Imperial College London

ProfessorElioRiboli

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Chair in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1913e.riboli Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Julieta Dourado +44 (0)20 7594 3426

 
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Location

 

152Medical SchoolSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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1048 results found

Agudo A, Cayssials V, Bonet C, Tjønneland A, Overvad K, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Affret A, Fagherazzi G, Katzke V, Schübel R, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, La Vecchia C, Palli D, Grioni S, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Panico S, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Peeters PH, Weiderpass E, Skeie G, Nøst TH, Lasheras C, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Amiano P, Chirlaque M-D, Ardanaz E, Ohlsson B, Dias JA, Nilsson LM, Myte R, Khaw K-T, Perez-Cornago A, Gunter M, Huybrechts I, Cross AJ, Tsilidis K, Riboli E, Jakszyn Pet al., 2018, Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study., Am J Clin Nutr, Vol: 107, Pages: 607-616

Background: Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. Objective: We assessed the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of gastric carcinoma, overall and for the 2 major subsites: cardia cancers and noncardia cancers. Design: A total of 476,160 subjects (30% men, 70% women) from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were followed for 14 y, during which 913 incident cases of gastric carcinoma were identified, including 236 located in the cardia, 341 in the distal part of the stomach (noncardia), and 336 with overlapping or unknown tumor site. The dietary inflammatory potential was assessed by means of an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD), calculated with the use of 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory scores. The association between the ISD and gastric cancer risk was estimated by HRs and 95% CIs calculated by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for confounders. Results: The inflammatory potential of the diet was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The HR (95% CI) for each increase in 1 SD of the ISD were 1.25 (1.12, 1.39) for all gastric cancers, 1.30 (1.06, 1.59) for cardia cancers, and 1.07 (0.89, 1.28) for noncardia cancers. The corresponding values for the highest compared with the lowest quartiles of the ISD were 1.66 (1.26, 2.20), 1.94 (1.14, 3.30), and 1.07 (0.70, 1.70), respectively. Conclusions: Our results suggest that low-grade chronic inflammation induced by the diet may be associated with gastric cancer risk. This pattern seems to be more consistent for gastric carcinomas located in the cardia than for those located in the distal stomach. This study is listed on the ISRCTN registry as ISRCTN12136108.

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Andersen V, Chan S, Luben R, Khaw K-T, Olsen A, Tjonneland A, Kaaks R, Grip O, Bergmann MM, Boeing H, Hultdin J, Karling P, Overvad K, Oldenburg B, Opstelten J, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Carbonnel F, Racine A, Key T, Masala G, Palli D, Tumino R, Trichopoulou A, Riboli E, Hart Aet al., 2018, Fibre intake and the development of inflammatory bowel disease: A European prospective multi-centre cohort study (EPIC-IBD), JOURNAL OF CROHNS & COLITIS, Vol: 12, Pages: 129-136, ISSN: 1873-9946

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Assi N, Thomas DC, Leitzmann M, Stepien M, Chajès V, Philip T, Vineis P, Bamia C, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Sandanger TM, Molinuevo A, Boshuizen HC, Sundkvist A, Kühn T, Travis RC, Overvad K, Riboli E, Gunter MJ, Scalbert A, Jenab M, Ferrari P, Viallon Vet al., 2018, Are Metabolic Signatures Mediating the Relationship between Lifestyle Factors and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk? Results from a Nested Case-Control Study in EPIC., Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev

Background: The "meeting-in-the-middle" (MITM) is a principle to identify exposure biomarkers that are also predictors of disease. The MITM statistical framework was applied in a nested case-control study of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), where healthy lifestyle index (HLI) variables were related to targeted serum metabolites.Methods: Lifestyle and targeted metabolomic data were available from 147 incident HCC cases and 147 matched controls. Partial least squares analysis related 7 lifestyle variables from a modified HLI to a set of 132 serum-measured metabolites and a liver function score. Mediation analysis evaluated whether metabolic profiles mediated the relationship between each lifestyle exposure and HCC risk.Results: Exposure-related metabolic signatures were identified. Particularly, the body mass index (BMI)-associated metabolic component was positively related to glutamic acid, tyrosine, PC aaC38:3, and liver function score and negatively to lysoPC aC17:0 and aC18:2. The lifetime alcohol-specific signature had negative loadings on sphingomyelins (SM C16:1, C18:1, SM(OH) C14:1, C16:1 and C22:2). Both exposures were associated with increased HCC with total effects (TE) = 1.23 (95% confidence interval = 0.93-1.62) and 1.40 (1.14-1.72), respectively, for BMI and alcohol consumption. Both metabolic signatures mediated the association between BMI and lifetime alcohol consumption and HCC with natural indirect effects, respectively, equal to 1.56 (1.24-1.96) and 1.09 (1.03-1.15), accounting for a proportion mediated of 100% and 24%.Conclusions: In a refined MITM framework, relevant metabolic signatures were identified as mediators in the relationship between lifestyle exposures and HCC risk.Impact: The understanding of the biological basis for the relationship between modifiable exposures and cancer would pave avenues for clinical and public health interventions on metabolic medi

