Imperial College London

Professor Gary Hampson

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Earth Science & Engineering

Professor of Sedimentary Geology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6475g.j.hampson

 
 
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Location

 

1.42Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

109 results found

Armitage JJ, Burgess PM, Hampson GJ, Allen PAet al., 2018, Deciphering the origin of cyclical gravel front and shoreline progradation and retrogradation in the stratigraphic record, BASIN RESEARCH, Vol: 30, Pages: 15-35, ISSN: 0950-091X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Debbabi Y, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, Salinas Pet al., 2018, Impact of the Buoyancy–Viscous Force Balance on Two-Phase Flow in Layered Porous Media, Transport in Porous Media, Pages: 1-25, ISSN: 0169-3913

© 2018 The Author(s) Motivated by geological carbon storage and hydrocarbon recovery, the effect of buoyancy and viscous forces on the displacement of one fluid by a second immiscible fluid, along parallel and dipping layers of contrasting permeability, is characterized using five independent dimensionless numbers and a dimensionless storage or recovery efficiency. Application of simple dimensionless models shows that increased longitudinal buoyancy effects increase storage efficiency by reducing the distance between the leading edges of the injected phase in each layer and decreasing the residual displaced phase saturation behind the leading edge of the displacing phase. Increased transverse buoyancy crossflow increases storage efficiency if it competes with permeability layering effects, but reduces storage efficiency otherwise. When both longitudinal and transverse buoyancy effects are varied simultaneously, a purely geometrical dip angle group defines whether changes in storage efficiency are dominated by changes in the longitudinal or transverse buoyancy effects. In the limit of buoyancy-segregated flow, we report an equivalent, unidimensional flow model which allows rapid prediction of storage efficiency. The model presented accounts for both dip and layering, thereby generalizing earlier work which accounted for each of these but not both together. We suggest that the predicted storage efficiency can be used to compare and rank geostatistical realizations, and complements earlier heterogeneity measures which are applicable in the viscous limit.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Debbabi Y, Stern D, Hampson GJ, Jackson MDet al., 2018, Use of dimensionless scaling groups to interpret reservoir simulation results, JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, Vol: 163, Pages: 270-282, ISSN: 0920-4105

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jacquemyn C, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, John CM, Cantrell DL, Z┼▒hlke R, AbuBshait AJ, Lindsay RF, Monsen Ret al., 2018, Geometry, spatial arrangement and origin of carbonate grain-dominated, scour-fill and event-bed deposits: Late Jurassic Jubaila Formation and Arab-D Member, Saudi Arabia, Sedimentology, Vol: 65, Pages: 1043-1066, ISSN: 0037-0746

© 2017 The Authors. Sedimentology © 2017 International Association of Sedimentologists Outcrop analogues of the Late Jurassic lower Arab-D reservoir zone in Saudi Arabia expose a succession of fining-upward cycles deposited on a distal middle-ramp to outer-ramp setting. These cycles are interrupted by erosional scours that incise up to 1·8 m into underlying deposits and are infilled with intraclasts up to boulder size (1 m diameter). Scours of similar size and infill are not commonly observed on low-angle carbonate ramps. Outcrops have been used to characterize and quantify facies-body geometries and spatial relationships. The coarse grain size of scour-fills indicates scouring and boulder transport by debris or hyperconcentrated density flows strengthened by offshore-directed currents. Longitudinal and lateral flow transformation is invoked to produce the ‘pit and wing’ geometry of the scours. Scour pits and wings erode up to 1·8 m and 0·7 m deep, respectively, and are on average 50 m wide between wing tips. The flat bases of the scours and their lack of consistent aspect ratio indicate that erosion depth was limited by the presence of cemented firmgrounds in underlying cycles. Scours define slightly sinuous channels that are consistently oriented north–south, sub-parallel to the inferred regional depositional strike of the ramp, suggesting that local palaeobathymetry was more complex than commonly assumed. Weak lateral clustering of some scours indicates that they were underfilled and reoccupied by later scour incision and infill. Rudstone scour-fills required reworking of material from inner ramp by high-energy, offshore-directed flows, associated with storm action and the hydraulic gradient produced by coastal storm setup, to generate erosion and sustain transport of clasts that are generally associated with steeper slopes. Quantitative analysis indicates that these coarse-grained units ha

