Imperial College London

Prof Ed Tate

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Chemistry

Professor of Chemical Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3752e.tate Website CV

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Agnes Lee +44 (0)20 7594 9852

 
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Location

 

301BMolecular Sciences Research HubWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

157 results found

Dian C, Inmaculada P-D, Riviere F, Asensio T, Legrand P, Ritzefeld M, Shen M, Cota E, Meinnel T, Tate E, Giglione Cet al., High-resolution snapshots of human N-myristoyltransferase in action illuminate a mechanism promoting N-terminal Lys and Gly myristoylation, Nature Communications, ISSN: 2041-1723

Journal article

Howard RT, Hemsley P, Petteruti P, Saunders CN, Molina Bermejo JA, Scott JS, Johannes JW, Tate EWet al., Structure-guided design and in-cell target profiling of a cell-active target engagement probe for PARP inhibitors, ACS Chemical Biology, ISSN: 1554-8929

Journal article

Benfield CT, MacKenzie F, Ritzefeld M, Mazzon M, Weston S, Tate E, Teo BH, Smith SE, Kellam P, Holmes EC, Marsh Met al., 2020, Bat IFITM3 restriction depends on S-palmitoylation and a polymorphic site within the CD225 domain, Life Science Alliance, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2575-1077

Host interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are broad-spectrum antiviral restriction factors. Of these, IFITM3 potently inhibits viruses that enter cells through acidic endosomes, many of which are zoonotic and emerging viruses with bats (order Chiroptera) as their natural hosts. We previously demonstrated that microbat IFITM3 is antiviral. Here, we show that bat IFITMs are characterized by strong adaptive evolution and identify a highly variable and functionally important site-codon 70-within the conserved CD225 domain of IFITMs. Mutation of this residue in microbat IFITM3 impairs restriction of representatives of four different virus families that enter cells via endosomes. This mutant shows altered subcellular localization and reduced S-palmitoylation, a phenotype copied by mutation of conserved cysteine residues in microbat IFITM3. Furthermore, we show that microbat IFITM3 is S-palmitoylated on cysteine residues C71, C72, and C105, mutation of each cysteine individually impairs virus restriction, and a triple C71A-C72A-C105A mutant loses all restriction activity, concomitant with subcellular re-localization of microbat IFITM3 to Golgi-associated sites. Thus, we propose that S-palmitoylation is critical for Chiropteran IFITM3 function and identify a key molecular determinant of IFITM3 S-palmitoylation.

Journal article

Kryza T, Bock N, Lovell S, Rockstroh A, Lehman ML, Lesner A, Panchadsaram J, Silva LM, Srinivasan S, Snell CE, Williams ED, Fazli L, Gleave M, Batra J, Nelson C, Tate EW, Harris J, Hooper JD, Clements JAet al., 2020, The molecular function of kallikrein-related peptidase 14 demonstrates a key modulatory role in advanced prostate cancer, Molecular Oncology, Vol: 14, Pages: 105-128, ISSN: 1574-7891

Kallikrein-related peptidase 14 (KLK14) is one of several secreted KLK serine proteases involved in prostate cancer (PCa) pathogenesis. While relatively understudied, recent reports have identified KLK14 as overexpressed during PCa development. However, the modulation of KLK14 expression during PCa progression and the molecular and biological functions of this protease in the prostate tumour microenvironment remain unknown. To determine the modulation of KLK14 expression during PCa progression, we analysed the expression levels of KLK14 in patient samples using publicly available databases and immunohistochemistry. In order to delineate the molecular mechanisms involving KLK14 in PCa progression, we integrated proteomic, transcriptomic and in vitro assays with the goal to identify substrates, related-signalling pathways and functional roles of this protease. We showed that KLK14 expression is elevated in advanced PCa, and particularly in metastasis. Additionally, KLK14 levels were found to be decreased in PCa tissues from patients responsive to neo-adjuvant therapy compared to untreated patients. Furthermore, we also identified that KLK14 expression re-occurred in patients who developed castrate-resistant PCa. The combination of proteomic and transcriptomic analysis as well as functional assays revealed several new KLK14-substrates (agrin, desmoglein 2, vitronectin, laminins) and KLK14-regulated genes (Interleukin 32, midkine, Sox9), particularly an involvement of the MAPK1 and IL1RN pathways, and an involvement of KLK14 in the regulation of cellular migration, supporting its involvement in aggressive features of PCa progression. In conclusion, our work showed that KLK14 expression is associated with the development of aggressive PCa suggesting that targeting this protease could offer a novel route to limit the progression of prostate tumours. Additional work is necessary to determine the benefits and implications of targeting/co-targeting KLK14 in PCa as well as to

