Imperial College London

Professor Goran Strbac

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Chair in Electrical Energy Systems
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6169g.strbac

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Guler Eroglu +44 (0)20 7594 6170

 
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Location

 

1101Electrical EngineeringSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Overview

My research focuses on the advanced energy system modelling, that has been widely applied to comprehensively assess cost, carbon and security performance of future low-carbon energy systems, covering all vectors and sectors of the energy  system. Our novel whole-system analysis approaches and modelling methodologies have been extensively used to inform energy industry, governments and regulatory bodies abut the technical, economic and market challenges associated with future low carbon energy systems including analysis of interaction between different energy vectors and the role and value of emerging energy technologies.

Research areas

whole-system modelling framework:

Research in this area includes investigation of new concepts, methodologies and tools for optimising short-term operation and long-term investment in future low carbon energy systems. This unique whole-system modelling framework has been used to provide evidence and input to development of energy and carbon policies: "Roadmap for flexibility services to 2030 " (2017) for the Committee on Climate Change, "An analysis of electricity system flexibility for Great Britain" (2016) for Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, "Can storage help reduce the cost of a future UK electricity system?" (2016) for Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, "System Integration Costs for Alternative Low Carbon Generation Technologies Policy Implications"(2015) for the Committee on Climate Change, "Understanding the balancing challenge" (2012), "Strategic Assessment of the Role and Value of Energy Storage Systems in the UK Low Carbon Energy Future" (2012) for the Department for Energy and Climate Change, "Benefits of EU market Integration" (2013) for European Commission. 

Intermittency:

This research investigates alternative advanced stochastic unit commitment with rolling planning to deal with wind uncertainties, including consideration frequency regulation services. These models have provided evidence to Department of Energy and Climate Change regarding the additional system costs of integrating various levels of renewable generation in the UK system (2012), and to inform EU commission about the benefits of integrating EU balancing markets (2012) and inform electricity industry regarding the value of plant flexibility and services, energy storage and demand side response in future systems with significant penetration of renewable generation (2013). 

Future Transmission Networks:

Delivering ambitions renewable energy targets cost effectively, will require fundamental changes in the historical philosophy of network operation and considerable investment. Unlike the traditional deterministic approach, our advanced probabilistic models balance the level of security against operating costs including cost of transmission constraints, various forms of generation reserves, losses, cost associated with availability and potential exercise of various operational measures, such as advanced Special Protection Schemes, Wide-Area Monitoring and Control Systems, Demand Side Response. This approach has been used to support the industry led fundamental review of the historical transmission network operation and planning standards in the UK (2009) and to inform the development of new transmission pricing models led by Ofgem (2011-2013).

recent research projects

These projects have carried out to inform governments and regulatory bodies about systm integration system challenges of transition to a low carbon electricity systems:

UNDERSTAND THE BALANCING CHALLENGE

(UK Government, 2012): this research analysed of the merits and the interaction between, alternative integration technologies: interconnection, flexible generation, storage and demand side response, in minimising overall system integration costs including real time balancing and long term investment in future GB low carbon electricity system; this included analysis of the asymmetric benefits of interconnection and value of interconnection in facilitating cross border exchange of security of supply.

BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED EUROPEAN ENERGY MARKET

(European Commission, 2013): this work focused on the benefits of further EU market integration, including consideration of bulk energy trading, balancing markets, and an EU-wide approach to meeting renewable targets. This work also included quantification of benefits associated with sharing security across in interconnections, which would inform benefits and EU wide Capacity Market, if this was decided to be implemented.

INTEGRATED TRANSMISSION PLANNING AND REGULATION

(Ofgem 2013): this study was primarily aimed at assessing the options for future development of transmission arrangements in the UK, considering onshore, offshore and interconnection regimes, to ensure coordinated and cost effective delivery.

STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT OF THE ROLE AND VALUE OF ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS IN THE UK LOW CARBON ENERGY FUTURE

(UK Government, 2012): this study was primarily aimed at quantifying the value of the electricity grid applications of storage technologies, determining the cost and performance targets, scale of deployment and benefits of storage across different time scales and different sectors of the UK system

Integrated EUROPEAN ELECTRICITY BALANCING MARKET

(European Commission, 2011-2012): In support of ACER Expert Group on Balancing Markets analysis was conducted to quantify the benefits of Integrating European balancing market through sharing tertiary reserves across EU in 2030.

THE IMPORTANCE OF LOCATIONAL SIGNALS IN ELECTRICITY MARKETS: THE CASE OF GREAT BRITAIN

(RWE, 2011,2013): modelling of transmission network congestion, losses and investment for alternative GB transmission network charging regimes, to inform regulators (in collaboration with NERA).

PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL CAPACITY RIGHTS FOR CROSS-BORDER TRADE

(European Commission, 2012): This project identified the advantages and disadvantages of long-term financial and physical transmission rights in the context of EU Target Model

FUNDAMENTAL REVIEW OF GREAT BRITAIN TRANSMISSION NETWORK OPERATION AND INVESTMENT CODES

(UK Government, 2010): this work was focused on fundamentals for determining the optimal amount of transmission network capacity that may be released to users, demonstrating that the present standard was a barrier for efficient integration of new generation and adoption of new technologies that could enhance the utilization of existing network assets and postpone investment in network reinforcement.

TRANSMISSION NETWORK TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT DECARBONISATION OF EU SYSTEM

(European Commission, 2010-2012): Grid integration assessment of connecting significant amount of renewable generation in the future EU electricity system. Impact on cross-border transmission network investment is analysed using Imperial large-scale grid system modelling tools.

THE REVISION OF THE TRANS-EUROPEAN ENERGY NETWORK POLICY (TEN-E)

(European Commission 2010):  Grid integration modelling of pan-EU transmission system network operation and investment under different future development scenarios

INCLUDING GENERATION RESERVE IN TRANSMISSION PLANNING METHODS

(National Grid, 2012): Design of new methodologies based on advance stochastic concepts and models to plan transmission networks and interconnectors in the presence of increased amount of generation reserve and renewable generation. 

TRANSMISSION ACCESS REVIEW: ANALYSIS OF CONSTRAINT COSTS AND STRAWMAN MODELS

(UK Government, 2008): study of the impacts on constraint costs associated with possible changes to transmission access arrangements as part of the Transmission Access Review.