Imperial College London

Dr George Garas

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Clinical Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

g.garas

 
 
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Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Garas:2017:10.1016/j.amsu.2017.06.014,
author = {Garas, G and Kythreotou, A and Georgalas, C and Arora, A and Kotecha, B and Holsinger, FC and Grant, DG and Tolley, N},
doi = {10.1016/j.amsu.2017.06.014},
journal = {Annals of Medicine and Surgery},
pages = {55--61},
title = {Is transoral robotic surgery a safe and effective multilevel treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea in obese patients following failure of conventional treatment(s)?},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2017.06.014},
volume = {19},
year = {2017}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed waswhether TransOral Robotic Surgery (TORS) is a safe and effective multilevel treatment for ObstructiveSleep Apnoea (OSA) in obese patients following failure of conventional treatment(s). A total of 39 paperswere identified using the reported searches of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer theclinical question. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and resultsare tabulated. Existing treatments for OSA - primarily CPAP - though highly effective are poorly toleratedresulting in an adherence often lower than 50%. As such, surgery is regaining momentum, especially inthose patients failing non-surgical treatment (CPAP or oral appliances). TORS represents the latestaddition to the armamentarium of Otorhinolaryngologists - Head and Neck Surgeons for the manage-ment of OSA. The superior visualisation and ergonomics render TORS ideal for the multilevel treatmentof OSA. However, not all patients are suitable candidates for TORS and its suitability is questionable inobese patients. In view of the global obesity pandemic, this is an important question that requiresaddressing promptly. Despite the drop in success rates with increasing BMI, the success rate of TORS innon-morbidly obese patients (BMI¼30-35kgm-2) exceeds 50%. A 50% success rate may atfirst seem low,but it is important to realize that this is a patient cohort suffering from a life-threatening disease and nooption left other than a tracheostomy. As such, TORS represents an important treatment in non-morbidlyobese OSA patients following failure of conventional treatment(s)
AU - Garas,G
AU - Kythreotou,A
AU - Georgalas,C
AU - Arora,A
AU - Kotecha,B
AU - Holsinger,FC
AU - Grant,DG
AU - Tolley,N
DO - 10.1016/j.amsu.2017.06.014
EP - 61
PY - 2017///
SN - 2049-0801
SP - 55
TI - Is transoral robotic surgery a safe and effective multilevel treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea in obese patients following failure of conventional treatment(s)?
T2 - Annals of Medicine and Surgery
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2017.06.014
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48979
VL - 19
ER -