Journal article

Conole D, Mondal M, Majmudar JD, Tate EWet al., 2019, Recent Developments in Cell Permeable Deubiquitinating Enzyme Activity-Based Probes, FRONTIERS IN CHEMISTRY, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2296-2646

Journal article

Beard R, Gaboriau D, Gee A, Tate Eet al., 2019, Chemical biology tools for probing transcytosis at the blood-brain barrier, Chemical Science, Vol: 10, Pages: 10772-10778, ISSN: 2041-6520

Absorptive- and receptor-mediated transcytosis (AMT/RMT) are widely studied strategies to deliver therapeutics across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). However, an improved understanding of the mechanism surrounding trafficking is required that could promote delivery. Accordingly, we designed a flexible platform that merged AMT and RMT motifs on a single scaffold to probe various parameters (ligand, affinity, valency, position) in a screening campaign. During this process we adapted an in vitro BBB model to reliably rank transcytosis of the vehicle library. Our results demonstrate heightened uptake and trafficking for the shuttles, with a structure–activity relationship for transcytosis emerging. Notably, due to their small size, the majority of shuttles demonstrated increased permeation compared to transferrin, with the highest performing shuttle affording a 4.9-fold increase. Consequently, we have identified novel peptide conjugates that have the capacity to act as promising brain shuttles.

Journal article

McCluskey S, Haslop A, Coello C, Gunn R, Tate E, Southworth R, Plisson C, Long NJ, Wells Let al., 2019, Imaging chemotherapy induced acute cardiotoxicity with 18F-labelled lipophilic cations, Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol: 60, Pages: 1750-1756, ISSN: 1535-5667

Many chemotherapy agents are toxic to the heart, such that increasing numbers of cancer survivors are now living with the potentially lethal cardiovascular consequences of their treatment. Earlier and more sensitive detection of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity may allow improved treatment strategies and increase long-term survival. Lipophilic cation positron emission tomography (PET) tracers may be suitable for early detection of cardiotoxicity. This study aims to evaluate an 18F-labelled lipophilic phosphonium cation e.g. 18F-Mitophos, as a cardiac imaging agent, comparing it to leading PET and SPECT lipophilic cationic tracers before further assessing its potential for imaging cardiotoxicity in an acute doxorubicin (DOX) model.

Journal article

Doll S, Freitas FP, Shah R, Aldrovandi M, da Silva MC, Ingold I, Grocin AG, Xavier da Silva TN, Panzilius E, Scheel CH, Mourão A, Buday K, Sato M, Wanninger J, Vignane T, Mohana V, Rehberg M, Flatley A, Schepers A, Kurz A, White D, Sauer M, Sattler M, Tate EW, Schmitz W, Schulze A, O'Donnell V, Proneth B, Popowicz GM, Pratt DA, Angeli JPF, Conrad Met al., 2019, FSP1 is a glutathione-independent ferroptosis suppressor., Nature, Vol: 575, Pages: 693-698, ISSN: 0028-0836

Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of necrotic cell death marked by oxidative damage to phospholipids1,2. To date, ferroptosis has been thought to be controlled only by the phospholipid hydroperoxide-reducing enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4)3,4 and radical-trapping antioxidants5,6. However, elucidation of the factors that underlie the sensitivity of a given cell type to ferroptosis7 is crucial to understand the pathophysiological role of ferroptosis and how it may be exploited for the treatment of cancer. Although metabolic constraints8 and phospholipid composition9,10 contribute to ferroptosis sensitivity, no cell-autonomous mechanisms have been identified that account for the resistance of cells to ferroptosis. Here we used an expression cloning approach to identify genes in human cancer cells that are able to complement the loss of GPX4. We found that the flavoprotein apoptosis-inducing factor mitochondria-associated 2 (AIFM2) is a previously unrecognized anti-ferroptotic gene. AIFM2, which we renamed ferroptosis suppressor protein 1 (FSP1) and which was initially described as a pro-apoptotic gene11, confers protection against ferroptosis elicited by GPX4 deletion. We further demonstrate that the suppression of ferroptosis by FSP1 is mediated by ubiquinone (also known as coenzyme Q10, CoQ10): the reduced form, ubiquinol, traps lipid peroxyl radicals that mediate lipid peroxidation, whereas FSP1 catalyses the regeneration of CoQ10 using NAD(P)H. Pharmacological targeting of FSP1 strongly synergizes with GPX4 inhibitors to trigger ferroptosis in a number of cancer entities. In conclusion, the FSP1-CoQ10-NAD(P)H pathway exists as a stand-alone parallel system, which co-operates with GPX4 and glutathione to suppress phospholipid peroxidation and ferroptosis.

