Imperial College London

DrIanMaconochie

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Professor of Practice (Paediatric Emergency Medicine)
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 3729i.maconochie

 
 
//

Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

249 results found

Maconochie IK, 2011, Highlights from this issue, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 28, Pages: 733-733, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Biarent D, Bingham R, Eich C, Lopez-Herce J, Maconochie I, Rodriguez-Nunez A, Rajka T, Zideman Det al., 2011, Paediatric Life support in Children vol 13, pg 635, 2010, NOTFALL & RETTUNGSMEDIZIN, Vol: 14, Pages: 303-303, ISSN: 1434-6222

Journal article

Soliman AR, Maconochie IK, 2011, Review of resuscitation physiology in children, Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol: 21, Pages: 159-162, ISSN: 1751-7222

More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5-10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation differs in children from adults.Following the Airway, Breathing, Circulation format, this article reviews the physiology of paediatric cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. It addresses the appropriate interventions during cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, mechanisms of action of the drugs that are commonly used in advanced life support, and special resuscitation circumstances: premature and newly born infants, traumatic cardiac arrest, ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation) CPR.New exciting discoveries in resuscitation science postulate that the key factor in improving outcomes of paediatric cardiac arrest is improving the quality of interventions. Evolving training strategies include simulation training with real-time feedback in simulated scenarios that use high-tech mannequins. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

Journal article

Fleming S, Thompson M, Stevens R, Heneghan C, Plueddemann A, Maconochie I, Tarassenko L, Mant Det al., 2011, Normal ranges of heart rate and respiratory rate in children from birth to 18 years of age: a systematic review of observational studies, LANCET, Vol: 377, Pages: 1011-1018, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Maconochie IK, 2011, Primary survey, Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol: 28, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Kerr M, Maconochie I, 2010, Intranasal diamorphine usage in paediatric accident and emergency, Current Pediatric Reviews, Vol: 6, Pages: 151-155, ISSN: 1573-3963

Intranasal diamorphine is a rapid, effective, analgesia, with few side effects, giving it multiple advantages over other forms of analgesia. It is also importantly a needle free alternative, acceptable to children, parents and medical staff. Due to these advantages, it is thought to be increasingly used in Paediatric A&E, and possibly the most popular analgesia for severe acute pain, despite being unlicensed. However, there is little quantified data on the extent of its usage. In order to clarify this, we surveyed all 214 NHS A&E departments in England in Wales with the scenario of an uncomplicated long bone fracture. There were 116 responses (75% return rate), showing that 60% of departments were using intranasal opioid (90% diamorphine) as 1st line and 70% as 1st or 2nd line analgesia for long bone fracture. When compared to any other drugs used, intranasal diamorphine was nearly four times more likely to be used as the 1st line analgesia. Despite being unlicensed, intranasal diamorphine is widely accepted and the most commonly used analgesia in Paediatric A&E for acute pain in long bone fracture. This article also reviews the literature on intranasal diamorphine with an emphasis on Paediatric usage. © 2010 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

Journal article

Mercier J-C, Maconochie I, Benito Sanchez J, Da Dalt L, Gervaix A, Eisler G, Moll H, Martinot A, Ryan Met al., 2010, ORGANISATION OF PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCY CARE IN EUROPE, Publisher: NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: 371-371, ISSN: 0031-3998

Conference paper

Biarent D, Bingham R, Eich C, Lopez-Herce J, Maconochie I, Rodriguez-Nunez A, Rajka T, Zideman Det al., 2010, European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 6. Paediatric life support, NOTFALL & RETTUNGSMEDIZIN, Vol: 13, Pages: 635-664, ISSN: 1434-6222

Journal article

Mercier J-C, Maconochie I, Sanchez BJ, Da Dalt L, Gervaix A, Eisler G, Moll H, Martinot A, Ryan Met al., 2010, 731 Organisation of Paediatric Emergency Care in Europe, Pediatric Research, Vol: 68, Pages: 371-371, ISSN: 0031-3998

Journal article

Biarent D, Bingham R, Eich C, Lopez-Herce J, Maconochie I, Rodriguez-Nunez A, Rajka T, Zideman Det al., 2010, European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 6 Paediatric life support, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 81, Pages: 1364-1388, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Hadley G, Maconochie I, Jackson A, 2010, A survey of intranasal medication use in the paediatric emergency setting in England and Wales, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 27, Pages: 553-554, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Visintin C, Mugglestone MA, Fields EJ, Jacklin P, Murphy MS, Pollard AJet al., 2010, Management of bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia in children and young people: summary of NICE guidance, BMJ, Vol: 340, Pages: c3209-c3209, ISSN: 0959-8138

Journal article

Maconochie I, Ross M, 2010, Head injury (moderate to severe)., BMJ Clin Evid, Vol: 2010

INTRODUCTION: Head injury in young adults is often associated with motor vehicle accidents, violence, and sports injuries. In older adults it is often associated with falls. Severe head injury can lead to secondary brain damage from cerebral ischaemia resulting from hypotension, hypercapnia, and raised intracranial pressure. Severity of brain injury is assessed using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). While about one quarter of people with severe brain injury (GCS score less than 8) will make a good recovery, about one third will die, and one fifth will have severe disability or be in a vegetative state. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions to reduce complications of moderate to severe head injury as defined by Glasgow Coma Scale? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). RESULTS: We found 17 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. CONCLUSIONS: In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, anticonvulsants, corticosteroids, hyperventilation, hypothermia, and mannitol.