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Aune D, Feng T, Schlesinger S, Janszky I, Norat T, Riboli Eet al., 2018, Diabetes mellitus, blood glucose and the risk of atrial fibrillation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies., J Diabetes Complications

BACKGROUND: Diabetes and elevated blood glucose have been associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation in a number of epidemiological studies, however, the findings have not been entirely consistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We searched the PubMed and Embase databases for studies of diabetes and blood glucose and atrial fibrillation up to July 18th 2017. Cohort studies were included if they reported relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of atrial fibrillation associated with a diabetes diagnosis, prediabetes or blood glucose. Summary RRs were estimated using a random effects model. RESULTS: Thirty four studies were included in the meta-analysis of diabetes, pre-diabetes or blood glucose and atrial fibrillation. Thirty two cohort studies (464,229 cases, >10,244,043 participants) were included in the analysis of diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation. The summary RR for patients with diabetes mellitus versus patients without diabetes was 1.30 (95% CIs: 1.03-1.66), however, there was extreme heterogeneity, I2 = 99.9%) and evidence of publication bias with Begg's test, p < 0.0001. After excluding a very large and outlying study the summary RR was 1.28 (95% CI: 1.22-1.35, I2 = 90%, n = 31, 249,772 cases, 10,244,043 participants). The heterogeneity was mainly due to differences in the size of the association between studies and the results persisted in a number of subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The summary RR was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.03-1.39, I2 = 30%, n = 4, 2392 cases, 58,547 participants) for the association between prediabetes and atrial fibrillation. The summary RR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04-1.18, I2 = 61%, n = 4) per 20 mg/dl increase of blood glucose in relation to atrial fibrillation (3385 cases, 247,447 participants) and there was no evidence of nonlinearity, pnonlinearity = 0.34. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggest that prediabetes and diabetes

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Aune D, Schlesinger S, Norat T, Riboli Eet al., 2018, Tobacco smoking and the risk of sudden cardiac death: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies., Eur J Epidemiol

Smoking is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease including coronary heart disease and stroke, however, data regarding smoking and sudden cardiac death have not been summarized in a meta-analysis previously. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify this association. We searched the PubMed and Embase databases for studies of smoking and sudden cardiac death up to July 20th 2017. Prospective studies were included if they reported adjusted relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for smoking and sudden cardiac death. Summary RRs were estimated by use of a random effects model. Twelve prospective studies were included. The summary RR was 3.06 (95% CI 2.46-3.82, I2 = 41%, pheterogeneity = 0.12, n = 7) for current smokers and 1.38 (95% CI 1.20-1.60, I2 = 0%, pheterogeneity = 0.55, n = 7) for former smokers compared to never smokers. For four studies using non-current (never + former) smokers as the reference category the summary RR among current smokers was 2.08 (95% CI 1.70-2.53, I2 = 18%, pheterogeneity = 0.30). The results persisted in most of the subgroup analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. These results confirm that smoking increases the risk of sudden cardiac death. Any further studies should investigate in more detail the effects of duration of smoking, number of cigarettes per day, pack-years, and time since quitting smoking and sudden cardiac death.

