Imperial College London

Dr George Garas

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Clinical Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

g.garas

 
 
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Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

67 results found

Garas G, Wou C, Sawyer J, Amygdalos I, Gould Set al., 2011, Acute oesophageal necrosis syndrome., BMJ Case Rep, Vol: 2011

An 89-year-old woman with a known hiatus hernia presented to the accident and emergency department with acute onset epigastric pain. CT of the thorax and abdomen revealed a large hiatus hernia with mesentero-axial volvulus but no evidence of strangulation. A large aneurysmal aortic arch and descending aorta were visible with associated mural thrombus. As the pain was worsening, following discussion with the patient, the decision to operate was taken. The hiatus hernia was successfully reduced and the stomach looked healthy. The oesophagus, however, appeared black almost throughout its entire length consistent with acute oesophageal necrosis syndrome, a rare and lethal disease. Left lateral thoracotomy followed by cervicotomy was performed to retrieve a healthy oesophageal segment, which was anastomosed to the cardiac end of the stomach. Despite treatment in the intensive care unit, the patient's condition progressively deteriorated and she died of multiorgan failure 12 days later.

Journal article

Garas G, Wou C, Sawyer J, Amygdalos I, Gould Set al., 2011, Acute oesophageal necrosis syndrome, BMJ Case Reports

An 89-year-old woman with a known hiatus hernia presented to the accident and emergency department with acute onset epigastric pain. CT of the thorax and abdomen revealed a large hiatus hernia with mesentero-axial volvulus but no evidence of strangulation. A large aneurysmal aortic arch and descending aorta were visible with associated mural thrombus. As the pain was worsening, following discussion with the patient, the decision to operate was taken. The hiatus hernia was successfully reduced and the stomach looked healthy. The oesophagus, however, appeared black almost throughout its entire length consistent with acute oesophageal necrosis syndrome, a rare and lethal disease. Left lateral thoracotomy followed by cervicotomy was performed to retrieve a healthy oesophageal segment, which was anastomosed to the cardiac end of the stomach. Despite treatment in the intensive care unit, the patient's condition progressively deteriorated and she died of multiorgan failure 12 days later. Copyright 2011 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Garas G, Choudhury N, Prasad N, Tatla Tet al., 2010, Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the tongue base., JRSM Short Rep, Vol: 1

Journal article

Garas G, Choudhury N, Farrell R, 2010, Invasive fatal rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis in diabetic ketoacidosis., JRSM Short Rep, Vol: 1

Journal article

Garas G, Ifeacho S, Millard R, Tolley Net al., 2010, Melioidosis and the vacuum-assisted closure device: a rare cause of a discharging neck wound, and a new approach to management, JOURNAL OF LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, Vol: 124, Pages: 1021-1024, ISSN: 0022-2151

Journal article

Georgalas C, Garas G, Hadjihannas E, Oostra Aet al., 2010, Assessment of obstruction level and selection of patients for obstructive sleep apnoea surgery: an evidence-based approach, JOURNAL OF LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, Vol: 124, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0022-2151

Journal article

Garas G, Stacey-Clear A, Whitaker S, Collyer Jet al., 2009, An atypical presentation of breast cancer metastasis., BMJ Case Rep, Vol: 2009

A 78-year-old woman heard a crack in her left mandible while eating a biscuit and reported to her dentist, who urgently referred her to the oral and maxillofacial surgery department. On examination she had a lesion in the body of her left mandible, which had eroded through the lower border and caused a pathological fracture. Her past medical history included a left mastectomy and level II axillary lymph node dissection for a 27 mm grade III invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast 9 months prior to her mandibular fracture. A transoral incisional biopsy was performed which confirmed the mandibular lesion to be an osteolytic metastasis from the breast. The metastasis was subsequently surgically removed and the remaining mandible repaired with a reconstruction plate followed by postoperative radiotherapy. The patient regained full function of her mandible and is now eating normally. She is being closely followed-up in the oncology outpatient department.

Journal article

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