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Madjid MYA, Vandeginste V, Hampson G, Jordan CJ, Booth ADet al., 2018, Drones in carbonate geology: Opportunities and challenges, and application in diagenetic dolomite geobody mapping, Marine and Petroleum Geology, ISSN: 0264-8172

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Debbabi Y, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, Fitch PJR, Salinas Pet al., 2017, Viscous Crossflow in Layered Porous Media, Transport in Porous Media, Vol: 117, Pages: 281-309, ISSN: 0169-3913

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Debbabi Y, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, Salinas Pet al., 2017, Capillary Heterogeneity Trapping and Crossflow in Layered Porous Media, TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA, Vol: 120, Pages: 183-206, ISSN: 0169-3913

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hampson GJ, Howell JA, 2017, Sedimentologic and sequencestratigraphic characteristics of wave-dominated deltas, AAPG BULLETIN, Vol: 101, Pages: 441-451, ISSN: 0149-1423

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hampson GJ, Premwichein K, 2017, SEDIMENTOLOGIC CHARACTER OF ANCIENT MUDDY SUBAQUEOUS-DELTAIC CLINOFORMS: DOWN CLIFF CLAY MEMBER, BRIDPORT SAND FORMATION, WESSEX BASIN, U.K, JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, Vol: 87, Pages: 951-966, ISSN: 1527-1404

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hampson GJ, Reynolds AD, Kostic B, Wells MRet al., 2017, Introduction to the sedimentology of paralic reservoirs: recent advances, Pages: 1-6

BOOK CHAPTER

Le Blevec T, Dubrule O, John CM, Hampson GJet al., 2017, Modelling Asymmetrical Facies Successions Using Pluri-Gaussian Simulations, Editors: GomezHernandez, RodrigoIlarri, RodrigoClavero, Cassiraga, VargasGuzman, Publisher: SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, Pages: 59-75, ISBN: 978-3-319-46818-1

BOOK CHAPTER

Zhang Z, Geiger S, Rood M, Jacquemyn C, Jackson M, Hampson G, De Carvalho FM, Marques Machado Silva CC, Machado Silva JD, Sousa MCet al., 2017, A Tracing Algorithm for Flow Diagnostics on Fully Unstructured Grids With Multipoint Flux Approximation, SPE JOURNAL, Vol: 22, Pages: 1946-1962, ISSN: 1086-055X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

van Cappelle M, Ravnas R, Hampson GJ, Johnson HDet al., 2017, Depositional evolution of a progradational to aggradational, mixed-influenced deltaic succession: Jurassic Tofte and Ile formations, southern Halten Terrace, offshore Norway, MARINE AND PETROLEUM GEOLOGY, Vol: 80, Pages: 1-22, ISSN: 0264-8172

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hampson GJ, 2016, Towards a sequence stratigraphic solution set for autogenic processes and allogenic controls: Upper Cretaceous strata, Book Cliffs, Utah, USA, JOURNAL OF THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Vol: 173, Pages: 817-836, ISSN: 0016-7649

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jordan OD, Gupta S, Hampson GJ, Johnson HDet al., 2016, PRESERVED STRATIGRAPHIC ARCHITECTURE AND EVOLUTION OF A NET-TRANSGRESSIVE MIXED WAVE- AND TIDE-INFLUENCED COASTAL SYSTEM: THE CLIFF HOUSE SANDSTONE, NORTHWESTERN NEW MEXICO, USA, JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, Vol: 86, Pages: 1399-1424, ISSN: 1527-1404