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Aune D, Schlesinger S, Norat T, Riboli Eet al., 2018, Body mass index, abdominal fatness, and the risk of sudden cardiac death: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies., Eur J Epidemiol

Although overweight and obesity are established risk factors for some types of heart disease including ischemic heart disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation, less is known about the association between adiposity and sudden cardiac death. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to clarify the association between adiposity and risk of sudden cardiac death. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to July 20th 2017. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. The summary RR was 1.16 (95% CI 1.05-1.28, I2 = 68%, n = 14) per 5 unit increment in BMI, and 1.82 (95% CI 1.61-2.07, I2 = 0%, n = 3) per 0.1 unit increase in waist-to-hip ratio, and 1.03 (95% CI 0.93-1.15, I2 = 0%, n = 2) per 10 cm increase in waist circumference. The heterogeneity in the analysis of BMI and sudden cardiac death persisted across most subgroup analyses. The association was stronger among studies with longer follow-up compared to short follow-up and was observed in the European and American studies, but not in the Asian studies. There was a J-shaped association between BMI and sudden cardiac death and the lowest risk was observed in the normal weight range, however, the increased risk with a low BMI was attenuated among studies with a longer duration of follow-up. This meta-analysis suggest an increased risk of sudden cardiac death with increasing BMI and waist-to-hip ratio, however, further studies with stratification for smoking status are needed of waist circumference, weight changes and adiposity at younger ages.

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Butt J, Jenab M, Willhauck-Fleckenstein M, Michel A, Pawlita M, Kyrø C, Tjønneland A, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Carbonnel F, Severi G, Kaaks R, Kühn T, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, la Vecchia C, Karakatsani A, Panico S, Tumino R, Agnoli C, Palli D, Sacerdote C, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Weiderpass E, Sánchez M-J, Bonet Bonet C, Huerta JM, Ardanaz E, Bradbury K, Gunter M, Murphy N, Freisling H, Riboli E, Tsilidis K, Aune D, Waterboer T, Hughes DJet al., 2018, Prospective evaluation of antibody response to Streptococcus gallolyticus and risk of colorectal cancer., Int J Cancer

The gut microbiome is increasingly implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. A subgroup of patients diagnosed with CRC show high antibody responses to Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (SGG). However, it is unclear whether the association is also present pre-diagnostically. We assessed the association of antibody responses to SGG proteins in pre-diagnostic serum samples with CRC risk in a case-control study nested within a prospective cohort. Pre-diagnostic serum samples from 485 first incident CRC cases (mean time between blood draw and diagnosis 3.4 years) and 485 matched controls in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study were analyzed for antibody responses to 11 SGG proteins using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models. Antibody positivity for any of the 11 SGG proteins was significantly associated with CRC risk with 56% positive controls compared to 63% positive cases (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04-1.77). Positivity for two or more proteins of a previously identified SGG 6-marker panel with greater CRC-specificity was also observed among 9% of controls compared to 17% of CRC cases, corresponding to a significantly increased CRC risk (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.44-3.27). In this prospective nested case-control study, we observed a positive association between antibody responses to SGG and CRC development in serum samples taken before evident disease onset. Further work is required to establish the possibly etiological significance of these observations and whether SGG serology may be applicable for CRC risk stratification.

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Dossus L, Franceschi S, Biessy C, Navionis A-S, Travis RC, Weiderpass E, Scalbert A, Romieu I, Tjonneland A, Olsen A, Overvad K, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Bonnet F, Fournier A, Fortner RT, Kaaks R, Aleksandrova K, Trichopoulou A, La Vecchia C, Peppa E, Tumino R, Panico S, Palli D, Agnoli C, Vineis P, Bueno-de-Mesquita HBA, Peeters PH, Skeie G, Zamora-Ros R, Chirlaque M-D, Ardanaz E, Sanchez M-J, Ramon Quiros J, Dorronsoro M, Sandstrom M, Nilsson LM, Schmidt JA, Khaw K-T, Tsilidis KK, Aune D, Riboli E, Rinaldi Set al., 2018, Adipokines and inflammation markers and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: The EPIC study, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 142, Pages: 1332-1342, ISSN: 0020-7136

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Fortner RT, Schock H, Le Cornet C, Huesing A, Vitonis AF, Johnson TS, Fichorova RN, Fashemi T, Yamamoto HS, Tjonneland A, Hansen L, Overvad K, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Kvaskoff M, Severi G, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Papatesta E-M, La Vecchia C, Palli D, Sieri S, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Mattiello A, Onland-Moret NC, Peeters PH, Bueno-de-Mesquita HBA, Weiderpass E, Ramon Quiros J, Duell EJ, Sanchez M-J, Navarro C, Ardanaz E, Larranaga N, Nodin B, Jirstrom K, Idahl A, Lundin E, Khaw K-T, Travis RC, Gunter M, Johansson M, Dossus L, Merritt MA, Riboli E, Terry KL, Cramer DW, Kaaks Ret al., 2018, Ovarian cancer early detection by circulating CA125 in the context of anti-CA125 autoantibody levels: Results from the EPIC cohort, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 142, Pages: 1355-1360, ISSN: 0020-7136

