Imperial College London

DrIanMaconochie

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Professor of Practice (Paediatric Emergency Medicine)
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 3729i.maconochie

 
 
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Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

240 results found

Monsieurs KG, Nolan JP, Bossaert LL, Greif R, Maconochie IK, Nikolaou NI, Perkins GD, Soar J, Truhlar A, Wyllie J, Zideman DAet al., 2015, European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 Section 1. Executive summary, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 95, Pages: 1-80, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Maconochie IK, de Caen AR, Aickin R, Atkins DL, Biarent D, Guerguerian A-M, Kleinman ME, Kloeck DA, Meaney PA, Nadkarni VM, Ng K-C, Nuthall G, Reis AG, Shimizu N, Tibballs J, Pintos RVet al., 2015, Pediatric basic life support and pediatric advanced life support 2015 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science with Treatment Recommendations, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 95, Pages: E147-E168, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Howell A, Walton E, 2015, Spontaneous pneumothorax in children: the problem with rare presentations, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD, Vol: 100, Pages: 903-+, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

de Caen A, Maconochie I, 2015, Pediatric CPR targets: Do rescuers measure up to the task?, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 93, Pages: A5-A6, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Phillips RS, Scott B, Carter SJ, Taylor M, Peirce E, Davies P, Maconochie IKet al., 2015, Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Outcomes after Cardiopulmonary Arrest in Childhood, PLoS ONE, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Ardolino A, Cheung CR, Lawrence T, Bouamra O, Lecky F, Berry K, Lyttle M, Roland D, Koralage N, Issa S, Chaudhary A, Maconochie Iet al., 2015, The accuracy of existing prehospital triage tools for injured children in England: an analysis using emergency department data, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 32, Pages: 397-400, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Maconochie I, 2015, Highlights from this issue, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 32, Pages: 341-341, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Deluca P, Coulton S, Alam MF, Cohen D, Donoghue K, Gilvarry E, Kaner E, Maconochie I, McArdle P, McGovern R, Newbury-Birch D, Patton R, Phillips C, Phillips T, Russell I, Strang J, Drummond Cet al., 2015, Linked randomised controlled trials of face-to-face and electronic brief intervention methods to prevent alcohol related harm in young people aged 14-17 years presenting to emergency departments (SIPS junior), BMC Public Health, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1471-2458

BackgroundAlcohol is a major global threat to public health. Although the main burden of chronic alcohol-related disease is in adults, its foundations often lie in adolescence. Alcohol consumption and related harm increase steeply from the age of 12 until 20 years. Several trials focusing upon young people have reported significant positive effects of brief interventions on a range of alcohol consumption outcomes. A recent review of reviews also suggests that electronic brief interventions (eBIs) using internet and smartphone technologies may markedly reduce alcohol consumption compared with minimal or no intervention controls.Interventions that target non-drinking youth are known to delay the onset of drinking behaviours. Web based alcohol interventions for adolescents also demonstrate significantly greater reductions in consumption and harm among ‘high-risk’ drinkers; however changes in risk status at follow-up for non-drinkers or low-risk drinkers have not been assessed in controlled trials of brief alcohol interventions.Design and methodsThe study design comprises two linked randomised controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two intervention strategies compared with screening alone. One trial will focus on high-risk adolescent drinkers attending Emergency Departments (Eds) and the other will focus on those identified as low-risk drinkers or abstinent from alcohol but attending the same ED.Our primary (null) hypothesis is similar for both trials: Personalised Feedback and Brief Advice (PFBA) and Personalised Feedback plus electronic Brief Intervention (eBI) are no more effective than screening alone in alcohol consumed at 12 months after randomisation as measured by the Time-Line Follow-Back 28-day version. Our secondary (null) hypothesis relating to economics states that PFBA and eBI are no more cost-effective than screening alone.In total 1,500 participants will be recruited into the trials, 750 high-risk drinkers a

Journal article

Kendall J, Maconochie I, Wong ICK, Howard Ret al., 2015, A novel multipatient intranasal diamorphine spray for use in acute pain in children: pharmacovigilance data from an observational study, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 32, Pages: 269-273, ISSN: 1472-0205