Journal article

Barry R, Ruano-Gallego D, Radhakrishnan ST, Lovell S, Yu L, Kotik O, Glegola-Madejska I, Tate EW, Choudhary JS, Williams HRT, Frankel Get al., 2019, Faecal neutrophil elastase-antiprotease balance reflects colitis severity, Mucosal Immunology, ISSN: 1933-0219

Given the global burden of diarrheal diseases on healthcare it is surprising how little is known about the drivers of disease severity. Colitis caused by infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterised by neutrophil infiltration into the intestinal mucosa and yet our understanding of neutrophil responses during colitis is incomplete. Using infectious (Citrobacter rodentium) and chemical (dextran sulphate sodium; DSS) murine colitis models, as well as human IBD samples, we find that faecal neutrophil elastase (NE) activity reflects disease severity. During C. rodentium infection intestinal epithelial cells secrete the serine protease inhibitor SerpinA3N to inhibit and mitigate tissue damage caused by extracellular NE. Mice suffering from severe infection produce insufficient SerpinA3N to control excessive NE activity. This activity contributes to colitis severity as infection of these mice with a recombinant C. rodentium strain producing and secreting SerpinA3N reduces tissue damage. Thus, uncontrolled luminal NE activity is involved in severe colitis. Taken together, our findings suggest that NE activity could be a useful faecal biomarker for assessing disease severity as well as therapeutic target for both infectious and chronic inflammatory colitis.

Journal article

Tzakoniati F, Xu H, Garcia N, Kugel C, Payandeh J, Koth CM, Tate Eet al., Development of photocrosslinking probes based on Huwentoxin-IV to map the site of interaction on Nav1.7, Cell Chemical Biology, ISSN: 2451-9456

Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels respond to changes in the membrane potential of excitable cells through the concerted action of four voltage-sensor domains (VSDs). Subtype Nav1.7 plays an important role in the propagation of signals in pain-sensing neurons and is a target for the clinical development of novel analgesics. Certain inhibitory cystine knot (ICK) peptides produced by venomous animals potently modulate Nav1.7, however the molecular mechanisms underlying their selective binding and activity remain elusive. This study reports on the design of a library of photoprobes based on the potent spider toxin Huwentoxin-IV and the determination of the toxin binding interface on VSD2 of Nav1.7 through a photocrosslinking and tandem mass spectrometry approach. Our Huwentoxin-IV probes selectively crosslink to extracellular loop S1-2 and helix S3 of VSD2 in a chimeric channel system. Our results provide a strategy that will enable mapping of sites of interaction of other ICK peptides on Nav channels.

Journal article

Lim C, Ha KP, Clarke R, Gavin L-A, Cook D, Hutton J, Sutherell C, Edwards A, Evans L, Tate E, Lanyon-Hogg Tet al., 2019, Identification of a potent small-molecule inhibitor of bacterial DNA repair that potentiates quinolone antibiotic activity in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Vol: 27, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 0968-0896

The global emergence of antibiotic resistance is one of the most serious challenges facing modern medicine. There is an urgent need for validation of new drug targets and the development of small molecules with novel mechanisms of action. We therefore sought to inhibit bacterial DNA repair mediated by the AddAB/RecBCD protein complexes as a means to sensitize bacteria to DNA damage caused by the host immune system or quinolone antibiotics. A rational, hypothesis-driven compound optimization identified IMP-1700 as a cell-active, nanomolar potency compound. IMP-1700 sensitized multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin, where resistance results from a point mutation in the fluoroquinolone target, DNA gyrase. Cellular reporter assays indicated IMP-1700 inhibited the bacterial SOS-response to DNA damage, and compound-functionalized Sepharose successfully pulled-down the AddAB repair complex. This work provides validation of bacterial DNA repair as a novel therapeutic target and delivers IMP-1700 as a tool molecule and starting point for therapeutic development to address the pressing challenge of antibiotic resistance.