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Gunter MJ, Murphy N, Muller DC, Riboli Eet al., 2018, Coffee Drinking and Mortality in 10 European Countries Response, ANNALS OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, Vol: 168, Pages: 380-381, ISSN: 0003-4819

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Kaaks R, Fortner RT, Hüsing A, Barrdahl M, Hopper M, Johnson T, Tjønneland A, Hansen L, Overvad K, Fournier A, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Kvaskoff M, Dossus L, Johansson M, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Benetou V, La Vecchia C, Sieri S, Mattiello A, Palli D, Tumino R, Matullo G, Onland-Moret NC, Gram IT, Weiderpass E, Sánchez M-J, Navarro Sanchez C, Duell EJ, Ardanaz E, Larranaga N, Lundin E, Idahl A, Jirström K, Nodin B, Travis RC, Riboli E, Merritt M, Aune D, Terry K, Cramer DW, Anderson KSet al., 2018, Tumor-associated autoantibodies as early detection markers for ovarian cancer? A prospective evaluation., Int J Cancer

Immuno-proteomic screening has identified several tumor-associated autoantibodies (AAb) that may have diagnostic capacity for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, with AAbs to P53 proteins and cancer-testis antigens (CTAGs) as prominent examples. However, the early detection potential of these AAbs has been insufficiently explored in prospective studies. We performed ELISA measurements of AAbs to CTAG1A, CTAG2, P53 and NUDT11 proteins, for 194 patients with ovarian cancer and 705 matched controls from the European EPIC cohort, using serum samples collected up to 36 months prior to diagnosis under usual care. CA125 was measured using electrochemo-luminiscence. Diagnostic discrimination statistics were calculated by strata of lead-time between blood collection and diagnosis. With lead times ≤6 months, ovarian cancer detection sensitivity at 0.98 specificity (SE98) varied from 0.19 [95% CI 0.08-0.40] for CTAG1A, CTAG2 and NUDT1 to 0.23 [0.10-0.44] for P53 (0.33 [0.11-0.68] for high-grade serous tumors). However, at longer lead-times, the ability of these AAb markers to distinguish future ovarian cancer cases from controls declined rapidly; at lead times >1 year, SE98 estimates were close to zero (all invasive cases, range: 0.01-0.11). Compared to CA125 alone, combined logistic regression scores of AAbs and CA125 did not improve detection sensitivity at equal level of specificity. The added value of these selected AAbs as markers for ovarian cancer beyond CA125 for early detection is therefore limited.

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Kröger J, Meidtner K, Stefan N, Guevara M, Kerrison ND, Ardanaz E, Aune D, Boeing H, Dorronsoro M, Dow C, Fagherazzi G, Franks PW, Freisling H, Gunter MJ, Huerta JM, Kaaks R, Key TJ, Khaw KT, Krogh V, Kühn T, Mancini FR, Mattiello A, Nilsson PM, Olsen A, Overvad K, Palli D, Quirós JR, Rolandsson O, Sacerdote C, Sala N, Salamanca-Fernández E, Sluijs I, Spijkerman AM, Tjonneland A, Tsilidis KK, Tumino R, van der Schouw YT, Forouhi NG, Sharp SJ, Langenberg C, Riboli E, Schulze MB, Wareham NJet al., 2018, Circulating Fetuin-A and risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Mendelian randomization analysis, Diabetes, ISSN: 0012-1797

Fetuin-A, a hepatic-origin protein, is strongly positively associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in human observational studies, but it is unknown whether this association is causal. We aimed to study the potential causal relation of circulating fetuin-A to risk of type 2 diabetes in a Mendelian Randomization study with SNPs located in the fetuin-A-encodingAHSGgene. We used data from eight European countries of the prospective EPIC-InterAct case-cohort study including 10,020 incident cases. Plasma fetuin-A concentration was measured in a subset of 965 subcohort participants and 654 cases. A genetic score of theAHSGSNPs was strongly associated with fetuin-A (28% explained variation). Using the genetic score as instrumental variable of fetuin-A, we observed no significant association of a 50 µg/ml higher fetuin-A concentration with diabetes risk (HR 1.02 [95%-CI 0.97, 1.07]). Combining our results with those from the Diabetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) consortium (12,171 cases) also did not suggest a clear significant relation of fetuin-A with diabetes risk. In conclusion, although there is mechanistical evidence for an effect of fetuin-A on insulin sensitivity and secretion, this study doesn't support a strong, relevant relationship between circulating fetuin-A and diabetes risk in the general population.