Objectives To establish the safety of an intranasal diamorphine (IND) spray in children.Design An open-label, single-dose pharmacovigilance trial.Setting Emergency departments in eight UK hospitals.Participants Children aged 2–16 years with a fracture or other trauma.Outcome measures Adverse events (AE) specifically related to nasal irritation, respiratory and central nervous system depression.Results 226 patients received 0.1 mg/kg IND. No serious or severe AEs occurred. The incidence of treatment-emergent AEs (TEAEs) was 26.5% (95% CI 20.9% to 32.8%), 93% being mild. 89% were related to treatment, all being known effects of the drug or route of administration except for three events in two patients. 20.4% (95% CI 15.3% to 26.2%) patients reported nasal irritation, all mild except one moderate and one ‘unknown’ severity. No respiratory depression was reported. Three AEs related to reduced Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) occurred, all mild.Conclusions There were no safety concerns raised during the conduct of the study. In addition to expected side effects, IND can cause mild nasal irritation in a proportion of patients.

Journal article

Beynon R, Maconochie I, 2015, Febrile seizures, Challenging Concepts in Emergency Medicine, Publisher: Oxford University Press, Pages: 167-176, ISBN: 9780199654093

Book chapter

Hartshorn S, O'Sullivan R, Maconochie IK, Bevan C, Cleugh F, Lyttle MDet al., 2015, Establishing the research priorities of paediatric emergency medicine clinicians in the UK and Ireland, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 32, Pages: 864-868, ISSN: 1472-0205

Objective Paediatric Emergency Research in the UK and Ireland (PERUKI) is a collaborative clinical studies group established in August 2012. It consists of a network of 43 centres from England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and aims to improve the emergency care of children through the performance of robust collaborative multicentre research within emergency departments. A study was conducted regarding the research priorities of PERUKI, to establish the research agenda for paediatric emergency medicine in the UK and Ireland.Methods A two-stage modified Delphi survey was conducted of PERUKI members via an online survey platform. Stage 1 allowed each member to submit up to 12 individual questions that they identified as priorities for future research. In stage 2, the shortlisted questions were each rated on a seven-point Likert scale of relative importance.Participants Members of PERUKI, including clinical specialists, academics, trainees and research nurses.Results Stage 1 surveys were submitted by 46/91 PERUKI members (51%). A total of 249 research questions were generated and, following the removal of duplicate questions and shortlisting, 60 questions were carried forward for stage 2 ranking. Stage 2 survey responses were submitted by 58/95 members (61%). For the 60 research questions that were rated, the mean score of ‘relative degree of importance’ was 4.70 (range 3.36–5.62, SD 0.55). After ranking, the top 10 research priorities included questions on biomarkers for serious bacterial illness, major trauma, intravenous bronchodilators for asthma and decision rules for fever with petechiae, head injury and atraumatic limp.Conclusions Research priorities of PERUKI members have been identified. By sharing these results with clinicians, academics and funding bodies, future research efforts can be focused to the areas of greatest need.

Journal article

Maconochie I, Deakin CD, 2015, Resuscitating drowned children, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 350, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Lyttle MD, O'Sullivan R, Doull I, Hartshorn S, Morris I, Powell CVEet al., 2015, Variation in treatment of acute childhood wheeze in emergency departments of the United Kingdom and Ireland: an international survey of clinician practice, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD, Vol: 100, Pages: 121-125, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

Shehadeh AJ, Soliman AR, Maconochie I, 2015, Review of resuscitation physiology in children, Paediatrics and Child Health (United Kingdom), Vol: 25, Pages: 210-213, ISSN: 1751-7222

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. More than one quarter of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5-10% of children survive to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) differs in children from adults. Following the Airway, Breathing, Circulation format, this article reviews the physiology of paediatric cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. It addresses the appropriate interventions during CPR, mechanisms of action of commonly used drugs and special resuscitation circumstances: premature and newly born infants, traumatic cardiac arrest, and ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation). New exciting discoveries in resuscitation science postulate that the key factor in improving outcomes of paediatric cardiac arrest is improving the quality of interventions. A thorough understanding of the physiology underpinning CPR is helpful in ensuring optimal delivery of CPR in children and improving clinical outcomes.