Journal article

Serwa RA, Sekine E, Brown J, Teo SHC, Tate EW, O'Hare Pet al., 2019, Analysis of a fully infectious bio-orthogonally modified human virus reveals novel features of virus cell entry, PLoS Pathogens, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1553-7366

We report the analysis of a complex enveloped human virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV), assembled after in vivo incorporation of bio-orthogonal methionine analogues homopropargylglycine (HPG) or azidohomoalanine (AHA). We optimised protocols for the production of virions incorporating AHA (termed HSVAHA), identifying conditions which resulted in normal yields of HSV and normal particle/pfu ratios. Moreover we show that essentially every single HSVAHA capsid-containing particle was detectable at the individual particle level by chemical ligation of azide-linked fluorochromes to AHA-containing structural proteins. This was a completely specific chemical ligation, with no capsids assembled under normal methionine-containing conditions detected in parallel. We demonstrate by quantitative mass spectrometric analysis that HSVAHA virions exhibit no qualitative or quantitative differences in the repertoires of structural proteins compared to virions assembled under normal conditions. Individual proteins and AHA incorporation sites were identified in capsid, tegument and envelope compartments, including major essential structural proteins. Finally we reveal novel aspects of entry pathways using HSVAHA and chemical fluorochrome ligation that were not apparent from conventional immunofluorescence. Since ligation targets total AHA-containing protein and peptides, our results demonstrate the presence of abundant AHA-labelled products in cytoplasmic macrodomains and tubules which no longer contain intact particles detectable by immunofluorescence. Although these do not co-localise with lysosomal markers, we propose they may represent sites of proteolytic virion processing. Analysis of HSVAHA also enabled the discrimination from primary entering from secondary assembling virions, demonstrating assembly and second round infection within 6 hrs of initial infection and dual infections of primary and secondary virus in spatially restricted cytoplasmic areas of the same cell. Together w

Journal article

Rueda-Zubiaurre A, Yahiya S, Fischer O, Hu X, Saunders C, Sharma S, Straschil U, Shen J, Tate EW, Delves M, Baum J, Barnard A, Fuchter MJet al., 2019, Structure-activity relationship studies of a novel class of transmission blocking antimalarials targeting male gametes., Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN: 0022-2623

Malaria is still a leading cause of mortality among children in the developing world, and despite the immense progress made in reducing the global burden, further efforts are needed if eradication is to be achieved. In this context, targeting transmission is widely recognized as a necessary intervention towards that goal. After carrying out a screen to discover new transmission-blocking agents, herein we report our medicinal chemistry efforts to study the potential of the most robust hit, DDD01035881, as a male-gamete targeted compound. We reveal key structural features for the activity of this series and identify analogues with greater potency and improved metabolic stability. We believe this study lays the groundwork for further development of this series as a transmission blocking agent.

Journal article

Tapodi A, Clemens DM, Uwineza A, Jarrin M, Goldberg MW, Thinon E, Heal WP, Tate EW, Nemeth-Cahalan K, Vorontsova I, Hall JE, Quinlan RAet al., 2019, BFSP1 C-terminal domains released by post-translational processing events can alter significantly the calcium regulation of AQPO water permeability, EXPERIMENTAL EYE RESEARCH, Vol: 185, ISSN: 0014-4835

Journal article

Schlott AC, Mayclin S, Reers AR, Coburn-Flynn O, Bell AS, Green J, Knuepfer E, Charter D, Bonnert R, Campo B, Burrows J, Lyons-Abbott S, Staker BL, Chung C-W, Myler PJ, Fidock DA, Tate EW, Holder AAet al., 2019, Structure-guided identification of resistance breaking antimalarial N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors, Cell Chemical Biology, Vol: 26, Pages: 991-1000.e7, ISSN: 2451-9448

The attachment of myristate to the N-terminal glycine of certain proteins is largely a co-translational modification catalyzed by N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), and involved in protein membrane-localization. Pathogen NMT is a validated therapeutic target in numerous infectious diseases including malaria. In Plasmodium falciparum, NMT substrates are important in essential processes including parasite gliding motility and host cell invasion. Here, we generated parasites resistant to a particular NMT inhibitor series and show that resistance in an in vitro parasite growth assay is mediated by a single amino acid substitution in the NMT substrate-binding pocket. The basis of resistance was validated and analyzed with a structure-guided approach using crystallography, in combination with enzyme activity, stability, and surface plasmon resonance assays, allowing identification of another inhibitor series unaffected by this substitution. We suggest that resistance studies incorporated early in the drug development process help selection of drug combinations to impede rapid evolution of parasite resistance.

