Imperial College London

ProfessorGaryFrost

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Chair in Nutrition and Dietetics
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 8037g.frost Website

 
 
//

Location

 

Commonwealth BiuldingHammersmith HospitalHammersmith Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

342 results found

Brooks L, Viardot A, Tsakmaki A, Stolarczyk E, Howard JK, Cani PD, Everard A, Sleeth ML, Psichas A, Anastasovskaj J, Bell JD, Bell-Anderson K, Mackay CR, Ghatei MA, Bloom SR, Frost G, Bewick GAet al., 2017, Fermentable carbohydrate stimulates FFAR2-dependent colonic PYY cell expansion to increase satiety, MOLECULAR METABOLISM, Vol: 6, Pages: 48-60, ISSN: 2212-8778

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Brown A, Guess N, Dornhorst A, Taheri S, Frost Get al., 2017, Insulin-associated weight gain in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: What can be done?, Diabetes Obes Metab

Insulin therapy (IT) is initiated for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when glycaemic targets are not met with diet and other hypoglycaemic agents. The initiation of IT improves glycaemic control and reduces the risk of microvascular complications. There is, however, an associated weight gain following IT, which may adversely affect diabetic and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A 3 to 9 kg insulin-associated weight gain (IAWG) is reported to occur in the first year of initiating IT, predominantly caused by adipose tissue. The potential causes for this weight gain include an increase in energy intake linked to a fear of hypoglycaemia, a reduction in glycosuria, catch-up weight, and central effects on weight and appetite regulation. Patients with type 2 diabetes who are receiving IT often have multiple co-morbidities, including obesity, that are exacerbated by weight gain, making the management of their diabetes and obesity challenging. There are several treatment strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes, who require IT, that attenuate weight gain, help improve glycaemic control, and help promote body weight homeostasis. This review addresses the effects of insulin initiation and intensification on IAWG, and explores its potential underlying mechanisms, the predictors for this weight gain, and the available treatment options for managing and limiting weight gain.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cheung W, Keski-Rahkonen P, Assi N, Ferrari P, Freisling H, Rinaldi S, Slimani N, Zamora-Ros R, Rundle M, Frost G, Gibbons H, Carr E, Brennan L, Cross AJ, Pala V, Panico S, Sacerdote C, Palli D, Tumino R, Kuehn T, Kaaks R, Boeing H, Floegel A, Mancini F, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Baglietto L, Trichopoulou A, Naska A, Orfanos P, Scalbert Aet al., 2017, A metabolomic study of biomarkers of meat and fish intake, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 105, Pages: 600-608, ISSN: 0002-9165

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Clar C, Al-Khudairy L, Loveman E, Kelly SAM, Hartley L, Flowers N, Germano R, Frost G, Rees Ket al., 2017, Low glycaemic index diets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, ISSN: 1469-493X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Fiamoncini J, Yiorkas AM, Gedrich K, Rundle M, Alsters SI, Roeselers G, van den Broek TJ, Clavel T, Lagkouvardos I, Wopereis S, Frost G, van Ommen B, Blakemore AI, Daniel Het al., 2017, Determinants of postprandial plasma bile acid kinetics in human volunteers., Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol, Vol: 313, Pages: G300-G312

Bile acids (BA) are signaling molecules with a wide range of biological effects, also identified among the most responsive plasma metabolites in the postprandial state. We here describe this response to different dietary challenges and report on key determinants linked to its interindividual variability. Healthy men and women (n = 72, 62 ± 8 yr, mean ± SE) were enrolled into a 12-wk weight loss intervention. All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test and a mixed-meal tolerance test before and after the intervention. BA were quantified in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry combined with whole genome exome sequencing and fecal microbiota profiling. Considering the average response of all 72 subjects, no effect of the successful weight loss intervention was found on plasma BA profiles. Fasting and postprandial BA profiles revealed high interindividual variability, and three main patterns in postprandial BA response were identified using multivariate analysis. Although the women enrolled were postmenopausal, effects of sex difference in BA response were evident. Exome data revealed the contribution of preselected genes to the observed interindividual variability. In particular, a variant in the SLCO1A2 gene, encoding the small intestinal BA transporter organic anion-transporting polypeptide-1A2 (OATP1A2), was associated with delayed postprandial BA increases. Fecal microbiota analysis did not reveal evidence for a significant influence of bacterial diversity and/or composition on plasma BA profiles. The analysis of plasma BA profiles in response to two different dietary challenges revealed a high interindividual variability, which was mainly determined by genetics and sex difference of host with minimal effects of the microbiota.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Considering the average response of all 72 subjects, no effect of the successful weight loss intervention was found on plasma bile acid (BA) profiles. Despite high interindividu

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Garcia-Perez I, Posma JM, Gibson R, Chambers ES, Hansen TH, Vestergaard H, Hansen T, Beckmann M, Pedersen O, Elliott P, Stamler J, Nicholson JK, Draper J, Mathers JC, Holmes E, Frost Get al., 2017, Objective assessment of dietary patterns by use of metabolic phenotyping: a randomised, controlled, crossover trial, LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, Vol: 5, Pages: 184-195, ISSN: 2213-8587