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Li SX, Imamura F, Schulze MB, Zheng J, Ye Z, Agudo A, Ardanaz E, Aune D, Boeing H, Dorronsoro M, Dow C, Fagherazzi G, Grioni S, Gunter MJ, Huerta JM, Ibsen DB, Jakobsen MU, Kaaks R, Key TJ, Khaw K-T, Kyrø C, Mancini FR, Molina-Portillo E, Murphy N, Nilsson PM, Onland-Moret NC, Palli D, Panico S, Poveda A, Quirós JR, Ricceri F, Sluijs I, Spijkerman AMW, Tjonneland A, Tumino R, Winkvist A, Langenberg C, Sharp SJ, Riboli E, Scott RA, Forouhi NG, Wareham NJet al., 2018, Interplay between genetic predisposition, macronutrient intake and type 2 diabetes incidence: analysis within EPIC-InterAct across eight European countries., Diabetologia

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Gene-macronutrient interactions may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes but research evidence to date is inconclusive. We aimed to increase our understanding of the aetiology of type 2 diabetes by investigating potential interactions between genes and macronutrient intake and their association with the incidence of type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We investigated the influence of interactions between genetic risk scores (GRSs) for type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and BMI and macronutrient intake on the development of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct, a prospective case-cohort study across eight European countries (N = 21,900 with 9742 incident type 2 diabetes cases). Macronutrient intake was estimated from diets reported in questionnaires, including proportion of energy derived from total carbohydrate, protein, fat, plant and animal protein, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat and dietary fibre. Using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression, we estimated country-specific interaction results on the multiplicative scale, using random-effects meta-analysis. Secondary analysis used isocaloric macronutrient substitution. RESULTS: No interactions were identified between any of the three GRSs and any macronutrient intake, with low-to-moderate heterogeneity between countries (I2 range 0-51.6%). Results were similar using isocaloric macronutrient substitution analyses and when weighted and unweighted GRSs and individual SNPs were examined. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and BMI did not modify the association between macronutrient intake and incident type 2 diabetes. This suggests that macronutrient intake recommendations to prevent type 2 diabetes do not need to account for differences in genetic predisposition to these three metabolic conditions.

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Meidtner K, Podmore C, Kröger J, van der Schouw YT, Bendinelli B, Agnoli C, Arriola L, Barricarte A, Boeing H, Cross AJ, Dow C, Ekblom K, Fagherazzi G, Franks PW, Gunter MJ, Huerta JM, Jakszyn P, Jenab M, Katzke VA, Key TJ, Khaw KT, Kühn T, Kyrø C, Mancini FR, Melander O, Nilsson PM, Overvad K, Palli D, Panico S, Quirós JR, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Sacerdote C, Sluijs I, Stepien M, Tjonneland A, Tumino R, Forouhi NG, Sharp SJ, Langenberg C, Schulze MB, Riboli E, Wareham NJet al., 2018, Interaction of Dietary and Genetic Factors Influencing Body Iron Status and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Within the EPIC-InterAct Study., Diabetes Care, Vol: 41, Pages: 277-285

OBJECTIVE: Meat intake has been consistently shown to be positively associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Part of that association may be mediated by body iron status, which is influenced by genetic factors. We aimed to test for interactions of genetic and dietary factors influencing body iron status in relation to the risk of incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The case-cohort comprised 9,347 case subjects and 12,301 subcohort participants from eight European countries. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from genome-wide association studies on iron status biomarkers and candidate gene studies. A ferritin-related gene score was constructed. Multiplicative and additive interactions of heme iron and SNPs as well as the gene score were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: Higher heme iron intake (per 1 SD) was associated with higher ferritin levels (β = 0.113 [95% CI 0.082; 0.144]), but not with transferrin (-0.019 [-0.043; 0.006]) or transferrin saturation (0.016 [-0.006; 0.037]). Five SNPs located in four genes (rs1799945 [HFE H63D], rs1800562 [HFE C282Y], rs236918 [PCK7], rs744653 [SLC40A1], and rs855791 [TMPRSS6 V736A]) were associated with ferritin. We did not detect an interaction of heme iron and the gene score on the risk of diabetes in the overall study population (Padd = 0.16, Pmult = 0.21) but did detect a trend toward a negative interaction in men (Padd = 0.04, Pmult = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: We found no convincing evidence that the interplay of dietary and genetic factors related to body iron status associates with type 2 diabetes risk above the level expected from the sum or product of the two individual exposures.