Journal article

Birtley JR, Alomary M, Zanini E, Antony J, Maben Z, Weaver G, von Arx C, Mura M, Marinho AT, Lu H, Morecroft E, Karali E, Chayen N, Tate E, Jurewicz M, Stern L, Recchi C, Gabra Het al., 2019, Inactivating mutations and X-ray crystal structure of the tumor suppressor OPCML reveal cancer-associated functions, Nature Communications, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2041-1723

OPCML, a tumor suppressor gene, is frequently silenced epigenetically in ovarian and other cancers. Here we report, by analysis of databases of tumor sequences, the observation of OPCML somatic missense mutations from various tumor types and the impact of these mutations on OPCML function, by solving the X-ray crystal structure of this glycoprotein to 2.65 Å resolution. OPCML consists of an extended arrangement of three immunoglobulin-like domains and homodimerizes via a network of contacts between membrane-distal domains. We report the generation of a panel of OPCML variants with representative clinical mutations and demonstrate clear phenotypic effects in vitro and in vivo including changes to anchorage-independent growth, interaction with activated cognate receptor tyrosine kinases, cellular migration, invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that clinically occurring somatic missense mutations in OPCML have the potential to contribute to tumorigenesis in a variety of cancers.

Journal article

Lanyon-Hogg T, Ritzefeld M, Sefer L, Bickel JK, Rudolf A, Panyain N, Bineva-Todd G, Ocasio C, OReilly N, Siebold C, Magee AI, Tate Eet al., 2019, Acylation-coupled lipophilic induction of polarisation (Acyl-cLIP): a universal assay for lipid transferase and hydrolase enzymes, Chemical Science, Vol: 10, Pages: 8995-9000, ISSN: 2041-6520

Posttranslational attachment of lipids to proteins is important for many cellular functions, and the enzymes responsible for these modifications are implicated in many diseases, from cancer to neurodegeneration. Lipid transferases and hydrolases are increasingly tractable therapeutic targets, but present unique challenges for high-throughput biochemical enzyme assays which hinder development of new inhibitors. We present Acylation-coupled Lipophilic Induction of Polarisation (Acyl-cLIP) as the first universally applicable biochemical lipidation assay, exploiting the hydrophobic nature of lipidated peptides to drive a polarised fluorescence readout. Acyl-cLIP allows sensitive, accurate, real-time measurement of S- or N-palmitoylation, N-myristoylation, S-farnesylation or S-geranylgeranylation. Furthermore, it is applicable to transfer and hydrolysis reactions, and we demonstrate its extension to a high-throughput screening format. We anticipate that Acyl-cLIP will greatly expedite future drug discovery efforts against these challenging targets.

Journal article

Kallemeijn W, Lueg G, Faronato M, Hadavizadeh K, Goya Grocin A, Song O-R, Howell M, Dinnis C, Tate Eet al., 2019, Validation and invalidation of chemical probes for the human N-myristoyltransferases, Cell Chemical Biology, Vol: 26, Pages: 892-900, ISSN: 2451-9456

On-target, cell-active chemical probes are of fundamental importance in both chemical and cell biology, whereas the application of poorly-characterised probes often leads to invalid conclusions.Human N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) has attracted increasing interest as a target in cancer and infectious diseases; here we report an in-depth comparison of five compounds widely applied as human NMT inhibitors, using a combination of quantitative whole-proteome N-myristoylation profiling, biochemical enzyme assays, cytotoxicity, in-cell protein synthesis and cell cycle assays. We find that N-myristoylation is unaffected by 2-hydroxymyristic acid (100 μM), D-NMAPPD (30 μM) or Tris-DBA palladium (10 μM), with the latter compounds causing cytotoxicity through mechanisms unrelated to NMT. In contrast, drug-like inhibitors IMP-366 (DDD85646) and IMP-1088 delivered complete and specific inhibition of N-myristoylation in a range of cell lines at 1 μM and 100 nM, respectively. This study enables the selection of appropriate on-target probes for future studies and suggests the need for reassessment of previous studies which used off-target compounds.

Journal article

Storck Saha E, Morales Sanfrutos J, Serwa R, Panyain N, Lanyon-Hogg T, Tolmachova T, Ventimiglia L, Martin-Serrano J, Seabra M, Wojciak-Stothard B, Tate Eet al., 2019, Dual chemical probes enable quantitative system-wide analysis of protein prenylation and prenylation dynamics, Nature Chemistry, Vol: 11, Pages: 552-561, ISSN: 1755-4330

Post-translational farnesylation or geranylgeranylation at a C-terminal cysteine residue regulates the localization and function of over 100 proteins, including the Ras isoforms, and is a therapeutic target in diseases including cancer and infection. Here, we report global and selective profiling of prenylated proteins in living cells enabled by the development of isoprenoid analogues YnF and YnGG in combination with quantitative chemical proteomics. Eighty prenylated proteins were identified in a single human cell line, 64 for the first time at endogenous abundance without metabolic perturbation. We further demonstrate that YnF and YnGG enable direct identification of post-translationally processed prenylated peptides, proteome-wide quantitative analysis of prenylation dynamics and alternative prenylation in response to four different prenyltransferase inhibitors, and quantification of defective Rab prenylation in a model of the retinal degenerative disease choroideremia.