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gibbons H, Michielsen CJR, Rundle M, Frost G, McNulty BA, Nugent AP, Walton J, Flynn A, Gibney MJ, Brennan Let al., 2017, Demonstration of the utility of biomarkers for dietary intake assessment; proline betaine as an example., Mol Nutr Food Res, Vol: 61

SCOPE: There is a dearth of studies demonstrating the use of dietary biomarkers for determination of food intake. The objective of this study was to develop calibration curves for use in quantifying citrus intakes in an independent cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: Participants (n = 50) from the NutriTech food-intake study consumed standardized breakfasts for three consecutive days over three consecutive weeks. Orange juice intake decreased over the weeks. Urine samples were analyzed by NMR-spectroscopy and proline betaine was quantified and normalized to osmolality. Calibration curves were developed and used to predict citrus intake in an independent cohort; the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) (n = 565). Proline betaine displayed a dose-response relationship to orange juice intake in 24 h and fasting samples (p < 0.001). In a test set, predicted orange juice intakes displayed excellent agreement with true intake. There were significant associations between predicted intake measured in 24 h and fasting samples and true intake (r = 0.710-0.919). Citrus intakes predicted for the NANS cohort demonstrated good agreement with self-reported intake and this agreement improved following normalization to osmolality. CONCLUSION: The developed calibration curves successfully predicted citrus intakes in an independent cohort. Expansion of this approach to other foods will be important for the development of objective intake measurements.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Kelly SAM, Hartley L, Loveman E, Colquitt JL, Jones HM, Al-Khudairy L, Clar C, Germano R, Lunn HR, Frost G, Rees Ket al., 2017, Whole grain cereals for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, ISSN: 1469-493X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

O'Gorman A, Gibbons H, Ryan MF, Gibney ER, Gibney MJ, Frost GS, Roche HM, Brennan Let al., 2017, Exploring the Links between Diet and Health in an Irish Cohort: A Lipidomic Approach, JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH, Vol: 16, Pages: 1280-1287, ISSN: 1535-3893

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pingitore A, Chambers ES, Hill T, Maldonado IR, Liu B, Bewick G, Morrison DJ, Preston T, Wallis GA, Tedford C, Gonzalez RC, Huang GC, Choudhary P, Frost G, Persaud SJet al., 2017, The diet-derived short chain fatty acid propionate improves beta-cell function in humans and stimulates insulin secretion from human islets in vitro, DIABETES OBESITY & METABOLISM, Vol: 19, Pages: 257-265, ISSN: 1462-8902

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Posma JM, Garcia-Perez I, Heaton JC, Burdisso P, Mathers JC, Draper J, Lewis M, Lindon JC, Frost G, Holmes E, Nicholson JKet al., 2017, Integrated Analytical and Statistical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy Strategy for Metabolite Identification: Application to Dietary Biomarkers, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 89, Pages: 3300-3309, ISSN: 0003-2700

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Yin X, Gibbons H, Rundle M, Frost G, McNulty BA, Nugent AP, Walton J, Flynn A, Gibney MJ, Brennan Let al., 2017, Estimation of Chicken Intake by Adults Using Metabolomics-Derived Markers., J Nutr

Background: Improved assessment of meat intake with the use of metabolomics-derived markers can provide objective data and could be helpful in clarifying proposed associations between meat intake and health.Objective: The objective of this study was to identify novel markers of chicken intake using a metabolomics approach and use markers to determine intake in an independent cohort.Methods: Ten participants [age: 62 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 28.25] in the NutriTech food intake study consumed increasing amounts of chicken, from 88 to 290 g/d, in a 3-wk span. Urine and blood samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, respectively. A multivariate data analysis was performed to identify markers associated with chicken intake. A calibration curve was built based on dose-response association using NutriTech data. A Bland-Altman analysis evaluated the agreement between reported and calculated chicken intake in a National Adult Nutrition Survey cohort.Results: Multivariate data analysis of postprandial and fasting urine samples collected in participants in the NutriTech study revealed good discrimination between high (290 g/d) and low (88 g/d) chicken intakes. Urinary metabolite profiles showed differences in metabolite levels between low and high chicken intakes. Examining metabolite profiles revealed that guanidoacetate increased from 1.47 to 3.66 mmol/L following increasing chicken intakes from 88 to 290 g/d (P < 0.01). Using a calibration curve developed from the NutriTech study, chicken intake was calculated through the use of data from the National Adult Nutrition Survey, in which consumers of chicken had a higher guanidoacetate excretion (0.70 mmol/L) than did nonconsumers (0.47 mmol/L; P < 0.01). A Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement between reported and calculated intakes, with a bias of -30.2 g/d. Plasma metabolite analysis demonstrated that 3-methylhistidine was a more suitable indicator of chicken intake tha

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Albar SA, Alwan NA, Evans CEL, Greenwood DC, Cade JEet al., 2016, Agreement between an online dietary assessment tool (myfood24) and an interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall in British adolescents aged 11-18 years, BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, Vol: 115, Pages: 1678-1686, ISSN: 0007-1145