Journal article

Morris I, Lyttle MD, O'Sullivan R, Sargant N, Doull IJM, Powell CVEet al., 2015, Which intravenous bronchodilators are being administered to children presenting with acute severe wheeze in the UK and Ireland?, Thorax, Vol: 70, Pages: 88-91, ISSN: 0040-6376

Journal article

, Recent Advances in Paediatrics 26, Publisher: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd., ISBN: 9781907816949

Book

Maconochie IK, 2014, Highlights from this issue, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 31, Pages: 793-793, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Wong T, Stang AS, Ganshorn H, Hartling L, Maconochie IK, Thomsen AM, Johnson DWet al., 2014, Cochrane in context: Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children., Evid Based Child Health, Vol: 9, Pages: 730-732

BACKGROUND: Health-care professionals frequently recommend fever treatment regimens for children who either combine paracetamol and ibuprofen or alternate them.However, there is uncertainty about whether these regimens are better than using single agents and about the adverse effect profile of combination regimens. OBJECTIVES: To assess the results and side effects of combining paracetamol and ibuprofen, or alternating them in consecutive treatments, compared with monotherapy for treating fever in children. SEARCH METHODS: In September 2013, we searched Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials that compared alternating or combined paracetamol and ibuprofen regimens with monotherapy in children with fever. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: One review author and two assistants independently screened the searches and applied the inclusion criteria. Two authors assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence independently. We conducted various analyses for different comparison groups (combined therapy versus monotherapy, alternating therapy versus monotherapy and combined therapy versus alternating therapy). MAIN RESULTS: Six studies, enrolling 915 participants, are included. Compared to administering a single antipyretic alone, administering combined paracetamol and ibuprofen to febrile children can result in a lower mean temperature at 1 hour after treatment (mean difference -0.27 ∘C, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.08, two trials, 163 participants, moderate quality evidence). If no further antipyretics are given, combined treatment probably also results in a lower mean temperature at 4 hours (mean difference -0.70 ∘C, 95% confidence interval -1.05 to -0.35, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence), and in fewer children remaining or becoming

Journal article

Wong T, Stang AS, Ganshorn H, Hartling L, Maconochie IK, Thomsen AM, Johnson DWet al., 2014, Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children., Evid Based Child Health, Vol: 9, Pages: 675-729

BACKGROUND: Health professionals frequently recommend fever treatment regimens for children that either combine paracetamol and ibuprofen or alternate them. However, there is uncertainty about whether these regimens are better than the use of single agents, and about the adverse effect profile of combination regimens. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects and side effects of combining paracetamol and ibuprofen, or alternating them on consecutive treatments, compared with monotherapy for treating fever in children. SEARCH METHODS: In September 2013, we searched Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials comparing alternating or combined paracetamol and ibuprofen regimens with monotherapy in children with fever. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: One review author and two assistants independently screened the searches and applied inclusion criteria. Two authors assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence independently. We conducted separate analyses for different comparison groups (combined therapy versus monotherapy, alternating therapy versus monotherapy, combined therapy versus alternating therapy). MAIN RESULTS: Six studies, enrolling 915 participants, are included. Compared to giving a single antipyretic alone, giving combined paracetamol and ibuprofen to febrile children can result in a lower mean temperature at one hour after treatment (MD -0.27 °Celsius, 95% CI -0.45 to -0.08, two trials, 163 participants, moderate quality evidence). If no further antipyretics are given, combined treatment probably also results in a lower mean temperature at four hours (MD -0.70 °Celsius, 95% CI -1.05 to -0.35, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence), and in fewer children remaining or becoming febrile for at least four hours after treatment (RR 0.0