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Naudin S, Li K, Jaouen T, Assi N, Kyrø C, Tjønneland A, Overvad K, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Rebours V, Védié A-L, Boeing H, Kaaks R, Katzke V, Bamia C, Naska A, Trichopoulou A, Berrino F, Tagliabue G, Palli D, Panico S, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Peeters PH, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Weiderpass Vainio E, Gram IT, Skeie G, Chirlaque M-D, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Barricarte A, Quirós JR, Dorronsoro M, Johansson I, Sund M, Sternby H, Bradbury KE, Wareham N, Riboli E, Gunter M, Brennan P, Duell EJ, Ferrari Pet al., 2018, Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study., Int J Cancer

Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In our study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, 1,283 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 476,106 cancer-free participants, followed up for 14 years. Amounts of lifetime and baseline alcohol were estimated through lifestyle and dietary questionnaires, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models with age as primary time variable were used to estimate PC hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Alcohol intake was positively associated with PC risk in men. Associations were mainly driven by extreme alcohol levels, with HRs comparing heavy drinkers (>60 g/day) to the reference category (0.1-4.9 g/day) equal to 1.77 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.95) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.29) for lifetime and baseline alcohol, respectively. Baseline alcohol intakes from beer (>40 g/day) and spirits/liquors (>10 g/day) showed HRs equal to 1.58 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.34) and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.94), respectively, compared to the reference category (0.1-2.9 g/day). In women, HR estimates did not reach statistically significance. The alcohol and PC risk association was not modified by smoking status. Findings from a large prospective study suggest that baseline and lifetime alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake.

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Smith T, Muller DC, Moons KGM, Cross AJ, Johansson M, Ferrari P, Fagherazzi G, Peeters PHM, Severi G, Hüsing A, Kaaks R, Tjonneland A, Olsen A, Overvad K, Bonet C, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Huerta JM, Barricarte Gurrea A, Bradbury KE, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Orfanos P, Palli D, Pala V, Vineis P, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Ohlsson B, Harlid S, Van Guelpen B, Skeie G, Weiderpass E, Jenab M, Murphy N, Riboli E, Gunter MJ, Aleksandrova KJ, Tzoulaki Iet al., 2018, Comparison of prognostic models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer in asymptomatic individuals: a systematic literature review and external validation in the EPIC and UK Biobank prospective cohort studies., Gut

OBJECTIVE: To systematically identify and validate published colorectal cancer risk prediction models that do not require invasive testing in two large population-based prospective cohorts. DESIGN: Models were identified through an update of a published systematic review and validated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and the UK Biobank. The performance of the models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer within 5 or 10 years after study enrolment was assessed by discrimination (C-statistic) and calibration (plots of observed vs predicted probability). RESULTS: The systematic review and its update identified 16 models from 8 publications (8 colorectal, 5 colon and 3 rectal). The number of participants included in each model validation ranged from 41 587 to 396 515, and the number of cases ranged from 115 to 1781. Eligible and ineligible participants across the models were largely comparable. Calibration of the models, where assessable, was very good and further improved by recalibration. The C-statistics of the models were largely similar between validation cohorts with the highest values achieved being 0.70 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.72) in the UK Biobank and 0.71 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.74) in EPIC. CONCLUSION: Several of these non-invasive models exhibited good calibration and discrimination within both external validation populations and are therefore potentially suitable candidates for the facilitation of risk stratification in population-based colorectal screening programmes. Future work should both evaluate this potential, through modelling and impact studies, and ascertain if further enhancement in their performance can be obtained.