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Beckmann M, Joosen AM, Clarke MM, Mugridge O, Frost G, Engel B, Taillart K, Lloyd AJ, Draper J, Lodge JKet al., 2016, Changes in the human plasma and urinary metabolome associated with acute dietary exposure to sucrose and the identification of potential biomarkers of sucrose intake, MOLECULAR NUTRITION & FOOD RESEARCH, Vol: 60, Pages: 444-457, ISSN: 1613-4125

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Boyd SE, Charani E, Lyons T, Frost G, Holmes AHet al., 2016, Information provision for antibacterial dosing in the obese patient: a sizeable absence?, JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMOTHERAPY, Vol: 71, Pages: 3588-3592, ISSN: 0305-7453

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Brown AC, Taheri S, Dornhorst A, Kapoor N, McGowan B, Leeds AR, Frost Get al., 2016, Using a low energy formula diet in obese patients with long-standing insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes produces significantly greater weight loss, improvement in glucose control and insulin reductions compared to gold standard clinical care over a 12 week period, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 33, Pages: 69-69, ISSN: 0742-3071

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Byrne CS, Chambers ES, Alhabeeb H, Chhina N, Morrison DJ, Preston T, Tedford C, Fitzpatrick J, Irani C, Busza A, Garcia-Perez I, Fountana S, Holmes E, Goldstone AP, Frost GSet al., 2016, Increased colonic propionate reduces anticipatory reward responses in the human striatum to high-energy foods, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 104, Pages: 5-14, ISSN: 0002-9165

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Carter MC, Hancock N, Albar SA, Brown H, Greenwood DC, Hardie LJ, Frost GS, Wark PA, Cade JEet al., 2016, Development of a New Branded UK Food Composition Database for an Online Dietary Assessment Tool, NUTRIENTS, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2072-6643

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Darzi J, Frost GS, Swann JR, Costabile A, Robertson MDet al., 2016, L-rhamnose as a source of colonic propionate inhibits insulin secretion but does not influence measures of appetite or food intake, APPETITE, Vol: 98, Pages: 142-149, ISSN: 0195-6663

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Garcia-Perez I, Posma JM, Chambers ES, Nicholson JK, Mathers JC, Beckmann M, Draper J, Holmes E, Frost Get al., 2016, An Analytical Pipeline for Quantitative Characterization of Dietary Intake: Application To Assess Grape Intake, JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, Vol: 64, Pages: 2423-2431, ISSN: 0021-8561

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gibbons H, Carr E, Frost GS, McNulty BA, Nugent AP, Walton J, Flynn A, Gibney MJ, Brennan Let al., 2016, Metabolomic based identification of clusters that reflect dietary patterns, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, Vol: 75, Pages: E175-E175, ISSN: 0029-6651

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gibson R, Eriksen R, Chan Q, Vergnaud AC, Singh D, Heard A, Spear J, Aresu M, McRobie D, Elliott P, Frost Get al., 2016, Sex differences in the relationship between work patterns and diet in British police force employees: a nested cross-sectional study, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, Vol: 75, Pages: E20-E20, ISSN: 0029-6651

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Griep LMO, Chekmeneva E, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Chan Q, Ebbels TMD, Holmes E, Frost GS, Elliott Pet al., 2016, Urinary hippurate and proline betaine relative to fruit intake, blood pressure, and body mass index, Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, Pages: E178-E178, ISSN: 0029-6651

CONFERENCE PAPER

Guess ND, Dornhorst A, Oliver N, Frost GSet al., 2016, A Randomised Crossover Trial: The Effect of Inulin on Glucose Homeostasis in Subtypes of Prediabetes, ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM, Vol: 68, Pages: 26-34, ISSN: 0250-6807

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hettiarachchi P, Wickremasinghe AR, Frost GS, Deen KI, Pathirana AA, Murphy KG, Jayaratne SDet al., 2016, Resection of the Large Bowel Suppresses Hunger and Food Intake and Modulates Gastrointestinal Fermentation, OBESITY, Vol: 24, Pages: 1723-1730, ISSN: 1930-7381

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lee S, Norheim F, Langleite TM, Noreng HJ, Storas TH, Afman LA, Frost G, Bell JD, Thomas EL, Kolnes KJ, Tangen DS, Stadheim HK, Gilfillan GD, Gulseth HL, Birkeland KI, Jensen J, Drevon CA, Holen Tet al., 2016, Effect of energy restriction and physical exercise intervention on phenotypic flexibility as examined by transcriptomics analyses of mRNA from adipose tissue and whole body magnetic resonance imaging, PHYSIOLOGICAL REPORTS, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2051-817X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lloyd AJ, Zubair H, Willis ND, Wilson T, Xie L, Tailliart K, Chambers ES, Garcia-Perez I, Holmes E, Frost G, Mathers JC, Beckmann M, Draper Jet al., 2016, Quantification of dietary biomarkers in spot urine samples reflects the intake of foods of UK high public health importance, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, Vol: 75, Pages: E248-E248, ISSN: 0029-6651

JOURNAL ARTICLE

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00330288&limit=30&person=true