Journal article

Jamshidiha M, Pérez-Dorado I, Murray JW, Tate EW, Cota E, Read RJet al., 2019, Coping with strong translational noncrystallographic symmetry and extreme anisotropy in molecular replacement with Phaser: human Rab27a, Acta Crystallographica Section D Structural Biology, Vol: 75, Pages: 342-353, ISSN: 2059-7983

Data pathologies caused by effects such as diffraction anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry (tNCS) can dramatically complicate the solution of the crystal structures of macromolecules. Such problems were encountered in determining the structure of a mutant form of Rab27a, a member of the Rab GTPases. Mutant Rab27a constructs that crystallize in the free form were designed for use in the discovery of drugs to reduce primary tumour invasiveness and metastasis. One construct, hRab27a<jats:sup>Mut</jats:sup>, crystallized within 24 h and diffracted to 2.82 Å resolution, with a unit cell possessing room for a large number of protein copies. Initial efforts to solve the structure using molecular replacement by <jats:italic>Phaser</jats:italic> were not successful. Analysis of the data set revealed that the crystals suffered from both extreme anisotropy and strong tNCS. As a result, large numbers of reflections had estimated standard deviations that were much larger than their measured intensities and their expected intensities, revealing problems with the use of such data at the time in <jats:italic>Phaser</jats:italic>. By eliminating extremely weak reflections with the largest combined effects of anisotropy and tNCS, these problems could be avoided, allowing a molecular-replacement solution to be found. The lessons that were learned in solving this structure have guided improvements in the numerical analysis used in <jats:italic>Phaser</jats:italic>, particularly in identifying diffraction measurements that convey very little information content. The calculation of information content could also be applied as an alternative to ellipsoidal truncation. The post-mortem analysis also revealed an oversight in accounting for measurement errors in the fast rotation function. While the crystal of mutant Rab27a is not amenable to drug screening, the structure can guide new modifications to obtain more sui

Journal article

Hong WD, Benayoud F, Nixon GL, Ford L, Johnston KL, Clare RH, Cassidy A, Cook DAN, Siu A, Shiotani M, Webborn PJH, Kavanagh S, Aljayyoussi G, Murphy E, Steven A, Archer J, Struever D, Frohberger SJ, Ehrens A, Huebner MP, Hoerauf A, Roberts AP, Hubbard ATM, Tate EW, Serwa RA, Leung SC, Qie L, Berry NG, Gusovsky F, Hemingway J, Turner JD, Taylor MJ, Ward SA, O'Neill PMet al., 2019, AWZ1066S, a highly specific anti-Wolbachia drug candidate for a short-course treatment of filariasis, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol: 116, Pages: 1414-1419, ISSN: 0027-8424

Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are two neglected tropical diseases that together affect ∼157 million people and inflict severe disability. Both diseases are caused by parasitic filarial nematodes with elimination efforts constrained by the lack of a safe drug that can kill the adult filaria (macrofilaricide). Previous proof-of-concept human trials have demonstrated that depleting >90% of the essential nematode endosymbiont bacterium, Wolbachia, using antibiotics, can lead to permanent sterilization of adult female parasites and a safe macrofilaricidal outcome. AWZ1066S is a highly specific anti-Wolbachia candidate selected through a lead optimization program focused on balancing efficacy, safety and drug metabolism/pharmacokinetic (DMPK) features of a thienopyrimidine/quinazoline scaffold derived from phenotypic screening. AWZ1066S shows superior efficacy to existing anti-Wolbachia therapies in validated preclinical models of infection and has DMPK characteristics that are compatible with a short therapeutic regimen of 7 days or less. This candidate molecule is well-positioned for onward development and has the potential to make a significant impact on communities affected by filariasis.