Journal article

O'Donnell NA, Wood B, Salter R, Maconochie Iet al., 2010, The outcome of new referrals made by paediatric emergency medicine department to children's social services and a survey of the feedback received afterwards, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol: 95, Pages: A40-A41, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

Clark A, Warner J, Lloydhope K, Alfaham M, East M, Ewan P, Jewkes F, King R, Leech S, Maconochie I, Sheikh A, Sohi D, Sinnott L, Tomlin Set al., 2010, Development of a national care pathway for children with anaphylaxis, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol: 95, Pages: A23.3-A24, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

Kleinman ME, de Caen AR, Chameides L, Atkins DL, Berg RA, Berg MD, Bhanji F, Biarent D, Bingham R, Coovadia AH, Hazinski MF, Hickey RW, Nadkarni VM, Reis AG, Rodriguez-Nunez A, Tibballs J, Zaritsky AL, Zideman D, Pediatric B, Advanced Life Support Chapter Cet al., 2010, Pediatric basic and advanced life support: 2010 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science with Treatment Recommendations, Pediatrics, Vol: 126, Pages: e1261-e1318, ISSN: 1098-4275

Journal article

Sandell JM, Maconochie IK, Jewkes F, 2009, Prehospital paediatric emergency care: paediatric triage, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 26, Pages: 767-768, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Davies P, Maconochie I, 2009, The relationship between body temperature, heart rate and respiratory rate in children, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 26, Pages: 641-643, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Chin RFM, Neville BGR, Peckham C, Wade A, Bedford H, Scott RCet al., 2009, Socioeconomic deprivation independent of ethnicity increases status epilepticus risk, Epilepsia, Vol: 50, Pages: 1022-1029, ISSN: 0013-9580

Journal article

Soar J, 2009, Emergency treatment of anaphylaxis in adults: concise guidance, Clinical Medicine, Vol: 9, Pages: 181-185, ISSN: 1470-2118

Journal article

Cleugh FM, Maconochie IK, 2009, Management of the multiply injured child, Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol: 19, Pages: 108-113, ISSN: 1751-7222

Injury is the commonest cause of death and morbidity in children and accounts for most attendances at paediatric emergency departments. Optimal management of the multiply injured child relies on anticipation and preparation, followed by a standardized, consistent and structured response from healthcare professionals. Staff must be appropriately trained and supported by a regional tertiary paediatric trauma centre. Initial management involves a primary survey with resuscitation, using an 'ABC' approach, and treatment of life-threatening injuries as they arise. The details of this are outlined in this review, highlighting important child-specific factors. Once stabilized, injured children must be assessed by secondary survey to rule out all possible injuries and, if necessary, transferred to an appropriate tertiary unit. Support from regionalized tertiary centres and ongoing training for staff is paramount in optimizing outcome of the multiply injured child. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Baumer JH, Stewart M, 2009, Summary of ‘Fluid therapy for acute bacterial meningitis’, including tables of key findings and quality of included trials, Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal, Vol: 4, Pages: 58-60, ISSN: 1557-6272

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Baumer JH, Stewart M, 2009, Cochrane review: Fluid therapy for acute bacterial meningitis, Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal, Vol: 4, Pages: 15-57, ISSN: 1557-6272

Journal article

, 2009, Lebensrettende Maßnahmen bei Kindern (Paediatric Life Support, PLS), Der Unfallchirurg, Vol: 112, Pages: 265-293, ISSN: 0177-5537

Journal article

Nager AL, Maconochie IK, 2008, Dehydration and Disorders of Sodium Balance, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Pages: 782-786, ISBN: 9781416000877

Book chapter

Bradman K, Maconochie I, 2008, Can paediatric early warning score be used as a triage tool in paediatric accident and emergency?, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Vol: 15, Pages: 359-360, ISSN: 0969-9546

Journal article

Maconochie I, Dawood M, 2008, Manchester triage system in paediatric emergency care, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 337, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Salter R, Maconochie I, 2008, Blood sampling through intraosseous needles: Time to stop? Reply, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 79, Pages: 168-169, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Ireland S, Gilchrist J, Maconochie I, 2008, Debriefing after failed paediatric resuscitation: a survey of current UK practice, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 25, Pages: 328-330, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: id=00306323&limit=30&person=true&page=6&respub-action=search.html