Journal article

Nolan JP, Soar J, Smith GB, Gwinnutt C, Parrott F, Power S, Harrison DA, Nixon E, Rowan Ket al., 2014, Incidence and outcome of in-hospital cardiac arrest in the United Kingdom National Cardiac Arrest Audit, Resuscitation, Vol: 85, Pages: 987-992, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Lyttle MD, O'Sullivan R, Hartshorn S, Bevan C, Cleugh F, Maconochie Iet al., 2014, Pediatric Emergency Research in the UK and Ireland (PERUKI): developing a collaborative for multicentre research, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD, Vol: 99, Pages: 602-603, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Bingham R, 2014, Paediatric resuscitation., BMJ, Vol: 348

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Bingham R, 2014, ABC of Resuscitation, 6th Edition Paediatric Resuscitation, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 348, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Hartshorn S, Bevan C, Cleugh F, Lyttle M, Maconochie I, O'Sullivan Ret al., 2014, G12 What are the Research Priorities of Paediatric Emergency Medicine Clinicians in the United Kingdom & Ireland? An International Survey, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol: 99, Pages: A5-A6, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

Mintegi S, Lyttle MD, Maconochie IK, Benito J, Gervaix A, Moll H, Shavit I, Da Dalt L, Waisman Yet al., 2014, From cradle to adolescence: the development of Research in European Pediatric Emergency Medicine, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Vol: 21, Pages: 24-29, ISSN: 0969-9546

Journal article

Seiger N, van Veen M, Almeida H, Steyerberg EW, van Meurs AHJ, Carneiro R, Alves CF, Maconochie I, van der Lei J, Moll HAet al., 2014, Improving the manchester triage system for pediatric emergency care: an international multicenter study, PLOS One, Vol: 9, ISSN: 1932-6203

ObjectivesThis multicenter study examines the performance of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) after changing discriminators, and with the addition use of abnormal vital sign in patients presenting to pediatric emergency departments (EDs).DesignInternational multicenter studySettingsEDs of two hospitals in The Netherlands (2006–2009), one in Portugal (November–December 2010), and one in UK (June–November 2010).PatientsChildren (<16years) triaged with the MTS who presented at the ED.MethodsChanges to discriminators (MTS 1) and the value of including abnormal vital signs (MTS 2) were studied to test if this would decrease the number of incorrect assignment. Admission to hospital using the new MTS was compared with those in the original MTS. Likelihood ratios, diagnostic odds ratios (DORs), and c-statistics were calculated as measures for performance and compared with the original MTS. To calculate likelihood ratios and DORs, the MTS had to be dichotomized in low urgent and high urgent.Results60,375 patients were included, of whom 13% were admitted. When MTS 1 was used, admission to hospital increased from 25% to 29% for MTS ‘very urgent’ patients and remained similar in lower MTS urgency levels. The diagnostic odds ratio improved from 4.8 (95%CI 4.5–5.1) to 6.2 (95%CI 5.9–6.6) and the c-statistic remained 0.74. MTS 2 did not improve the performance of the MTS.ConclusionsMTS 1 performed slightly better than the original MTS. The use of vital signs (MTS 2) did not improve the MTS performance.

Journal article

Plunkett A, Maconochie I, Scholefield BR, 2014, Towards global reporting of every paediatric cardiac arrest, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 85, Pages: 15-16, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S, 2014, Fluid therapy for acute bacterial meningitis, COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, ISSN: 1469-493X

Journal article

Seiger N, Maconochie I, Oostenbrink R, Moll HAet al., 2013, Validity of Different Pediatric Early Warning Scores in the Emergency Department, PEDIATRICS, Vol: 132, Pages: E841-E850, ISSN: 0031-4005

Journal article

Lyttle MD, Ardolino A, Berry K, Bouamra O, Cheung R, Lawrence T, Lecky F, Maconochie IKet al., 2013, USING EXISTING PAEDIATRIC PRE-HOSPITAL TRAUMA TRIAGE TOOLS TO IDENTIFY CHILDREN WITH SEVERE TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY–AN ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL TRAUMA REGISTRY DATA, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 30, Pages: 879.2-879, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

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