Journal article

Kaiser N, Mejuch T, Fedoryshchak R, Janning P, Tate EW, Waldmann Het al., 2019, Photoactivatable Myristic Acid Probes for UNC119-Cargo Interactions, CHEMBIOCHEM, Vol: 20, Pages: 134-139, ISSN: 1439-4227

Journal article

Goya Grocin A, Serwa R, Morales Sanfrutos J, Ritzefeld M, Tate Eet al., 2019, Whole proteome profiling of N-myristoyltransferase activity and inhibition using Sortase A, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, Vol: 18, Pages: 115-126, ISSN: 1535-9476

N-myristoylation is the covalent addition of a 14-carbon saturated fatty acid (myristate) to the N-terminal glycine of specific protein substrates by N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) and plays an important role in protein regulation by controlling localization, stability, and interactions. We developed a novel method for whole-proteome profiling of free N-terminal glycines through labeling with S. Aureus sortase A (SrtA) and used it for assessment of target engagement by an NMT inhibitor. Analysis of the SrtA-labeling pattern with an engineered biotinylated depsipeptide SrtA substrate (Biotin-ALPET-Haa, Haa = 2-hydroxyacetamide) enabled whole proteome identification and quantification of de novo generated N-terminal Gly proteins in response to NMT inhibition by nanoLC-MS/MS proteomics, and was confirmed for specific substrates across multiple cell lines by gel-based analyses and ELISA. To achieve optimal signal over background noise we introduce a novel and generally applicable improvement to the biotin/avidin affinity enrichment step by chemically dimethylating commercial NeutrAvidin resin and combining this with two-step LysC on-bead/trypsin off-bead digestion, effectively eliminating avidin-derived tryptic peptides and enhancing identification of enriched peptides. We also report SrtA substrate specificity in whole-cell lysates for the first time, confirming SrtA promiscuity beyond its recognized preference for N-terminal glycine, and its usefulness as a tool for unbiased labeling of N-terminal glycine-containing proteins. Our new methodology is complementary to metabolic tagging strategies, providing the first approach for whole proteome gain-of signal readout for NMT inhibition in complex samples which are not amenable to metabolic tagging.

Journal article

Furniss RCD, Low WW, Mavridou DAI, Dagley LF, Webb AI, Tate E, Clements Aet al., 2018, Plasma membrane profiling during enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection reveals that the metalloprotease StcE cleaves CD55 from host epithelial surfaces, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol: 293, Pages: 17188-17199, ISSN: 0021-9258

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is one of several E. coli pathotypes that infect the intestinal tract and cause disease. Formation of the characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion on the surface of infected cells causes significant remodelling of the host cell surface, however limited information is available about changes at the protein level. Here we employed "plasma membrane profiling", a quantitative cell-surface proteomics technique, to identify host proteins whose cell-surface levels are altered during infection. Using this method, we quantified more than 1100 proteins, 280 of which showed altered cell-surface levels after exposure to EHEC. 22 host proteins were significantly reduced on the surface of infected epithelial cells. These included both known and unknown targets of EHEC infection. The complement decay-accelerating factor CD55 exhibited the greatest reduction in cell surface levels during infection. We showed by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis that CD55 is cleaved from the cell surface by the EHEC-specific protease StcE, and found that StcE-mediated CD55 cleavage results in increased neutrophil adhesion to the apical surface of intestinal epithelial cells. This suggests that StcE alters host epithelial surfaces to depress neutrophil transepithelial migration during infection. This work is the first report of the global manipulation of the epithelial cell surface by a bacterial pathogen and illustrates the power of quantitative cell-surface proteomics in uncovering critical aspects of bacterial infection biology.

Journal article

Wang Z, Grosskurth SE, Cheung T, Petteruti P, Zhang J, Wang X, Wang W, Gharahdaghi F, Wu J, Su N, Howard RT, Mayo M, Widzowski D, Scott DA, Johannes JW, Lamb ML, Lawson D, Dry JR, Lyne PD, Tate EW, Zinda M, Mikule K, Fawell SE, Reimer C, Chen Het al., Pharmacological inhibition of PARP6 triggers multipolar spindle formation and demonstrates therapeutic effects in breast cancer, Cancer Research, Vol: 78, Pages: 6691-6702, ISSN: 1538-7445

PARP proteins represent a class of post-translational modification enzymes with diverse cellular functions. Targeting PARPs has proven to be efficacious clinically, but exploration of the therapeutic potential of PARP inhibition has been limited to targeting poly(ADP-ribose) generating PARP, including PARP1/2/3 and tankyrases. The cancer-related functions of mono(ADP-ribose) generating PARP, including PARP6, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report a novel therapeutic strategy targeting PARP6 using the first reported PARP6 inhibitors. By screening a collection of PARP compounds for their ability to induce mitotic defects, we uncovered a robust correlation between PARP6 inhibition and induction of multipolar spindle (MPS) formation, which was phenocopied by PARP6 knockdown. Treatment with AZ0108, a PARP6 inhibitor with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, potently induced the MPS phenotype, leading to apoptosis in a subset of breast cancer cells in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. In addition, Chk1 was identified as a specific substrate of PARP6 and was further confirmed by enzymatic assays and by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, when modification of Chk1 was inhibited with AZ0108 in breast cancer cells, we observed marked upregulation of p-S345 Chk1 accompanied by defects in mitotic signaling. Together, these results establish proof-of-concept antitumor efficacy through PARP6 inhibition and highlight a novel function of PARP6 in maintaining centrosome integrity via direct ADP-ribosylation of Chk1 and modulation of its activity.