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Zamora-Ros R, Beraud V, Franceschi S, Cayssials V, Tsilidis KK, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Weiderpass E, Overvad K, Tjonneland A, Eriksen AK, Bonnet F, Affret A, Katzke V, Kuehn T, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Valanou E, Karakatsani A, Masala G, Grioni S, de Magistris MS, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Skeie G, Parr CL, Merino S, Salamanca-Fernandez E, Chirlaque M-D, Ardanaz E, Amiano P, Almquist M, Drake I, Hennings J, Sandstrom M, Bueno-de-Mesquita HBA, Peeters PH, Khaw K-T, Wareham NJ, Schmidt JA, Perez-Cornago A, Aune D, Riboli E, Slimani N, Scalbert A, Romieu I, Agudo A, Rinaldi Set al., 2018, Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 142, Pages: 449-459, ISSN: 0020-7136

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de Pablo P, Romaguera D, Fisk HL, Calder PC, Quirke A-M, Cartwright AJ, Panico S, Mattiello A, Gavrila D, Navarro C, Sacerdote C, Vineis P, Tumino R, Ollier WE, Michaud DS, Riboli E, Venables PJ, Fisher BAet al., 2018, High erythrocyte levels of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid are associated with lower risk of subsequent rheumatoid arthritis in a southern European nested case-control study., Ann Rheum Dis

OBJECTIVES: Findings relating to dietary intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are mixed. Erythrocyte membrane PUFA is an accurate objective biomarker of PUFA status; however, there are little data on erythrocyte membrane PUFA and risk of RA. The objective was therefore to compare erythrocyte membrane PUFA between pre-RA individuals and matched controls from a population-based sample, and specifically to test the hypothesis that higher levels of longer chain n-3 PUFA are associated with lower risk of RA. METHODS: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) is a large European prospective cohort study of apparently healthy populations. We undertook a nested case-control study by identifying RA cases with onset after enrolment (pre-RA) in four EPIC cohorts in Italy and Spain. Confirmed pre-RA cases were matched with controls by age, sex, centre, and date, time and fasting status at blood collection. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of PUFA with the development of RA, adjusting for potential confounders including body mass index, waist circumference, education level, physical activity, smoking status and alcohol intake. RESULTS: The study analysed samples from 96 pre-RA subjects and 258 matched controls. In this analysis, the median time to diagnosis (defined as time between date of blood sample and date of diagnosis) was 6.71 years (range 0.8-15). A significant inverse association was observed with n-6 PUFA linoleic acid (LA) levels and pre-RA in the fully adjusted model (highest tertile: OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.75; P for trend 0.01). No association was observed with any individual n-3 PUFA, total n-3 PUFA or total n-3:n-6 ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Erythrocyte levels of the n-6 PUFA LA were inversely associated with risk of RA, whereas no associations were observed for other n-6 or n-3 PUFA. Further work is warranted to replicate these findings and

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van Duijnhoven FJB, Jenab M, Hveem K, Siersema PD, Fedirko V, Duell EJ, Kampman E, Halfweeg A, van Kranen HJ, van den Ouweland JMW, Weiderpass E, Murphy N, Langhammer A, Ness-Jensen E, Olsen A, Tjonneland A, Overvad K, Cadeau C, Kvaskoff M, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Katzke VA, Kuehn T, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Kotanidou A, Kritikou M, Palli D, Agnoli C, Tumino R, Panico S, Matullo G, Peeters P, Brustad M, Olsen KS, Lasheras C, Obon-Santacana M, Sanchez M-J, Dorronsoro M, Chirlaque M-D, Barricarte A, Manjer J, Almquist M, Renstrom F, Ye W, Wareham N, Khaw K-T, Bradbury KE, Freisling H, Aune D, Norat T, Riboli E, Bueno-de-Mesquita HBAet al., 2018, Circulating concentrations of vitamin D in relation to pancreatic cancer risk in European populations, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 142, Pages: 1189-1201, ISSN: 0020-7136

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Al-Dabhani K, Tsilidis KK, Murphy N, Ward HA, Elliott P, Riboli E, Gunter M, Tzoulaki Iet al., 2017, Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and association with metabolic syndrome in a Qatari population, NUTRITION & DIABETES, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2044-4052

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Aleksandrova K, Jenab M, Leitzmann M, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Kaaks R, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Lagiou P, Rinaldi S, Freisling H, Carayol M, Pischon T, Drogan D, Weiderpass E, Jakszyn P, Overvad K, Dahm CC, Tjonneland A, Bouton-Ruault M-C, Kuehn T, Peppa E, Valanou E, La Vecchia C, Palli D, Panico S, Sacerdote C, Agnoli C, Tumino R, May A, van Vulpen J, Borch KB, Oyeyemi SO, Ramon Quiros J, Bonet C, Sanchez M-J, Dorronsoro M, Navarro C, Barricarte A, van Guelpen B, Wennberg P, Key TJ, Khaw K-T, Wareham N, Assi N, Ward HA, Aune D, Riboli E, Boeing Het al., 2017, Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer: insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from the EPIC cohort, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 46, Pages: 1823-1835, ISSN: 0300-5771