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Massart BYG, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, Johnson HDet al., 2016, Effective flow properties of heterolithic, cross-bedded tidal sandstones: Part 2. Flow simulation, AAPG BULLETIN, Vol: 100, Pages: 723-742, ISSN: 0149-1423

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Massart BYG, Jackson MD, Hampson GL, Johnson HD, Legler B, Jackson CA-Let al., 2016, Effective flow properties of heterolithic, cross-bedded tidal sandstones: Part I. Surface-based modeling, AAPG BULLETIN, Vol: 100, Pages: 697-721, ISSN: 0149-1423

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sahoo H, Gani MR, Hampson GJ, Gani ND, Ranson Aet al., 2016, Facies- to sandbody-scale heterogeneity in a tight-gas fluvial reservoir analog: Blackhawk Formation, Wasatch Plateau, Utah, USA, MARINE AND PETROLEUM GEOLOGY, Vol: 78, Pages: 48-69, ISSN: 0264-8172

JOURNAL ARTICLE

van Cappelle M, Stukins S, Hampson GJ, Johnson HDet al., 2016, Fluvial to tidal transition in proximal, mixed tide-influenced and wave-influenced deltaic deposits: Cretaceous lower Sego Sandstone, Utah, USA, SEDIMENTOLOGY, Vol: 63, Pages: 1333-1361, ISSN: 0037-0746

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Armitage JJ, Allen PA, Burgess PM, Hampson GJ, Whittaker AC, Duller RA, Michael NAet al., 2015, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR THE EOCENE ESCANILLA SEDIMENT-ROUTING SYSTEM: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UNIQUENESS OF SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC ARCHITECTURES, JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, Vol: 85, Pages: 1510-1524, ISSN: 1527-1404

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gani MR, Ranson A, Cross DB, Hampson GJ, Gani ND, Sahoo Het al., 2015, Along-strike sequence stratigraphy across the Cretaceous shallow marine to coastal-plain transition, Wasatch Plateau, Utah, U.S.A., Sedimentary Geology, Vol: 325, Pages: 59-70, ISSN: 0037-0738

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Graham GH, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, 2015, Three-dimensional modeling of clinoforms in shallow-marine reservoirs: Part 2. Impact on fluid flow and hydrocarbon recovery in fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs, AAPG Bulletin, Vol: 99, Pages: 1049-1080, ISSN: 0149-1423

© 2015. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved. Permeability contrasts associated with clinoforms have been identified as an important control on fluid flow and hydrocarbon recovery in fluvial-dominated deltaic parasequences. However, they are typically neglected in subsurface reservoir models or considered in isolation in reservoir simulation experiments because clinoforms are difficult to capture using current modeling tools. A suite of three-dimensional reservoir models constructed with a novel, stochastic, surface-based clinoform-modeling algorithm and outcrop analog data (Upper Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member, Utah) have been used here to quantify the impact of clinoforms on fluid flow in the context of (1) uncertainties in reservoir characterization, such as the presence of channelized fluvial sandbodies and the impact of bed-scale heterogeneity on vertical permeability, and (2) reservoir engineering decisions, including oil production rate. The proportion and distribution of barriers to flow along clinoforms exert the greatest influence on hydrocarbon recovery; equivalent models that neglect these barriers overpredict recovery by up to 35%. Continuity of channelized sandbodies that cut across clinoform tops and vertical permeability within distal delta-front facies influence sweep within clinothems bounded by barriers. Sweep efficiency is reduced when producing at higher rates over shorter periods, because oil is bypassed at the toe of each clinothem. Clinoforms are difficult to detect using production data, but our results indicate that they significantly influence hydrocarbon recovery and their impact is typically larger than that of other geologic heterogeneities regardless of reservoir engineering decisions. Clinoforms should therefore be included in models of fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs to accurately predict hydrocarbon recovery and drainage patterns.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Graham GH, Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, 2015, Three-dimensional modeling of clinoforms in shallow-marine reservoirs: Part 1. Concepts and application, AAPG Bulletin, Vol: 99, Pages: 1013-1047, ISSN: 0149-1423

