Imperial College London

Dr Frédéric B. Piel

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3346f.piel

 
 
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Location

 

Praed StreetSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Wang:2017:10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31833-0,
author = {Wang, H and Abajobir, A and Abate, KH and Rawaf, S and Murray, CGL and GBD, 2016 Mortality Collaborators},
doi = {10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31833-0},
journal = {The Lancet},
pages = {1084--1150},
title = {Global, regional, and national under-5 mortality, adultmortality, age-specific mortality, and life expectancy,1970–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden ofDisease Study 2016},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31833-0},
volume = {390},
year = {2017}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - BackgroundDetailed assessments of mortality patterns, particularly age-specific mortality, represent a crucial input that enables health systems to target interventions to specific populations. Understanding how all-cause mortality has changed with respect to development status can identify exemplars for best practice. To accomplish this, the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) estimated age-specific and sex-specific all-cause mortality between 1970 and 2016 for 195 countries and territories and at the subnational level for the five countries with a population greater than 200 million in 2016.MethodsWe have evaluated how well civil registration systems captured deaths using a set of demographic methods called death distribution methods for adults and from consideration of survey and census data for children younger than 5 years. We generated an overall assessment of completeness of registration of deaths by dividing registered deaths in each location-year by our estimate of all-age deaths generated from our overall estimation process. For 163 locations, including subnational units in countries with a population greater than 200 million with complete vital registration (VR) systems, our estimates were largely driven by the observed data, with corrections for small fluctuations in numbers and estimation for recent years where there were lags in data reporting (lags were variable by location, generally between 1 year and 6 years). For other locations, we took advantage of different data sources available to measure under-5 mortality rates (U5MR) using complete birth histories, summary birth histories, and incomplete VR with adjustments; we measured adult mortality rate (the probability of death in individuals aged 15–60 years) using adjusted incomplete VR, sibling histories, and household death recall. We used the U5MR and adult mortality rate, together with crude death rate due to HIV in the GBD model life table system, to
AU - Wang,H
AU - Abajobir,A
AU - Abate,KH
AU - Rawaf,S
AU - Murray,CGL
AU - GBD,2016 Mortality Collaborators
DO - 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31833-0
EP - 1150
PY - 2017///
SN - 0140-6736
SP - 1084
TI - Global, regional, and national under-5 mortality, adultmortality, age-specific mortality, and life expectancy,1970–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden ofDisease Study 2016
T2 - The Lancet
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31833-0
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/50664
VL - 390
ER -