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Aleksandrova K, Schlesinger S, Fedirko V, Jenab M, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Freisling H, Romieu I, Pischon T, Kaaks R, Gunter MJ, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Rostgaard-Hansen AL, Tjonneland A, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Lagiou P, Agnoli C, Mattiello A, Bradbury K, Khaw K-T, Riboli E, Boeing Het al., 2017, Metabolic Mediators of the Association Between Adult Weight Gain and Colorectal Cancer: Data From the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Cohort, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 185, Pages: 751-764, ISSN: 0002-9262

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Ambatipudi S, Horvath S, Perrier F, Cuenin C, Hernandez-Vargas H, Le Calvez-Kelm F, Durand G, Byrnes G, Ferrari P, Bouaoun L, Sklias A, Chajes V, Overvad K, Seven G, Baglietto L, Clavel-Chapelon F, Kaaks R, Barrdahl M, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Naska A, Masala G, Agnoli C, Polidoro S, Tumino R, Panico S, Dolle M, Peeters PHM, Onland-Moret NC, Sandanger TM, Nost TH, Weiderpass E, Quiros JR, Agudo A, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Castano JMH, Barricarte A, Fernandez AM, Travis RC, Vineis P, Muller DC, Riboli E, Gunter M, Romieu I, Herceg Zet al., 2017, DNA methylome analysis identifies accelerated epigenetic ageing associated with postmenopausal breast cancer susceptibility, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 75, Pages: 299-307, ISSN: 0959-8049

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Aune D, Giovannucci E, Boffetta P, Fadnes LT, Keum N, Norat T, Greenwood DC, Riboli E, Vatten LJ, Tonstad Set al., 2017, Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality-a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 46, Pages: 1029-1056, ISSN: 0300-5771

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Aune D, Sen A, Schlesinger S, Norat T, Janszky I, Romundstad P, Tonstad S, Riboli E, Vatten LJet al., 2017, Body mass index, abdominal fatness, fat mass and the risk of atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 32, Pages: 181-192, ISSN: 0393-2990

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Bergmann MM, Hernandez V, Bernigau W, Boeing H, Chan SSM, Luben R, Khaw K-T, van Schaik F, Oldenburg B, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Overvad K, Palli D, Masala G, Carbonnel F, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Olsen A, Tjonneland A, Kaaks R, Katzke V, Riboli E, Hart ARet al., 2017, No association of alcohol use and the risk of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease: data from a European Prospective cohort study (EPIC), EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 71, Pages: 512-518, ISSN: 0954-3007

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Brennan P, Perola M, van Ommen G-J, Riboli Eet al., 2017, Chronic disease research in Europe and the need for integrated population cohorts, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 32, Pages: 741-749, ISSN: 0393-2990

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Byrne KS, Maria Castano J, Dolores Chirlaque M, Lilja H, Agudo A, Ardanaz E, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Boeing H, Kaaks R, Khaw K-T, Larranaga N, Navarro C, Olsen A, Overvad K, Perez-Cornago A, Rohrmann S, Jose Sanchez M, Tjonneland A, Tsilidis KK, Johansson M, Riboli E, Key TJ, Travis RCet al., 2017, Vasectomy and Prostate Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Vol: 35, Pages: 1297-+, ISSN: 0732-183X

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Chajes V, Assi N, Biessy C, Ferrari P, Rinaldi S, Slimani N, Lenoir GM, Baglietto L, His M, Boutron-Ruault MC, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Katsoulis M, Kaaks R, Kuehn T, Panico S, Pala V, Masala G, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Peeters PH, van Gils C, Hjartaker A, Olsen KS, Barnung RB, Barricarte A, Redondo-Sanchez D, Menendez V, Amiano P, Wennberg M, Key T, Khaw KT, Merritt MA, Riboli E, Gunter MJ, Romieu Iet al., 2017, A prospective evaluation of plasma phospholipid fatty acids and breast cancer risk in the EPIC study, ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Vol: 28, Pages: 2836-2842, ISSN: 0923-7534

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