© 2015. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved. Clinoform surfaces control aspects of facies architecture within shallow-marine parasequences and can also act as barriers or baffles to flow where they are lined by low-permeability lithologies, such as cements or mudstones. Current reservoir modeling techniques are not well suited to capturing clinoforms, particularly if they are numerous, below seismic resolution, and/or difficult to correlate between wells. At present, there are no modeling tools available to automate the generation of multiple three-dimensional clinoform surfaces using a small number of input parameters. Consequently, clinoforms are rarely incorporated in models of shallow-marine reservoirs, even when their potential impact on fluid flow is recognized. A numerical algorithm that generates multiple clinoforms within a volume defined by two bounding surfaces, such as a delta-lobe deposit or shoreface parasequence, is developed. A geometric approach is taken to construct the shape of a clinoform, combining its height relative to the bounding surfaces with a mathematical function that describes clinoform geometry. The method is flexible, allowing the user to define the progradation direction and the parameters that control the geometry and distribution of individual clinoforms. The algorithm is validated via construction of surface-based three-dimensional reservoir models of (1) fluvial-dominated delta-lobe deposits exposed at the outcrop (Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member, Utah), and (2) a sparse subsurface data set from a deltaic reservoir (Jurassic Sognefjord Formation, Troll Field, Norwegian North Sea). Resulting flow simulation results demonstrate the value of including algorithm-generated clinoforms in reservoir models, because they may significantly impact hydrocarbon recovery when associated with areally extensive barriers to flow.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Holgate NE, Jackson CA-L, Hampson GJ, Dreyer Tet al., 2015, Seismic stratigraphic analysis of the Middle Jurassic Krossfjord and Fensfjord formations, Troll oil and gas field, northern North Sea, Marine and Petroleum Geology, Vol: 68, Pages: 352-380, ISSN: 0264-8172

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jackson MD, Hampson GJ, Rood D, Geiger S, Zhang Z, Sousa MC, Amorim R, Brazil EV, Samavati FF, Guimaraes LNet al., 2015, Rapid reservoir modeling: Prototyping of reservoir models, well trajectories and development options using an intuitive, sketch-based interface, Pages: 829-845

Copyright © 2015 Society of Petroleum Engineers. Constructing or refining complex reservoir models at the appraisal, development, or production stage is a challenging and time-consuming task that entails a high degree of uncertainty. The challenge is significantly increased by the lack of modeling, simulation and visualization tools that allow prototyping of reservoir models and development concepts, and which are simple and intuitive to use. Conventional modeling workflows, facilitated by commercially available software packages, have remained essentially unchanged for the past decade. However, these are slow, often requiring many months from initial model concepts to flow simulation or other outputs; moreover, many model concepts, such as large scale reservoir architecture, become fixed early in the process and are difficult to retrospectively change. Such workflows are poorly suited to rapid prototyping of a range of reservoir model concepts, well trajectories and development options, and testing of how these might impact on reservoir behavior. We present a new reservoir modeling and simulation approach termed Rapid Reservoir Modeling (RRM) that allows such prototyping and complements existing workflows. In RRM, reservoir geometries that describe geologic heterogeneities (e.g. faults, stratigraphic, sedimentologic and/or diagenetic features) are modelled as discrete volumes bounded by surfaces, without reference to a predefined grid. These surfaces, and also well trajectories, are created and modified using intuitive, interactive techniques from computer visualization, such as Sketch Based Interfaces and Modeling (SBIM). Input data can be sourced from seismic, geocellular or flow simulation models, outcrop analogues, conceptual model libraries or blank screen. RRM outputs can be exported to conventional workflows at any stage. Gridding or meshing of the models within the RRM framework allows rapid calculation of key reservoir properties and dynamic behaviors

CONFERENCE PAPER

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