We introduce storytelling in the context of OR practice, and argue that there are two important types of OR story: the story of the content of an OR model and the story of the intervention that generated the model of which the content story can be seen as a sub-plot. We illustrate these ideas with some examples from past practice. We discuss further the nature of OR intervention as story, and consider performative aspects of stories. We relate the use of storytelling in OR practice to the broader area of organizational narrative engineering: the systematic and deliberate use of storytelling perspectives to bring about change within organizations. We consider the evaluation of the potential benefits of storytelling within organizations. The paper offers a contribution that is both descriptivereflecting on the ways in which OR practice might be seen as storytellingand prescriptiveoffering some practical guidance to those keen to apply storytelling as an OR approach. © 2007 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Meyer E, Ashleigh M, Jones G, George Jet al., 2007, Contemporary Management: European Edition, Publisher: McGraw-Hill, ISBN: 9780077111151

Book

Meyer E, Connell C, Humphris D, 2006, Leadership Development: Applying New Learning in an Organisational Context, International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, Vol: 2, Pages: 21-33, ISSN: 1747-9886

Journal article

Wang JK, Ashleigh M, Meyer E, 2006, Knowledge sharing and team trustworthiness: It's all about social ties!, Knowledge Management Research and Practice, Vol: 4, Pages: 175-186, ISSN: 1477-8238

This paper empirically examines knowledge sharing within innovation teams and explores the relationship between knowledge sharing and trust. This relationship has generally been identified in the literature as an important aspect of knowledge management. However, its pertinence to knowledge transfer within and between teams is less obvious. The case study based on four information technology R&D teams in Taiwan suggests that trust between a knowledge holder and a receiver may not exist. In fact, it can be connected by a mediator, although the use of social relationship in which trust is rooted in both host and visitor's trust of the mediator. Thus, trust may be substituted by the social relationship in certain specific contexts. © 2006 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

Journal article

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