Journal article

De Vita E, Schuler P, Lovell S, Lohbeck J, Kullmann S, Rabinovich E, Sananes A, Hessling B, Hamon V, Papo N, Hess J, Tate EW, Gunkel N, Miller AKet al., 2018, Depsipeptides Featuring a Neutral P1 Are Potent Inhibitors of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 6 with On-Target Cellular Activity, JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 61, Pages: 8859-8874, ISSN: 0022-2623

Journal article

Benns HJ, Tate EW, Child MA, 2018, Activity-Based Protein Profiling for the Study of Parasite Biology., Curr Top Microbiol Immunol, Vol: 420, Pages: 155-174, ISSN: 0070-217X

Parasites exist within most ecological niches, often transitioning through biologically and chemically complex host environments over the course of their parasitic life cycles. While the development of technologies for genetic engineering has revolutionised the field of functional genomics, parasites have historically been less amenable to such modification. In light of this, parasitologists have often been at the forefront of adopting new small-molecule technologies, repurposing drugs into biological tools and probes. Over the last decade, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) has evolved into a powerful and versatile chemical proteomic platform for characterising the function of enzymes. Central to ABPP is the use of activity-based probes (ABPs), which covalently modify the active sites of enzyme classes ranging from serine hydrolases to glycosidases. The application of ABPP to cellular systems has contributed vastly to our knowledge on the fundamental biology of a diverse range of organisms and has facilitated the identification of potential drug targets in many pathogens. In this chapter, we provide a comprehensive review on the different forms of ABPP that have been successfully applied to parasite systems, and highlight key biological insights that have been enabled through their application.

Journal article

Beard R, Singh N, Grundschober C, Gee AD, Tate EWet al., 2018, High-yielding 18F radiosynthesis of a novel oxytocin receptor tracer, a probe for nose-to-brain oxytocin uptake in vivo, Chemical Communications, Vol: 54, Pages: 8120-8123, ISSN: 1359-7345

A novel Al18F labelled peptide tracer for PET imaging of oxytocin receptor has been accessed through a high radiochemical yield approach. This tracer showed comparable affinity and higher selectivity and stability compared to oxytocin, and was used to demonstrate direct nose-to-brain uptake following intranasal administration, a common yet controversial delivery route for oxytocin-based therapeutics.

Journal article

Beard R, Stucki A, Schmitt M, Py G, Grundschober C, Gee A, Tate EWet al., 2018, Building bridges for highly selective, potent and stable oxytocin and vasopressin analogs, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Vol: 26, Pages: 3039-3045, ISSN: 0968-0896

Oxytocin (OT) is an exciting potential therapeutic agent, but it is highly sensitive to modification and suffers extensive degradation at elevated temperature and in vivo. Here we report studies towards OT analogs with favorable selectivity, affinity and potency towards the oxytocin receptor (OTR), in addition to improving stability of the peptide by bridging the disulfide region with substituted dibromo-xylene analogs. We found a sensitive structure-activity relationship in which meta-cyclized analogs (dOTmeta) gave highest affinity (50 nM Ki), selectivity (34-fold), and agonist potency (34 nM EC50, 87-fold selectivity) towards OTR. Surprisingly, ortho-cyclized analogs demonstrated OTR and vasopressin V1a receptor subtype affinity (220 nM and 69 nM, respectively) and pharmacological activity (294 nM and 35 nM, respectively). V1a binding and selectivity for ortho-cyclized peptides could be improved 6-fold by substituting a neutral residue at position 8 with a basic amino acid, providing potent antagonists (14 nM IC50) that displayed no activation of the OTR. Furthermore, xylene-bridged analogs demonstrated increased stability compared to OT at elevated temperature, demonstrating promising therapeutic potential for these analogs which warrants further study.

Journal article

Riviere F, Dian C, Perez-Dorado I, Ritzefeld M, Shen J, Cota E, Meinnel T, Tate EW, Giglione Cet al., 2018, Mechanistic insight into HsNMT1-mediated acylation, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 421-422, ISSN: 2211-5463

Conference paper

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